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Constant Struggles and Vomitting/Nasuea/Illness in general???



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So I had my surgery in November 2018, since then I've remained sick. The first couple of weeks went fine aside from some nausea and pain. Now three months, almost four after surgery and I'm struggling to keep food and liquid down and continually get sick with every cold, bronchitis and pneumonia. The only food I can handle seems to be nuts, cheese, red meat, and Beans. Everything else comes right up, not only is this painful but it's annoying and worrisome. I've had several problems, I had this happen before and had to have a PICC line put in my arm (an IV line meant to stay in you for weeks to months or a year if needed) to give me my Vitamins and nutrients I need. I had it for about a week and then was able to eat again, then found out I have a DVT (a blood clot deep in a vein), then got bronchitis twice and got pneumonia. Now I'm not only throwing up again but I'm getting sick again and my doctor thinks that I'm throwing up from what I'm eating. I can't eat much, I eat about 1/2 a cup of food for a meal if even. I'm just wondering if anyone else has had any of these kinds of problems??? If you have what did your doctor suggest, did you try to substitute foods with other items? Surely I can't live off just meat, cheese, and nuts.

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When I stopped taking my omeprazile I had those issues am taking Pantrozole now and it is better.

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I was taking omeprazole but it hurt my stomach. I took protonix instead and did fine. I'm back to omeprazole now and not doing so good maybe I need to go back to protonix. Thanks for responding [emoji16]

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I had RNY gastric bypass surgery whereas you had the sleeve. There are some similarities. The three most important elements after RNY gastric bypass surgery are to meet your daily Protein, Fluid and Vitamin requirements. food is secondary because your body is converting your stored fat into the energy that drives your body. So how are you doing on meeting your daily protein, fluid and vitamin requirements? Generally when you eat a minimal amount of food, the protein requirement is met by Protein Shakes. I was consuming around 3 per day for the first several months after surgery.

According to the internet:

Nausea and vomiting are the most common complaints after bariatric surgery, and they are typically associated with inappropriate diet and noncompliance with a gastroplasty diet (ie, eat undisturbed, chew meticulously, never drink with meals, and wait 2 hours before drinking after solid food is consumed). If these symptoms are associated with epigastric pain, significant dehydration, or not explained by dietary indiscretions, an alternative diagnosis must be explored. One of the most common complications causing nausea and vomiting in gastric bypass patients is anastomotic ulcers, with and without stomal stenosis. Ulceration or stenosis at the gastrojejunostomy of the gastric bypass has a reported incidence of 3% to 20%. Although no unifying explanation for the etiology of anastomotic ulcers exists, most experts agree that the pathogenesis is likely multifactorial. These ulcers are thought to be due to a combination of preserved acid secretion in the pouch, tension from the Roux limb, ischemia from the operation, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use, and perhaps Helicobacter pylori infection. Evidence suggests that little acid is secreted in the gastric bypass pouch; however, staple line dehiscence may lead to excessive acid bathing of the anastomosis. Treatment for both marginal ulcers and stomal ulcers should include avoidance of NSAIDs, antisecretory therapy with proton-pump inhibitors, and/or sucralfate. In addition, H pylori infection should be identified and treated, if present.

So this has 3 parts to it. From what you said you are taking a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazile). Have you restricted yourself from using NSAIDs? Aspirin and Excedrin are just a few common items that are NSAIDs. Have you ever been checked for Helicobacter pylori infection. It is fairly common. About fifty percent of the people in the world have this infection and it is a hard one to kill.

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Wait 2 hours after eating before drinking? That’s taking things a bit far

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I had RNY gastric bypass surgery whereas you had the sleeve. There are some similarities. The three most important elements after RNY gastric bypass surgery are to meet your daily Protein, Fluid and Vitamin requirements. food is secondary because your body is converting your stored fat into the energy that drives your body. So how are you doing on meeting your daily protein, fluid and vitamin requirements? Generally when you eat a minimal amount of food, the protein requirement is met by Protein Shakes. I was consuming around 3 per day for the first several months after surgery.
According to the internet:
Nausea and vomiting are the most common complaints after bariatric surgery, and they are typically associated with inappropriate diet and noncompliance with a gastroplasty diet (ie, eat undisturbed, chew meticulously, never drink with meals, and wait 2 hours before drinking after solid food is consumed). If these symptoms are associated with epigastric pain, significant dehydration, or not explained by dietary indiscretions, an alternative diagnosis must be explored. One of the most common complications causing nausea and vomiting in gastric bypass patients is anastomotic ulcers, with and without stomal stenosis. Ulceration or stenosis at the gastrojejunostomy of the gastric bypass has a reported incidence of 3% to 20%. Although no unifying explanation for the etiology of anastomotic ulcers exists, most experts agree that the pathogenesis is likely multifactorial. These ulcers are thought to be due to a combination of preserved acid secretion in the pouch, tension from the Roux limb, ischemia from the operation, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use, and perhaps Helicobacter pylori infection. Evidence suggests that little acid is secreted in the gastric bypass pouch; however, staple line dehiscence may lead to excessive acid bathing of the anastomosis. Treatment for both marginal ulcers and stomal ulcers should include avoidance of NSAIDs, antisecretory therapy with proton-pump inhibitors, and/or sucralfate. In addition, H pylori infection should be identified and treated, if present.
So this has 3 parts to it. From what you said you are taking a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazile). Have you restricted yourself from using NSAIDs? Aspirin and Excedrin are just a few common items that are NSAIDs. Have you ever been checked for Helicobacter pylori infection. It is fairly common. About fifty percent of the people in the world have this infection and it is a hard one to kill.

I've never had that infection pylori, maybe I should be checked. My fluid intake is fine as is my protein and Vitamins. I have to take Tylenol for the pain from my blood clot when it gets to much to handle, otherwise I don't take NSAIDs. If I waited two hours to drink I'd be up way to late to drink all my Water. I eat very tiny amounts throughout the day, which my doctor said is fine until I hit around one year post op because it's taking me so long to adjust. He seems to think it's my diet as well but I'm not sure why, I don't eat sugar at all anymore I avoid high fats and I don't eat bread or the likes anymore I also still use protein shakes usually one to two a day.so I don't think it's my diet at all. I had a problem with my stomach not emptying all the way causing bile build up and the food to remain in my stomach and took a medicine to help that but now I'm getting the same symptoms back. I'll mention the pylori thing at my next appointment.

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8 hours ago, JaminJ said:

I've never had that infection pylori, maybe I should be checked. My Fluid intake is fine as is my Protein and Vitamins. I have to take Tylenol for the pain from my blood clot when it gets to much to handle, otherwise I don't take NSAIDs. If I waited two hours to drink I'd be up way to late to drink all my Water. I eat very tiny amounts throughout the day, which my doctor said is fine until I hit around one year post op because it's taking me so long to adjust. He seems to think it's my diet as well but I'm not sure why, I don't eat sugar at all anymore I avoid high fats and I don't eat bread or the likes anymore I also still use protein shakes usually one to two a day.so I don't think it's my diet at all. I had a problem with my stomach not emptying all the way causing bile build up and the food to remain in my stomach and took a medicine to help that but now I'm getting the same symptoms back. I'll mention the pylori thing at my next appointment.

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So it sounds like you are meeting your daily requirements for protein, Vitamins and fluids. So that is the important thing. From what you said I do not think you have a stricture.

A main part of the problems that you experienced was due to the blood clot that made its way to your lungs, a pulmonary embolism. This was a life threatening condition. You experienced bronchitis twice and got pneumonia. This would be my main focus.

According to the Internet:

Your treatment for a pulmonary embolism depends on the size and location of the blood clot. If the problem is minor and caught early, your doctor may recommend medication as treatment. Some drugs can break up small clots.

Drugs your doctor may prescribe include:

- anticoagulants: Also called blood thinners, the drugs heparin and warfarin prevent new clots from forming in your blood. They can save your life in an emergency situation.

- clot dissolvers (thrombolytics): These drugs speed up the breakdown of a clot. They’re typically reserved for emergency situations because side effects may include dangerous bleeding problems.

Surgery may be necessary to remove problematic clots, especially those that restrict blood flow to the lungs or heart. According to the mayo Clinic, some surgical procedures your doctor may use in the case of a pulmonary embolism include:

- vein filter: Your doctor will make a small incision, then use a thin wire to install a small filter in your inferior vena cava. The vena cava is the main vein that leads from your legs to the right side of your heart. The filter prevents blood clots from traveling from your legs to your lungs.

- clot removal: A thin tube called a catheter will suction large clots out of your artery. It isn’t an entirely effective method because of the difficulty involved, so it’s not always a preferred method of treatment.

- open surgery: Doctors use open surgery only in emergency situations when a person is in shock or medications aren’t working to break up the clot.

Source: https://www.healthline.com/health/pulmonary-embolus#treatment

So I suspect that you were on medicine to dissolve away the blood clot. Once it has been taken care off they probably put you on some medicine to prevent new blood clots from forming. The article also mentioned two other things that are critically important for you. These are wearing compression stockings and exercising (such as walking 30 minutes per day).

Now back on the food issue. In my case I went for over a year with minimal food intake. I lost almost half my weight in 7 months. My body converted my stored fat into the energy that drove my body. So long as I met the other requirements fluids, vitamins, and protein, my body was just fine with the minimal food intake. That was over 5 years ago and I am just fine.

From my perspective, I found the transition to solid foods (such as chicken and steaks) to be difficult so I relied on softer foods (such as Soups and chili) and still do to a large extent. These are not normal chili and soups but rather home made ones that are doubly fortified with protein. As a result I reduced and stopped the Protein Shakes almost 4 years ago when I could obtain my protein from my meals. I have provided recipes for these at the end of the following article about my journey. http://www.breadandbutterscience.com/Surgery.pdf

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So it sounds like you are meeting your daily requirements for Protein, Vitamins and fluids. So that is the important thing. From what you said I do not think you have a stricture.
A main part of the problems that you experienced was due to the blood clot that made its way to your lungs, a pulmonary embolism. This was a life threatening condition. You experienced bronchitis twice and got pneumonia. This would be my main focus.
According to the Internet:
Your treatment for a pulmonary embolism depends on the size and location of the blood clot. If the problem is minor and caught early, your doctor may recommend medication as treatment. Some drugs can break up small clots.
Drugs your doctor may prescribe include:
- anticoagulants: Also called blood thinners, the drugs heparin and warfarin prevent new clots from forming in your blood. They can save your life in an emergency situation.
- clot dissolvers (thrombolytics): These drugs speed up the breakdown of a clot. They’re typically reserved for emergency situations because side effects may include dangerous bleeding problems.
Surgery may be necessary to remove problematic clots, especially those that restrict blood flow to the lungs or heart. According to the mayo Clinic, some surgical procedures your doctor may use in the case of a pulmonary embolism include:
- vein filter: Your doctor will make a small incision, then use a thin wire to install a small filter in your inferior vena cava. The vena cava is the main vein that leads from your legs to the right side of your heart. The filter prevents blood clots from traveling from your legs to your lungs.
- clot removal: A thin tube called a catheter will suction large clots out of your artery. It isn’t an entirely effective method because of the difficulty involved, so it’s not always a preferred method of treatment.
- open surgery: Doctors use open surgery only in emergency situations when a person is in shock or medications aren’t working to break up the clot.
Source: https://www.healthline.com/health/pulmonary-embolus#treatment
So I suspect that you were on medicine to dissolve away the blood clot. Once it has been taken care off they probably put you on some medicine to prevent new blood clots from forming. The article also mentioned two other things that are critically important for you. These are wearing compression stockings and exercising (such as walking 30 minutes per day).
Now back on the food issue. In my case I went for over a year with minimal food intake. I lost almost half my weight in 7 months. My body converted my stored fat into the energy that drove my body. So long as I met the other requirements fluids, Vitamins, and protein, my body was just fine with the minimal food intake. That was over 5 years ago and I am just fine.
From my perspective, I found the transition to solid foods (such as chicken and steaks) to be difficult so I relied on softer foods (such as Soups and chili) and still do to a large extent. These are not normal chili and Soups but rather home made ones that are doubly fortified with protein. As a result I reduced and stopped the Protein Shakes almost 4 years ago when I could obtain my protein from my meals. I have provided recipes for these at the end of the following article about my journey. http://www.breadandbutterscience.com/Surgery.pdf
Thank you so much! My doctor has put me on blood thinners for the clot, I may try and go back to homemade soups and chili for a while. Thanks for including the recipes that will be really helpful! I do typically walk for at least ten minutes so I can make sure I keep my blood flowin as they say.

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Two other thoughts passed through my mind.

1. It is important to take a regiment of Probiotics anytime you were treated with antibiotics. Antibiotics not only kill the bad bacteria but also destroy your good gut bacteria. It is important to restore these colonies and you accomplish this with probiotics.

2. You may also be suffering from the effects of GERD. You are taking proton-pump inhibitors so that should help to keep that under control. There are various types of proton-pump inhibitors and some patients respond better to one form of treatment than another. Pantrozole vs. omeprazile vs. protonix vs. others. Work with you doctor and find the best fix for you.

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Wow @James Marusek! Great great responses!!!

Sorry OP for the troubles you are having!! One thing to also bring up...is that GERD has a strong component in lung health or unhealth.

GERD contributes or can cause pneumonia (from aspiration and micro aspirations of acid and food). It also keeps too much mucus going and can cause your body to ramp up the inflammatory process. All of it increases asthma/colds/pneumonia/infection, etc.

My GI guy wants me to take my 40mg of prescription omeprazole by emptying the capsule onto a single teaspoon of unsweetened applesauce cuz it's easier absorbed. Since doing that, I feel my esophagus feeling better and my cough going away again.

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Wow [mention=213093]James Marusek[/mention]! Great great responses!!!
Sorry OP for the troubles you are having!! One thing to also bring up...is that GERD has a strong component in lung health or unhealth.
GERD contributes or can cause pneumonia (from aspiration and micro aspirations of acid and food). It also keeps too much mucus going and can cause your body to ramp up the inflammatory process. All of it increases asthma/colds/pneumonia/infection, etc.
My GI guy wants me to take my 40mg of prescription omeprazole by emptying the capsule onto a single teaspoon of unsweetened applesauce cuz it's easier absorbed. Since doing that, I feel my esophagus feeling better and my cough going away again.
I may try something like that, my doctor has told me to stop my Vitamins and use a patch to help get rid of the nausea he feels the Vitamin is a huge contributor to that. I think I have problems with the capsule part of the pills so maybe from here on I should sprinkle it on applesauce instead. Thanks for responding!

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I am really sorry. No advice, but I am in a similar place. Sleeved on 10/29. I'm nauseated 90% of the time and have reflux 100% of the time. Luckily, I haven't thrown up yet. I just feel like I need to. And I can eat less now than I could about a month out. Just got off the phone with my doc's nurse and looks like more testing is in order. As I was crying and saying how much I regretted this decision, she told me "This is not my life, this will pass." I just need that to be my mantra for now.

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I am really sorry. No advice, but I am in a similar place. Sleeved on 10/29. I'm nauseated 90% of the time and have reflux 100% of the time. Luckily, I haven't thrown up yet. I just feel like I need to. And I can eat less now than I could about a month out. Just got off the phone with my doc's nurse and looks like more testing is in order. As I was crying and saying how much I regretted this decision, she told me "This is not my life, this will pass." I just need that to be my mantra for now.
That's a good mantra, I need to keep telling myself that too. Two of my Vitamins are low and my stomach still won't empty on its own so more meds for that, no food for the next few days for me I need more Water because the doctor said my nausea could be due to dehydration. So it's just a matter of trying to pin point the problem. I hope it starts to get easier for you soon, I keep thinking and saying "I regret this it wasn't worth it" but it will be, I won't die young from a heart attack like all the women on my biological fathers side. I hope it gets easier for you!

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So I had my surgery in November 2018, since then I've remained sick. The first couple of weeks went fine aside from some nausea and pain. Now three months, almost four after surgery and I'm struggling to keep food and liquid down and continually get sick with every cold, bronchitis and pneumonia. The only food I can handle seems to be nuts, cheese, red meat, and Beans. Everything else comes right up, not only is this painful but it's annoying and worrisome. I've had several problems, I had this happen before and had to have a PICC line put in my arm (an IV line meant to stay in you for weeks to months or a year if needed) to give me my Vitamins and nutrients I need. I had it for about a week and then was able to eat again, then found out I have a DVT (a blood clot deep in a vein), then got bronchitis twice and got pneumonia. Now I'm not only throwing up again but I'm getting sick again and my doctor thinks that I'm throwing up from what I'm eating. I can't eat much, I eat about 1/2 a cup of food for a meal if even. I'm just wondering if anyone else has had any of these kinds of problems??? If you have what did your doctor suggest, did you try to substitute foods with other items? Surely I can't live off just meat, cheese, and nuts.
Oh, I just had an ultrasound and have gallstones now, great.

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Oh, I just had an ultrasound and have gallstones now, great.

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Oh my goodness I imagine that's painful and a bit of an irritation. I read somewhere that that can be common after getting sleeved. I hope everything goes okay for you! I just can't catch a break either[emoji24]

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