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It's not "one size fits all". Discuss this with your nutritionist or doctor. Factors that effect the number of calories you should consume: your weight loss goals, your height, frame size, gender and activity level.

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As noted, it can be very individual, but my gut feel from being around these places for years is that it high for the majority of people. I was probably touching that sometimes at that point, but I was losing 10 lb per month consistently and within 10 lb of my goal weight, so I was trying to ramp up my consumption to slow my loss and ease into maintenance (and I have a guy's metabolism, which tends to let us get away with more.) How is your weight loss going? How close to goal are you? Do you have any idea how much you were consuming before surgery when your weight was stable (i.e. what was your total metabolism)? For many people, 1500 calories, give or take a bit, will be their maintenance level.

In short, your current loss rate and how far you are to goal should be the major determining factors. Also, be aware that typically, our loss rate tends to decrease over time as our total metabolism tends to decline as we lose weight (it simply takes fewer calories to move 200 lb around than 200, and fewer still to move 150 lb, etc., so it is usually best to avoid increasing our intake over time until we are ready to stop losing.

Good luck,

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As noted, it can be very individual, but my gut feel from being around these places for years is that it high for the majority of people. I was probably touching that sometimes at that point, but I was losing 10 lb per month consistently and within 10 lb of my goal weight, so I was trying to ramp up my consumption to slow my loss and ease into maintenance (and I have a guy's metabolism, which tends to let us get away with more.) How is your weight loss going? How close to goal are you? Do you have any idea how much you were consuming before surgery when your weight was stable (i.e. what was your total metabolism)? For many people, 1500 calories, give or take a bit, will be their maintenance level.
In short, your current loss rate and how far you are to goal should be the major determining factors. Also, be aware that typically, our loss rate tends to decrease over time as our total metabolism tends to decline as we lose weight (it simply takes fewer calories to move 200 lb around than 200, and fewer still to move 150 lb, etc., so it is usually best to avoid increasing our intake over time until we are ready to stop losing.
Good luck,

My weightloss rate is going okay i lost 90ish pound and still have 45 pound to go am 5ft 4 i was 289lb ! I work out 4 to 5 times a week swimming weight lifting 3 times before hitting the pool am just worried because i found myself tolerating more food these days, and recently i found myself reaching 1500 in the bad days not the best foods or Nutirtion dense things, snacking and stuff found it's way back to my diet and am scared emotional eating is a b*tch and i thought i managed it the past few monthes but i guess i was wrong !

Sent from my DUB-LX1 using BariatricPal mobile app

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That sounds fairly normal - we can usually eat more volume as time progresses. This doc gives a fairly common progression from his experience, and it is consistent with mine:

I think that one of the key factors over this time - the later months of our loss phase - it's not what we can eat, but what we should eat. I could probably eaten more, but I continued to weigh and measure what I was eating, and maintaining consistency on that until I needed to increase my intake to slow things down and go into maintenance. It looks like you know where your weaknesses are, and that is what you need to work on in the long term, or they can take over again.

This doc has some good ideas for the long term (though I don't buy everything he says - still not sure about his green smoothies!) but my takeaway from it is to fill that additional capacity that you are finding with bulkier, high nutrition, lower calorie veg as a means to keeping your calories under control as your capacity increases. Once you get to goal, you can shift things some towards lower nutritional density foods to increase calories to stabilize things. I continue to do that, with a menu that has a spectrum of foods with varying nutritional densities, I can make adjustments as needed to increase or decrease my calorie intake to keep things stable. Note that lower nutritional density does not necessarily mean junkier food, but ones that still have good nutritional value, but just higher in calories - think either higher fat content foods or some of the starches or whole grains - still good useful food, but less dense nutritionally than say, green veg or lean meats.

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That sounds fairly normal - we can usually eat more volume as time progresses. This doc gives a fairly common progression from his experience, and it is consistent with mine:
[/url] I think that one of the key factors over this time - the later months of our loss phase - it's not what we can eat, but what we should eat. I could probably eaten more, but I continued to weigh and measure what I was eating, and maintaining consistency on that until I needed to increase my intake to slow things down and go into maintenance. It looks like you know where your weaknesses are, and that is what you need to work on in the long term, or they can take over again.
This doc has some good ideas for the long term (though I don't buy everything he says - still not sure about his green smoothies!) but my takeaway from it is to fill that additional capacity that you are finding with bulkier, high nutrition, lower calorie veg as a means to keeping your calories under control as your capacity increases. Once you get to goal, you can shift things some towards lower nutritional density foods to increase calories to stabilize things. I continue to do that, with a menu that has a spectrum of foods with varying nutritional densities, I can make adjustments as needed to increase or decrease my calorie intake to keep things stable. Note that lower nutritional density does not necessarily mean junkier
food , but ones that still have good nutritional value, but just higher in calories - think either higher fat content foods or some of the starches or whole grains - still good useful food, but less dense nutritionally than say, green veg or lean  meats .

I still weigh my food and track my calories and cook all my meals, what got me scared is that one day got to 1500 calorie!
I snack one day in the week, now it got a little out of control!
Dr vang is kinna forcing his eating habites on us.. Am on a low carb diet with healthy fats and veggies but man i love and miss carbs so much sometimes i lose control [emoji3525]

Sent from my DUB-LX1 using  BariatricPal mobile app

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