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What kind of post-op tea did you drink?



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I love warm tea and wanted to know for post-op if there was a favorite tea that soothed your tum. Also what what’s your preference with the temp of liquids in general?

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Finally a thread I was made for...Lol

ALL of them, (Literally ALL I drink a lot of tea) I stayed away from caffeinated and peppermint in the beginning but then I returned to them soon after.

I love Good Earth Matcha Maker , Celestial seasonings Red Zinger, Tazo Passion, Harney & Son's Green tea with coconut, Bigelow plantation mint (sketchy name), teavana youthberry , English Earl Greys, ceremonial matcha,etc ...

I need tea to be extremely hot almost boiling when I drink it,

Edited by GreenTealael

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Smooth Move tea. Oh- also iced passion fruit tea.

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1 hour ago, GreenTealael said:

Finally a thread I was made for...Lol

ALL of them, (Literally ALL I drink a lot of tea) I stayed away from caffeinated and peppermint in the beginning but then I returned to them soon after.

I love Good Earth Matcha Maker , Celestial seasonings Red Zinger, Tazo Passion, Harney & Son's Green tea with coconut, Bigelow plantation mint (sketchy name), teavana youthberry , English Earl Greys, ceremonial matcha,etc ...

I need tea to be extremely hot almost boiling when I drink it,

How soon after surgery were you able to tolerate the heat? I love Hot Drinks, my fall and winter will be ruined without them

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11 minutes ago, Naughty Glitter Goddess said:

How soon after surgery were you able to tolerate the heat? I love Hot Drinks, my fall and winter will be ruined without them

Immediately

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Great to know!
I wonder if peppermint right after is too soon??

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Well,at and no, as a child my god-mother gave me peppermint tea for a colicky tummy and help ecpell gas, not my gastroenterologist tells me if you have any gastritis it will irritate your stomach lining and,make you feel,worse. Aunt Edith and Dr Mujtaba, gight,it out among yourselves! Personally,i like peppermint and spearmint, don't care for wintergreen. Bigalow Tea makes a lovely,mint based,tea, I love it for,my iced tea. Like Constant Comment still, But this is GOOD stuff.🍵

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I drink anything from Lipton to chai. When I have cravings, I find a chai tea latte (made with Premier Protein vanilla shake) really satisfies the cravings. In the winter, I stock up on eggnog and salted caramel teas, too. YUM.

I was able to drink tea immediately upon returning from the hospital.

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Oh good to know! I wondered if I could when I got home. Tomorrow is the big day! Eeeek!

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I drank hot tea (cold Water made my stomach hurt and hot was soothing). Loved and had peppermint right away - only way I was able to drink water for first month. I love all decaf teas .... especially iced this summer 😊

Good luck tomorrow!

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I have been a daily tea drinker for years and consider myself a bit of an aficionado. I generally do not drink high caffeine teas and NEVER drink black tea (the kind in iced tea). I prefer green teas and herbal teas, but also drink some specialty teas such as Oolong and Pu'erh. I LOVE teas and often drink them medicinally.

In the hospital, I drank a Pu'erh & chrysanthemum tea, but the nurses wouldn't let me have it hot hot. It was luke warm at best. Pu'erh & chrysanthemum is good for digestion and bloating, so I put some in my overnight bag because I figured it might help with tummy distress in my immediate post operative state.

When I got home, I continued to drink the Pu'erh & chrysanthemum but also began drinking ginger tea. Ginger is also good for tummy troubles. I did not drink it very hot for about a week or so. Not because it caused pain or distress, but I figured that the surgical site in my tummy really wasn't up to extremes.

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Mint tea is fine if you can tolerate it (and if your team didn't tell you not to): it's good at fighting nausea, but it will increase the chances of acid reflux. I'm pretty sure my team said not to risk it.

Avoid at first:

I saw a doctor somewhere explicitly suggest avoiding ginger, which is a bummer: that's good for pain and nausea. But it's also a very "hot" herb, and I could see it irritating the staple line. Also it is potentially dangerous to combine with blood thinners. I definitely plan to hold off on that. Ginko biloba and Asian ginseng are potentially dangerous with blood thinners, in the same way as ginger, so they'd also be good to avoid for at least until you're off those. Dong quai, fenugreek, horse chestnut, red clover, sweet clover, sweet woodruff, meadowsweet, wintergreen, willow, poplar, and reishi are also worth avoiding while on blood thinners. (I don't know this all off the top of my head; I have a book of herbal and medicine interactions. It's a few years old, so there are almost certainly other herbs I haven't listed.)

After you're off the blood thinners, gingko biloba and Asian ginseng would both be fine to add back in if your doc OKs it; they may even support healing.

Meadowsweet, wintergreen, willow, and poplar contain a similar substance to aspirin, so I plan to avoid them until I'm cleared for NSAIDs again.

I also plan to avoid licorice. It can mess with the digestive system (usually in good ways, but I'm not sure what mixing it with the PPIs would do), and it can raise your blood pressure.

I have to avoid it for other reasons, but for the two weeks before and after surgery you'll want to make sure to avoid St. John's Wort, which affects the absorption of medicines.

It's not a tea thing (unless you're a lot more hardcore than I am :D), but it's a good idea to avoid garlic for two weeks before and after surgery.

A website I was looking at for suggestions of teas to drink after surgery also said to avoid Kava and Ephedra (OK, that second one seems obvious) for two weeks before and after surgery.

Nice possibilities:

If you aren't allergic (I am, which is a bummer), chamomile would be a nice tummy-settling and mentally soothing herb that might also help you sleep while you're in the hospital. (It has potential interactions with chemotherapy drugs like methotrexate, but no other class of drugs or medicines is listed alongside it in the book I'm using.)

A tea blend with lavender in it would be really nice if you're into floral tastes at all. It helps a tiny bit with pain and with fighting off unwanted bacteria. One study found that just smelling lavender helped people cope with pain after surgery, too. (No known drug interactions.)

Because getting proper nutrition is a tricky thing immediately after surgery, I plan to drink teas made up of nutritive herbs like nettles, oat straw, raspberry leaf (or not, note below), and maybe rose hips. (I'm going to play with the amounts until I find something I like the taste of.) (The only interaction listed for nettles is diclofenac, which is an NSAID. That said, nettles are also a very, very gentle diuretic--gentle enough that they aren't even contraindicated with medical diuretics in this book--so I might add a little marshmallow leaf to help balance that.)

Hibiscus is a nice tea and also contains some Vitamins and minerals. (Nothing is listed about it in my book, good or bad.)

Echinacea would be nice, though like chamomile, it has potential interactions with some chemotherapy drugs.

After I'm off the "good pain meds," I'll probably add in more raspberry leaf, some red clover leaf, keep doing the nettles, add in some mullein (good for the lungs, as well), and keep balancing that formula with marshmallow leaf.

If your main pain med contains codeine:

You may get a little less bang for the pain med buck (fancy medical term: "reduced drug absorption/bioavailability") if you're drinking green tea, black tea, raspberry leaf tea, uva ursi, or anything else that contains tannins. I'm not saying "don't," but maybe just "mix it up a bit with other things."

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1 hour ago, CrankyMagpie said:

Mint tea is fine if you can tolerate it (and if your team didn't tell you not to): it's good at fighting nausea, but it will increase the chances of acid reflux. I'm pretty sure my team said not to risk it.

Avoid at first:

I saw a doctor somewhere explicitly suggest avoiding ginger, which is a bummer: that's good for pain and nausea. But it's also a very "hot" herb, and I could see it irritating the staple line. Also it is potentially dangerous to combine with blood thinners. I definitely plan to hold off on that. Ginko biloba and Asian ginseng are potentially dangerous with blood thinners, in the same way as ginger, so they'd also be good to avoid for at least until you're off those. Dong quai, fenugreek, horse chestnut, red clover, sweet clover, sweet woodruff, meadowsweet, wintergreen, willow, poplar, and reishi are also worth avoiding while on blood thinners. (I don't know this all off the top of my head; I have a book of herbal and medicine interactions. It's a few years old, so there are almost certainly other herbs I haven't listed.)

After you're off the blood thinners, gingko biloba and Asian ginseng would both be fine to add back in if your doc OKs it; they may even support healing.

Meadowsweet, wintergreen, willow, and poplar contain a similar substance to aspirin, so I plan to avoid them until I'm cleared for NSAIDs again.

I also plan to avoid licorice. It can mess with the digestive system (usually in good ways, but I'm not sure what mixing it with the PPIs would do), and it can raise your blood pressure.

I have to avoid it for other reasons, but for the two weeks before and after surgery you'll want to make sure to avoid St. John's Wort, which affects the absorption of medicines.

It's not a tea thing (unless you're a lot more hardcore than I am :D), but it's a good idea to avoid garlic for two weeks before and after surgery.

A website I was looking at for suggestions of teas to drink after surgery also said to avoid Kava and Ephedra (OK, that second one seems obvious) for two weeks before and after surgery.

Nice possibilities:

If you aren't allergic (I am, which is a bummer), chamomile would be a nice tummy-settling and mentally soothing herb that might also help you sleep while you're in the hospital. (It has potential interactions with chemotherapy drugs like methotrexate, but no other class of drugs or medicines is listed alongside it in the book I'm using.)

A tea blend with lavender in it would be really nice if you're into floral tastes at all. It helps a tiny bit with pain and with fighting off unwanted bacteria. One study found that just smelling lavender helped people cope with pain after surgery, too. (No known drug interactions.)

Because getting proper nutrition is a tricky thing immediately after surgery, I plan to drink teas made up of nutritive herbs like nettles, oat straw, raspberry leaf (or not, note below), and maybe rose hips. (I'm going to play with the amounts until I find something I like the taste of.) (The only interaction listed for nettles is diclofenac, which is an NSAID. That said, nettles are also a very, very gentle diuretic--gentle enough that they aren't even contraindicated with medical diuretics in this book--so I might add a little marshmallow leaf to help balance that.)

Hibiscus is a nice tea and also contains some Vitamins and minerals. (Nothing is listed about it in my book, good or bad.)

Echinacea would be nice, though like chamomile, it has potential interactions with some chemotherapy drugs.

After I'm off the "good pain meds," I'll probably add in more raspberry leaf, some red clover leaf, keep doing the nettles, add in some mullein (good for the lungs, as well), and keep balancing that formula with marshmallow leaf.

If your main pain med contains codeine:

You may get a little less bang for the pain med buck (fancy medical term: "reduced drug absorption/bioavailability") if you're drinking green tea, black tea, raspberry leaf tea, uva ursi, or anything else that contains tannins. I'm not saying "don't," but maybe just "mix it up a bit with other things."

Great post !!!

I forgot to mention i also avoided ginger tea for the same reason. Thanks for the reminder that medicinal teas are indeed medicine and should never be taken without proper knowledge of use/interactions. I forget that I know this stuff but other people may not.

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Thank you all for taking time to post.
Going to take the wonderful advice you all have shared. I don’t know what I would do without you guys!

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