Aging process and Sleeve


12 posts in this topic

Do you mean the nutritional impacts? The sleeve has only been around since 2011 so the data is not in.

My logical self says that it will not have much impact. Usually when we get old our appetite decreases and our diversity of food choices decrease as well. Consequently, I feel that nutritionally it will have the least impact of all WLS surgeries as malabsorption is not a factor in the equation.

I hope that kind of answer is what you are looking for.

P

rosy066 and Blater like this 2 Like this

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Yes, I think that's what I was thinking of, I am seeing many young people on this forum getting sleeved. With other WLS fading from popularitysuch as the band. Was wondering the long term implications.

By the way, I understand the sleeve was around since 1999. But has recently become popular.

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2 hours ago, Blater said:

Yes, I think that's what I was thinking of, I am seeing many young people on this forum getting sleeved. With other WLS fading from popularitysuch as the band. Was wondering the long term implications.

By the way, I understand the sleeve was around since 1999. But has recently become popular.

That is correct. People began getting Jt more around 2007

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Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, Blater said:

I am trying to better understand the impact of aging on our sleeve. Any thoughts?

Given the numerous studies that have found a positive correlation between calorie restriction and increased longevity, I would not be surprised to see a bump in longevity for sleeved peeps once the post-op and comorbidity mortality have been neutralized.

On the other hand, we may also have a propensity to LOOK older than we would have otherwise due to sagging skin and lower fat intake. There could also be osteoporosis and dental repercussions for those of us who don't keep up with the Calcium supplements, especially if sleeved young.

I've been pondering on this, too, can you tell? But I'm hoping the surgery will let me age more like my relatively slender paternal relatives rather than my maternal relatives who are all struggling with the syndrome X spectrum of health and weight issues and who tend to become infirm much younger.

Edited by HeatherS.
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Those are great points Heather.

With how different the post op instructions from surgeons on Vitamins, for instance I was told I didn't need calcium after three months and no b12! Thank god, I did tons of research. I wouldn't be surprised if forums 10 or 15 years have posts from lots of people complaining of complications due vitamins deficiency.

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7 minutes ago, Blater said:

Those are great points Heather.

With how different the post op instructions from surgeons on Vitamins, for instance I was told I didn't need Calcium after three months and no b12! Thank god, I did tons of research. I wouldn't be surprised if forums 10 or 15 years have posts from lots of people complaining of complications due Vitamins deficiency.

I think you're right, especially those who don't follow up on the bloodwork with their GPs. Blood work is what wasn't mentioned by my surgical team.

Also, a lot of people think that because VSG isn't malabsorptive, Vitamin deficiencies aren't an issue while forgetting that some vitamins need to spend time in the stomach to start breaking down with the stomach acids, which affects how much your body can actually extract (calcium is one of those, I think?)

Its too easy to forget that less food = fewer nutrients. And lots of people going the ketogenic route are virtually eliminating whole categories of nutrient-bearing foods.

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Another thought is that pre-sleeve I was eating nutrient deficient foods. Most of what I ate was probably pretty bad for me.

Now I eat dense Proteins and few carbs. What carbs I do get are from veggies.

My body is fed better than it ever has been.

I was not told to take a calcium supplement either but it just made sense.

Take care


Blater likes this 1 Like this

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I was thinking of older wls and with a google search ran into a forum for folks who had the VBG. Reading the stories of folks who are dealing with complications 10 and 20 years was scary!

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On 4/15/2017 at 11:29 AM, Pam_2-06-2017 said:

Do you mean the nutritional impacts? The sleeve has only been around since 2011 so the data is not in.

My logical self says that it will not have much impact. Usually when we get old our appetite decreases and our diversity of food choices decrease as well. Consequently, I feel that nutritionally it will have the least impact of all WLS surgeries as malabsorption is not a factor in the equation.

I hope that kind of answer is what you are looking for.

P

People have had all or most of their stomach removed for various reasons, ulcers, war injuries for over 100 years. There is tons of data on it.

While the application for weight loss is new, removing the stomach is a very old procedure with tons of data. More than RNY which is why I choose it.

People live long healthy lives with a minimal or no stomach. You do not need a stomach to live, found however need healthy intestines.

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