Learning to run after bariatric surgery.


25 posts in this topic

There seems to be a lot of people interested in putting on running shoes after surgery. I did some research to see what might be the best way to tackle this endeavor.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23790819/

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Considerations for initiating and progressing running programs in obese individuals.

...gradual weight loss, avoidance of injury...

Pre-emptive strengthening exercises can improve the strength of the foot and ankle, hip abductor, quadriceps, and trunk to help support the joints bearing the loads before starting a running program...

intensity or mileage increases should be slow and consistent to prevent musculoskeletal injury... at a rate not exceeding 5%-10% of weekly mileage or duration... pain should neither carry over to the next day nor be increased the day after exercising. Rest days in between running sessions may help prevent overuse injury. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery and are now lean can also run, but special foci such as hydration and energy replacement must be considered. In summary, obese persons can run for exercise, provided they follow conservative transitions and progression, schedule rest days, and heed onset of pain symptoms.

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Week / Distance / Speed
-------------------------------------------
1.............. 0.67mile............. 2.00mph
2................ 0.74 .............2.22
3.................. 0.81................... 2.43
4. ................0.89.................... 2.67
....................................................
5 and 6:....... 1 mile ................3.0 mph
7 and 8: .......1.10 ...................3.30
9 and 10: .....1.21 ..................3.63
11 and 12: ....1.33 .................3.99
13 and 14: ....1.46 ................4.38
15 and 16: ....1.61 ...............4.83
17 and 18: .....1.77................ 5.31
19 and 20: .....1.95 ...............5.85
21 and 22:.......2.14............... 6.42
23 and 24: ......2.33 ...............7.00

---------------------------------------------

25 and 26: ........2.56.............. 7.00

27 and 28:........ 2.81 ...............7.00

29 and 30: .........3.10 ...............7.00 (Congratulations! You are now running a 5k at 7mph.)

Alright, so I created this chart based on the recommendations in the article. This seems like it could be a very reasonable progression.. a bariatric couch to 5k, if you will. In approximately 7 months, a person following this plan can go from walking 2/3 of a mile at 2mph to running over 3 miles straight.

The chart above shows a 10% progression (and indicates the quickest we should advance. More slowly is fine). Time allotted is 20 minutes. A 5 minute warmup and 10 minute cool down are not included.

Walking or running should be undertaken every other day, and if you are sore the day after running, then go back to the previous week's plan. The goal is to have a pain free experience (especially joint pain. A bit of muscle soreness is to be expected).

Once we reach 5k at 7mph, then we can work up either speed or distance, gradually, from there.

And, as mentioned, weight lifting is also a great thing to start to go along with the running. Weights can be super simple. Twice a week go to the gym. Do 12 reps on each machine, trying to make sure to work each main muscle group. Start at the lightest weight. Each week increase the weight one level (usually 5-10lbs). The first few weeks will feel like a joke. And it should be. Make it fun, make it a habit.. and you won't mind going back.

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Great info. I started C25K approx. 4 months ago and petered out on it because I was trying to run faster than my 5'2" frame would carry me given the timeframe and the 30 minute 5k goal. I stopped the program, slowed myself down and started alternating sprint intervals with long runs. Once I slowed down, I could easily run for an hour at a time. Now I'm up to a 4mph long run pace and I can do 1 mile sprints in 13 minutes 16 seconds and getting faster everyday. I run 6 days a week in that alternating pattern which was suggested by my nutritionist. 1 hour runs on long days and 15 minute runs followed by 30 minutes of circuit training and concluding with another 15 minute run. On circuit days I do the first 15 minute in sprints and the second one, I just keep my butt moving for 15 minutes, time be damned.

I have seen very little change in the amount of weight I lose, but the cardiac benefits are already showing. My average resting heart rate is 53 and is considered very good for my age. My lung capacity has improved exponentially and in general I feel unstoppable.

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I would also HIGHLY recommend watching the documentary From Fat to Finish Line if you haven't yet. It's on most of the streaming sites now, including iTunes to rent or buy. I watched that last year and it got me motivated to start interval running, and I have done a number of 5ks since then. After surgery, one of my big goals to work towards is to complete a 10k and then a half marathon :)

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This is a great topic. I started with C25K at the end of June and I am now running 5-6 days a week. I am following the 80/20 principle, meaning 80% of my runs are at a slow conversation pace 12:50-13:20mile, and 20% I run a bit faster 10:00-12:00 mile pace.

My long run is up to 4.5 miles. I haven't really started any sprinting work yet I just run a little faster a couple days a week in the middle of my runs. During the week I usually run 30-40 minutes and on Sundays I run 60-90 minutes. The cardiovascular system develops much faster then the muscle and skeletal systems so slower is always better. My resting heart rate averages 50, but I have many instances in the high 40's.

I think the key is to go slow, but how fast you progress is probably more of an individual thing. I am just listening to my body and staying away from really fast sprinting until I have a year of consistent running on my feet. I am 49 and don't want an injury to sideline me. My reading tells me that it is the speed work that usually results in the most injuries so my advice is to run slowly and consistently giving yourself time to recover.

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I picked 7mph because 6mph is jogging (and I thought we were talking about running), and an Army PT test (for a 45 year old soldier) has him running 2 miles at 6.5mph. I just rounded up.

But sure.. jogging 4mph is awesome too ;)

My heart rate is around 80ish and walking 3mph gets me almost breathless.. so.. yeah....

FL*Girl and Apple1 like this 2 Like this

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42 minutes ago, Berry78 said:

I picked 7mph because 6mph is jogging (and I thought we were talking about running), and an Army PT test (for a 45 year old soldier) has him running 2 miles at 6.5mph. I just rounded up.

But sure.. jogging 4mph is awesome too ;)

My heart rate is around 80ish and walking 3mph gets me almost breathless.. so.. yeah....

That is pretty fast for anyone that hasn’t been running consistently for a good while. I have been running since June and I still don’t feel comfortable running that fast for 3 miles. I just wouldn’t want anyone to injure themselves. Jogging is running slow..lol

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Yeah.. the 10% increases really seem to ratchet up the speed very quickly. 3 months getting up to 4mph, and only another 3 getting it up to 7.

I dunno. I'll try it out myself since I'm out of shape but otherwise healthy, and am only about 50lbs from goal. So I'll give it a shot and see what happens... seeya in 7 months.. lol! ;)

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I say "running" is any speed that's not walking and that slow is totally fine! And do couch to 5k at any speed you like, I couldn't do a 5k in the 30 mins at the end of the program! I just kept building from the base it gave me which was running for 30 mins without stopping. I didn't break 30 mins for a 5k for a full six months.


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And yes on from fat to finish line!!! They have a Facebook group too! I suggest anyone who wants to try running join it and perhaps try coach rik's run your first mile program it's slower than couch to 5k.

Great group of folks I've run Ragnar's with several of them!


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1 hour ago, Berry78 said:

Yeah.. the 10% increases really seem to ratchet up the speed very quickly. 3 months getting up to 4mph, and only another 3 getting it up to 7.

I dunno. I'll try it out myself since I'm out of shape but otherwise healthy, and am only about 50lbs from goal. So I'll give it a shot and see what happens... seeya in 7 months.. lol! ;)

I think it is great that you are starting to run!! Welcome to the club :) I warn you it is addictive..lol but that is a good thing.

I caution you to start slow.. really listen to your body. I would just concentrate on being able to run slow for increasing amounts of time and leave the speed for much later once your fitness catches up a little with your brain...lol..

I am very cautious when I run fast because I don't want to end up pulling a muscle. That is just me though. Have fun.

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