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I feel like I have one but my surgeon just shrugged the idea away. My pain is excruciating in the center between breasts. Very sensitive to hit/cold. The first thing I swallow each morning burns so much and then i feel like i get diarrhea from the pain.

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Search under ulcer @AlteredReality posted about her experience, she was in the hospital for a few days. If you are not feeling well I suggest you contact your PCP.

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Generally if you develop an ulcer, you will find it difficult to keep food down and experience incessant nausea and vomiting. But these symptoms can also happen if you develop a stricture.

According to the internet:

Nausea and vomiting are the most common complaints after bariatric surgery, and they are typically associated with inappropriate diet and noncompliance with a gastroplasty diet (ie, eat undisturbed, chew meticulously, never drink with meals, and wait 2 hours before drinking after solid food is consumed). If these symptoms are associated with epigastric pain, significant dehydration, or not explained by dietary indiscretions, an alternative diagnosis must be explored. One of the most common complications causing nausea and vomiting in gastric bypass patients is anastomotic ulcers, with and without stomal stenosis. Ulceration or stenosis at the gastrojejunostomy of the gastric bypass has a reported incidence of 3% to 20%. Although no unifying explanation for the etiology of anastomotic ulcers exists, most experts agree that the pathogenesis is likely multifactorial. These ulcers are thought to be due to a combination of preserved acid secretion in the pouch, tension from the Roux limb, ischemia from the operation, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use, and perhaps Helicobacter pylori infection. Evidence suggests that little acid is secreted in the gastric bypass pouch; however, staple line dehiscence may lead to excessive acid bathing of the anastomosis. Treatment for both marginal ulcers and stomal ulcers should include avoidance of NSAIDs, antisecretory therapy with proton-pump inhibitors, and/or sucralfate. In addition, H pylori infection should be identified and treated, if present.

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Generally if you develop an ulcer, you will find it difficult to keep food down and experience incessant nausea and vomiting. But these symptoms can also happen if you develop a stricture.
According to the internet:
Nausea and vomiting are the most common complaints after bariatric surgery, and they are typically associated with inappropriate diet and noncompliance with a gastroplasty diet (ie, eat undisturbed, chew meticulously, never drink with meals, and wait 2 hours before drinking after solid food is consumed). If these symptoms are associated with epigastric pain, significant dehydration, or not explained by dietary indiscretions, an alternative diagnosis must be explored. One of the most common complications causing nausea and vomiting in gastric bypass patients is anastomotic ulcers, with and without stomal stenosis. Ulceration or stenosis at the gastrojejunostomy of the gastric bypass has a reported incidence of 3% to 20%. Although no unifying explanation for the etiology of anastomotic ulcers exists, most experts agree that the pathogenesis is likely multifactorial. These ulcers are thought to be due to a combination of preserved acid secretion in the pouch, tension from the Roux limb, ischemia from the operation, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use, and perhaps Helicobacter pylori infection. Evidence suggests that little acid is secreted in the gastric bypass pouch; however, staple line dehiscence may lead to excessive acid bathing of the anastomosis. Treatment for both marginal ulcers and stomal ulcers should include avoidance of NSAIDs, antisecretory therapy with proton-pump inhibitors, and/or sucralfate. In addition, H pylori infection should be identified and treated, if present.
It was just one very large ulcer. No stricture. I had a CT scan, ultrasound and EGD that showed only one ulcer that was 2 inches in size. Had nothing to do with nsaids, because I stopped taking those close to 3 months before I ever had surgery.

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4 hours ago, James Marusek said:

wait 2 hours before drinking after solid food is consumed

This part always cracks me up when you post it. :lol:

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This part always cracks me up when you post it. [emoji38]

2 hours [emoji1496]‍♀️...nope I will stick to the recommend 30 minutes [emoji23]

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I feel like I have one but my surgeon just shrugged the idea away. My pain is excruciating in the center between breasts. Very sensitive to hit/cold. The first thing I swallow each morning burns so much and then i feel like i get diarrhea from the pain.
Make an appointment to see a gastroenterologist. I went through the same thing and it turned out to be an ulcer...a large one

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Has anyone developed an ulcer? If so, where did it hurt ?
Mine hurt just below my rib cage on the left. I could tell it was around the connection point of my small intestine and my new pouch. It would hurt when I drank it ate. The only comfort I would get was to slowly sip hot chamomile tea. After not being able to hold down food or Water too many days in a row, due to the pain triggering me to vomit...I quickly went to the emergency room and was admitted within 2 hours of my arrival. Stayed in the hospital for 5 days.

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6 hours ago, AlteredReality said:

Mine hurt just below my rib cage on the left. I could tell it was around the connection point of my small intestine and my new pouch. It would hurt when I drank it ate. The only comfort I would get was to slowly sip hot chamomile tea. After not being able to hold down food or Water too many days in a row, due to the pain triggering me to vomit...I quickly went to the emergency room and was admitted within 2 hours of my arrival. Stayed in the hospital for 5 days.

Thanks for sharing your experience. You will undoubtedly be helping people going through the same thing. Sometimes these forums are more valuable than the doctor-patient relationship.

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I called my dr and told him to just listen to me for a moment. I am positive i have an ulcer. I experienced this exact pain when i was banded. He called in a script for carafate and protonix. So its been 12 hours and i kinda restarted eating bland again. I need to heal. Hopefully i will feel better soon.

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