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New here, I am seriously considering weight loss surgery please help..



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Hi all,

I am seriously considering weight loss surgery as I have recently been diagnosed with PCOS and I have been bitterly unhappy with my weight for many years.

I am 34 years old, I have a BMI of 40.8 and am a size 20-22, I am 5ft 6.

I have had a referral to my Dr's from my gynaecologist suggesting some type of bariatric surgery so hopefully my Dr will refer me.

I am unsure the Pros and Cons of the different types from my research I have read the Gastric Sleeve or Bypass are the main two is this correct?

Also can I please have as many replies as possible to what surgery you have had, the pros but mainly the cons.

How long ago you had surgery, which type, how long ago, the healing process, how much weight you have lost ect anything to help I would be really grateful!

I've seen alot about only being able to eat a very small amount after surgery too is this the case with both surgeries?

TIA xx

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Ok starting with the Cons - Yes you have to adjust your life and drinking large amounts of alcahol is over. Yes there are bumps and rough times during the journey.

You have to get the surgery to save you life! Just like i had to! The reward is off the scale good and you will be happier and healthier. The surgery is a toll and you have to run the workshop, I truly feel like many here this was the best decision in my life i had made

Male - Sleeved June 19 2019 at 377 pound and weighed in Dec 27 2019 at 215 Been able to hold the weight since then to now

TRUST ME DO IT - AND IF YOU CANT GET INSURANCE TO DO IT PAY FOR IT YOURSELF - Take a loan or put it on a visa. Do not let money decide this for you, you have to decide to do it

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Hi there!

Fingers crossed for you that your referral goes smoothly and you can have a good meeting with your doctor about bariatric surgery options.

I've had two bariatric procedures. The first was in 2011 when I got Lapbanded. At that time, the only real options for me were Lapband or Bypass as insurance carriers in my area viewed Sleeve Gastrectomy as "too new" (never really got that as it was part of Duodenal Switch, but also my insurance didn't cover that outside of extreme circumstances). I chose Lapband because frankly, RNY scared the hell out of me, despite the fact that my Mom underwent it and was and remains wildly successful with it. I was younger and the thought of rerouting everything was too much for me, plus I'd seen my mom go through dumping and that also freaked me out. So I went with what felt like a good choice for me. And it was good until it wasn't. I did lose weight! Until it started coming back. And then my band slipped and I apparently developed a minor hiatal hernia from it that I likely lived with for a long while without knowing it was there. When I found out about it as part of my revision process, it suddenly made all of the regurgitation I'd suffered from for years make sense.

The Lapband is really the best option for people who are in the 30-35 BMI scale and need that extra help to get closer to what is considered healthy. It is rare that Lapband weight loss is equivalent to that of RNY, VSG, or DS. The Lapband requires a lot of upkeep because it's effectiveness is based on how filled the band is. So you will have a lot of appointments in the first year or two where your doctor adds more saline to the band to give greater restriction...takes some out to lessen the restriction...then adds more...removes some. It's all a game of finding the elusive "sweet spot" where the band is filled the right amount to allow for continued and consistent weight loss.

It is fairly common for a Lapband to slip, which present all kinds of difficulties. When it slips, it is no longer in the position is it supposed to be. Thus your pouch ends up no longer being the right size. It can also lead to hernias when it slips. Slippage CAN be fixed, but you're looking at another laparoscopic procedure so that they can put it back to the right position. Which requires removing all of the Fluid from the band, doing the procedure, and essentially starting at square one again.

That said, it is STILL a useful weight loss tool for those that it is appropriate for and who achieve success with it. There are plenty of Lapband success stories!

In July, I had revision surgery to remove my Lapband and to have a Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy done instead. I am older than I was in 2011 and realized that making major adjustments to my insides was not actually a horrible thing in light of dealing with bad knees, a bad back, sleep apnea, CPAP dependence, and the risk of onset of any number of other comorbidities that I have been fortunate to avoid. I'm only 12 weeks out as of today, so I don't have the breadth of post-op experience that others here have when it comes to VSG, but I can't say that I regret the decision. I have continued to lose weight since surgery, adding to my pre-surgery weight loss. None of my clothes fit me anymore, yet I am still wearing them because I can't see the point of shopping for new clothes when I am still losing weight. Seems like a waste of money to do that!

The cons for VSG? Strangely, I'm not encountering too many yet. I actually found I was in more pain post-op from my Lapband surgery than I was recovering from VSG. Any of the others cons I've experienced are not exclusive to VSG surgery. Almost every bariatric patient complains about dealing with constipation at some point. Discomfort from eating too much in the immediate post-op phase as I learn my body's signals and how to read them to know when to stop? We all go through that too. The biggest con that I can think of is that if I'd chosen RNY over VSG, my post-op weight loss would likely have been quicker, so I might have been down another 10-20 pounds by now, though that is not guaranteed. It is just very likely as RNY statistically has a greater percentage for weight lost than VSG.

As for what you've heard about bariatric surgery patients only being able to eat small portions, that is generally true across the board. That is one of the key features of ANY of the weight loss surgeries. It's a GOOD thing, though. Many people get to the point where they consider these surgeries because of eating too much. It's an unfortunate aspect of how many world cultures have evolved when it comes to food. The US is probably the worst about it. Think about when you go out to eat at a restaurant, especially a chain restaurant. You open the menu and you get a list of appetizers in your face to tempt you. So we order an appetizer or two. Then we order our entree which comes to the table is a massive sized portion that is, realistically, enough food for at least 2 people. Yet we're trained to believe that this is an appropriate portion of food. Let alone the fact that it's frequently overloaded with carbs and fat. So between appetizers and your entree, you've probably eaten 3 meals worth in one sitting. On top of everything else you ate that day.

So by getting a surgery that provides you with a tool that limits how much you can eat at a given time, you're able to retrain your body and brain to realize exactly what and how much the human body needs to survive and thrive. A good bariatric team will be there to help you change your relationship with food so that every meal and snack you eat during the day, provides you with the good nutrients that the body needs, while limiting the intake of the "bad" ones that the body still needs, but only in the quantities that it needs. Carbs and fats are not actually bad. The body needs them to survive. It just doesn't need them in the quantities that we frequently take in.

It is NOT an easy journey, but it is a deeply rewarding and fulfilling one that will, quite literally, change your life.

Welcome aboard and I look forward to seeing your journey and offering support every step of the way!

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3 hours ago, janeabelle said:

Hi all,
I am seriously considering weight loss surgery as I have recently been diagnosed with PCOS and I have been bitterly unhappy with my weight for many years.
I am 34 years old, I have a BMI of 40.8 and am a size 20-22, I am 5ft 6.
I have had a referral to my Dr's from my gynaecologist suggesting some type of bariatric surgery so hopefully my Dr will refer me.
I am unsure the Pros and Cons of the different types from my research I have read the Gastric Sleeve or Bypass are the main two is this correct?
Also can I please have as many replies as possible to what surgery you have had, the pros but mainly the cons.
How long ago you had surgery, which type, how long ago, the healing process, how much weight you have lost ect anything to help I would be really grateful!
I've seen alot about only being able to eat a very small amount after surgery too is this the case with both surgeries?
TIA xx

Hey hey! Ull be glad to know we have similar starting stats! I am 31 years old, had a BMI of 40.67 and was a size 18-20. I was 252lbs at my highest (10 days prior to vertical gastric sleeve surgery) and I was 242lbs on 7.27.20 (day of surgery). I am 5ft 6. I am 2 months post op now. Already i am down to 206lbs. I have lost 45lbs in total and 35 in two months since surgery.my bmi is 33.25 at the moment. I no longer have hip and back pain, my face is back to looking like "myself" again, I wake up happy every single day now and don't feel like I need to to hide away inside the house because of shame. I wear a size 16 at the moment. I have always had a big butt. Washing and wiping my own butt before surgery had started getting difficult which was one of my main wake up calls. I no longer have any issues with this at all only two months out! I could go on and on. There are sooooo many pros to having wls of any kind! My husband was skeptical that wls was necessary and wanted me to diet and work out with him for another year before we considered "something so drastic"..he now agrees this is exactly what I needed and is glad we didn't wait another year of me feeling the way I did about myself. As far as recovery, it was very easy for me. Sharp pain from incision sutures for abt a week, maybe 1.5 weeks. Within 2 weeks I had no pain. Can eat very little (have to remind myself to eat bc im not hungry and it seems kind of tedious to eat now bc its only like 4-5 bites of something) and i have no desire to eat sweets or junk anymore. That is huge for me bc I would easily and regularly consume Cookies, brownies, candy bars, chips and crackers by the box/package by myself in just a few days. I craved Snacks all day everyday. The only "con" i am experiencing is that i loved Water before surgery and chugged it all day everyday. Now it's another thing i have to remind myself to do and it feels so tedious because i can only sip water now, not chug. Oh oops i forgot.. Vitamins and meds are another "con" for me because I was not any meds prior to sleeve surgery and didnt take vitamins. Now i take like 3 meds and vitamins daily. My stomach is so small it feels as tho I've eaten after just taking my meds. I used to be able to throw back 3 Tylenols and swallow at once but now i take each pill one at a time because i feel like im gonna choke on the smallest pill size. I think this is just a fear tho..like a mental thing..and not actually a legit concern or something that is experienced by others lol. Anyways, i hope i covered enough for u. If u have any other questions, feel free to ask. Im an open book and wish i had found this app when i was preop. I did find TONS of videos on YouTube that convinced me sleeve surgery was just as good of an option as bypass for me tho! The videos I watched showed sleevers years out remaining successful and losing over 100lbs. The videos showed me ppl experiencing restriction and maintaining their goal weight years out which proved to me that bypass wasn't necessary for me to reach my 100lb weight loss goal and maintain it. This was encouraging for me because i was self pay and sleeve is cheaper. I would not let money be a determining factor tho. I was kind of forced into sleeve anyways because I am a smoker..still trying to quit at this point.

OHHH BTW My mother had bypass 13 years ago and has remained at her goal wait this far out. This made me believe bypass had a higher success rate because she gets dumping, forcing her to not eat certain things or too much. Many surgeons disagree abt whether sleeve patients get dumping. I can eat whatever i want post op without getting sick but obviously can only eat a small portion. Many surgeons and patients argue about whether this restriction is lifted a few years out but there are ppl on here who will tell you they still have restriction with sleeve years out so it's hard to know what each of our bodies will experience. Do your research, watch youtube vids, listen to what people have to say, but most importantly choose a good bariatric team and trust your surgeon!
Sent from my SM-N960U using BariatricPal mobile app

Edited by regina r

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gastric bypass and the sleeve are the two most common weight loss surgeries. If you have issues with GERD, bypass is usually recommended since it often improves or even cures GERD, whereas the sleeve can make it worse (it doesn't happen to everyone - or even a majority of patients, but it's common enough that they'll usually recommend bypass if you have it). If you don't have GERD, it really comes down to personal preference.

I had RNY (bypass) over five years ago. I've been very happy with it and would do it again in a heartbeat. I originally lost 235 lbs but have gained about 15 lbs since then (it's very common to have a 10-20 lb rebound after hitting your lowest weight).

you do have to eat very small amounts while you're in weight loss mode - but this isn't as hard as it sounds because you have a much smaller stomach, and also, most people lose their hunger for a few months after surgery (unfortunately, it does eventually come back for most of us). However, most of us can eat more once we hit our goal. I've been in maintenance for 3.5 years and can maintain my weight if I stick to about 1700 calories a day. This is really about the same as a lot of my never-been-obese female friends. When I go out to eat, I'll either order an appetizer or if I do get an entree, I'll take half of it home with me. A lot of my women friends do the same, so I'm sure no one can tell at this point that I've had surgery.

Good luck with your decision. I've been really happy with mine and should have done this YEARS ago!

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46 minutes ago, Pandemonium said:

Hi there!

Fingers crossed for you that your referral goes smoothly and you can have a good meeting with your doctor about bariatric surgery options.

I've had two bariatric procedures. The first was in 2011 when I got Lapbanded. At that time, the only real options for me were Lapband or Bypass as insurance carriers in my area viewed Sleeve Gastrectomy as "too new" (never really got that as it was part of Duodenal Switch, but also my insurance didn't cover that outside of extreme circumstances). I chose Lapband because frankly, RNY scared the hell out of me, despite the fact that my Mom underwent it and was and remains wildly successful with it. I was younger and the thought of rerouting everything was too much for me, plus I'd seen my mom go through dumping and that also freaked me out. So I went with what felt like a good choice for me. And it was good until it wasn't. I did lose weight! Until it started coming back. And then my band slipped and I apparently developed a minor hiatal hernia from it that I likely lived with for a long while without knowing it was there. When I found out about it as part of my revision process, it suddenly made all of the regurgitation I'd suffered from for years make sense.

The Lapband is really the best option for people who are in the 30-35 BMI scale and need that extra help to get closer to what is considered healthy. It is rare that Lapband weight loss is equivalent to that of RNY, VSG, or DS. The Lapband requires a lot of upkeep because it's effectiveness is based on how filled the band is. So you will have a lot of appointments in the first year or two where your doctor adds more saline to the band to give greater restriction...takes some out to lessen the restriction...then adds more...removes some. It's all a game of finding the elusive "sweet spot" where the band is filled the right amount to allow for continued and consistent weight loss.

It is fairly common for a Lapband to slip, which present all kinds of difficulties. When it slips, it is no longer in the position is it supposed to be. Thus your pouch ends up no longer being the right size. It can also lead to hernias when it slips. Slippage CAN be fixed, but you're looking at another laparoscopic procedure so that they can put it back to the right position. Which requires removing all of the Fluid from the band, doing the procedure, and essentially starting at square one again.

That said, it is STILL a useful weight loss tool for those that it is appropriate for and who achieve success with it. There are plenty of Lapband success stories!

In July, I had revision surgery to remove my Lapband and to have a Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy done instead. I am older than I was in 2011 and realized that making major adjustments to my insides was not actually a horrible thing in light of dealing with bad knees, a bad back, sleep apnea, CPAP dependence, and the risk of onset of any number of other comorbidities that I have been fortunate to avoid. I'm only 12 weeks out as of today, so I don't have the breadth of post-op experience that others here have when it comes to VSG, but I can't say that I regret the decision. I have continued to lose weight since surgery, adding to my pre-surgery weight loss. None of my clothes fit me anymore, yet I am still wearing them because I can't see the point of shopping for new clothes when I am still losing weight. Seems like a waste of money to do that!

The cons for VSG? Strangely, I'm not encountering too many yet. I actually found I was in more pain post-op from my Lapband surgery than I was recovering from VSG. Any of the others cons I've experienced are not exclusive to VSG surgery. Almost every bariatric patient complains about dealing with constipation at some point. Discomfort from eating too much in the immediate post-op phase as I learn my body's signals and how to read them to know when to stop? We all go through that too. The biggest con that I can think of is that if I'd chosen RNY over VSG, my post-op weight loss would likely have been quicker, so I might have been down another 10-20 pounds by now, though that is not guaranteed. It is just very likely as RNY statistically has a greater percentage for weight lost than VSG.

As for what you've heard about bariatric surgery patients only being able to eat small portions, that is generally true across the board. That is one of the key features of ANY of the weight loss surgeries. It's a GOOD thing, though. Many people get to the point where they consider these surgeries because of eating too much. It's an unfortunate aspect of how many world cultures have evolved when it comes to food. The US is probably the worst about it. Think about when you go out to eat at a restaurant, especially a chain restaurant. You open the menu and you get a list of appetizers in your face to tempt you. So we order an appetizer or two. Then we order our entree which comes to the table is a massive sized portion that is, realistically, enough food for at least 2 people. Yet we're trained to believe that this is an appropriate portion of food. Let alone the fact that it's frequently overloaded with carbs and fat. So between appetizers and your entree, you've probably eaten 3 meals worth in one sitting. On top of everything else you ate that day.

So by getting a surgery that provides you with a tool that limits how much you can eat at a given time, you're able to retrain your body and brain to realize exactly what and how much the human body needs to survive and thrive. A good bariatric team will be there to help you change your relationship with food so that every meal and snack you eat during the day, provides you with the good nutrients that the body needs, while limiting the intake of the "bad" ones that the body still needs, but only in the quantities that it needs. Carbs and fats are not actually bad. The body needs them to survive. It just doesn't need them in the quantities that we frequently take in.

It is NOT an easy journey, but it is a deeply rewarding and fulfilling one that will, quite literally, change your life.

Welcome aboard and I look forward to seeing your journey and offering support every step of the way!

Hey.. I'm new to this site still and I am wondering how all of you get that cute little weight loss graph lol.

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4 minutes ago, regina r said:

Hey.. I'm new to this site still and I am wondering how all of you get that cute little weight loss graph lol.

Just messaged you!

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8 minutes ago, Pandemonium said:

Just messaged you!

Thank you!!

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Hi,

I had the gastric sleeve in March, 2019. All my cons are from immediately after surgery.

I had quite a bit of pain but it was controlled with IV and then oral pain meds.

I wasn't able to eat at all for almost 2 weeks (I mean nothing). I drank Protein drinks (not shakes but clear drinks) and that was it for about 10 days. Then I was able to drink shakes and soon I moved on to soft food and purees, etc. By 1 month out, I could eat soft regular food.

I did have some early reflux issues for the first 3 months or so but that resolved and I don't experience it now.

I had to learn what "full" feels like with my new tummy. I ate too much one time because I didn't recognize that I was full and that was totally miserable. Terrible stomach pain, nausea, I broke into a sweat and finally I threw up. I never did that again so that's the only time I have experienced that.

All my "cons" were resolved by the time I was 3 months out from surgery.

On the "pros" side, I had very little hunger after surgery and my appetite is still very low. I guess the surgery really did remove a lot of my Ghrelin-producing stomach tissue because I'm rarely hungry and when I am, it's different from that insistent, intense hunger I had pre-surgery. It's like now my body says "Excuse me, we need to eat something" where before it was saying "FEED ME NOW."

I lost slowly with the sleeve compared to others I know who had surgery but the weight loss has not stopped yet. I am still slowly losing (about 2 pounds per month) and so far I am down about 110 pounds. I am only 18 months out so I don't know what it will be like years from now, but as of now I am really pleased with my results and I don't have any current cons to report.

Edit: I did think of one current "con". I have a lot of loose skin on my abdomen. At some point, I will probably have it removed (which I will have to pay for out of pocket since it's not covered by my insurance). I guess that could be considered a con, but loose skin is better than tight fat!

Edited by Jaelzion

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6 hours ago, janeabelle said:

I am unsure the Pros and Cons of the different types from my research I have read the Gastric Sleeve or Bypass are the main two is this correct?

Also can I please have as many replies as possible to what surgery you have had, the pros but mainly the cons.

How long ago you had surgery, which type, how long ago, the healing process, how much weight you have lost ect anything to help I would be really grateful!

I've seen alot about only being able to eat a very small amount after surgery too is this the case with both surgeries?

TIA xx

I was 389 pounds with a BMI of 61.8 at my highest weight (my height is actually smack dab between 5'6 and 5'7, but they don't give you that option on this site... and I don't do the metrics system) and wore a 34-36 top and 30-32 bottoms. I was 32 years old when I had my surgery 8 months ago. I had a surgery called Loop Duodenal Switch which is generally only for those who are super morbidly obese (BMI of 50+). I was 321 pounds with a BMI of 51 on the day of my surgery and weighed in last week at 222 so in the 8 months since my surgery I've lost 99 pounds. For the first two or three weeks it was hard for me to sit down and once I was down it was hard to get up because of the pain in the stitch where they took out the majority of my stomach. I had to sleep on the couch for the first two weeks because it was too much to get into my bed. I had issues getting Fluid down for about three months, but eventually was able to get the amount I'm supposed to. I honestly didn't have an appetite at all for the first four or five months, but eventually my appetite did kick back in. And while I don't actually have to count my calories with my particular surgery I do sometimes out of curiosity and I usually get around 800 calories a day. My carb intake is usually around 60 or so a day.

The pros (according to my surgeon) is a higher average percentage of weight loss. Considering I have hypothyroidism and can't do any exercise that requires me on my feet right now due to a heath issue I really need to rely on that average percentage rate. Cons are having to take more Vitamins and consume more Protein then the other surgeries. There's also a higher risk for malnutrition and Vitamin deficiencies with my surgery (I have a Vitamin A deficiency right now). Another con is that after my surgery I vomited blood for two days which I was told was 'normal' but they didn't warn me about it at all beforehand. I have a sensitivity to sugar alcohol and it upsets my stomach. I get dumping syndrome when I eat wheat so avoid it like the plague (except when I ate something that was made in a facility that processes wheat and I didn't realize it and I made myself sick last week). If I ignore my stomach when I get hungry I get unbearably nauseous.

As for the amount you can eat... my surgery involves a sleeved stomach so I can tell you that you really don't eat much. I can usually get in about 3/4 of a cup now (about 6 oz, essentially a greek yogurt cup. I'm full after I eat one so that's about my limit). It's funny though because I used to be one of those people who would PILE food on their plate and still come back for seconds. Now my portions are tiny and if a family member asks me to make them a plate I get complaints that I give them too little lol.

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I had VSG just less than 2 weeks ago. So far the only cons I have experienced were feeling pretty crummy immediately after the surgery (maybe for an hour or 2) and then occasionally being a little sore when I overdo it. Other than that I haven't had much trouble yet and am loving watching the weight loss I experienced prior to surgery continue and even accelerate a bit after. I'm really looking forward to this journey and good luck to you with whatever you and your doctors decide.

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I've had two surgeries--a sleeve, and then a revision to RNY because I developed GERD after my sleeve. Nine years ago, I lost 100 lbs with the sleeve from a starting BMI of 36 and kept it off, so that was a big big plus. I don't recall much pain after the first two days or so, and my recovery was uneventful. The cons were that my sleeve was very picky about the foods it would tolerate. I could not eat scrambled or hard-boiled eggs. I could not eat dense Protein like tuna, salmon, or chicken breast. I could not eat Pasta, bread, or bready things because they balled up inside my stomach, absorbed stomach Fluid, and then hurt. I lived on seafood, steak, dairy products, and vegetables. I did not dump. I developed GERD a couple of years after my surgery but I loved my sleeve so much I did not want to consider a bypass, but after a year on 3x the regular prescribed dosage of PPIs plus OTC antacids that still did not control my reflux and regurgitating everything I swallowed multiple times I decided on RNY. I had my RNY on June 29 of this year, and maybe because I'm ten years older than when I had my sleeve my recovery was a little bit harder and more painful. I definitely felt like my insides had been rearranged. RNY is way different from the sleeve to me. I don't have that tight feeling anymore that I have eaten enough so I have to measure my food, but I am used to eating a small amount so it's not a big deal. I can eat eggs and pasta again. I don't dump, but I became lactose-intolerant. I lost 10 additional pounds following the RNY surgery when I was on a liquid/puree diet, but I haven't lost anymore and my BMI has leveled off at 20.

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Welcome to the forums.

While getting a referral for WLS is helpful, you can push the process yourself. You can also Doctor shop yourself, do research on the Docs and narrow down the options.

It's important that you research each of these procedures yourself, not that we won't do what we can to help.

Pros and Cons are difficult because some folks can view the same issue as a 'con' while others view it as a 'pro.' Also, some pros and cons are in relation to the other procedures. As you research each of your options, pros and cons will sort themselves out for you.

Here is a quick summary of WLS options:

LapBand: I think they are still doing these. This is a restrictive procedure where a band is wrapped around the top of the stomach. Beyond the band is your full size stomach working the way it does now. This is a low impact procedure.

Sleeve: a restrictive procedure that creates a small 'sleeve' out of your existing stomach. The sleeve runs from our esophagus to your pyloric valve. This procedure has the least impact on your plumbing. The weight loss mechanism is that the amount of food you can eat is dramatically limited;

RNY: aka 'Gastric Bypass'. This is both a restrictive and malabsorption procedure. A 'pouch' similar to the sleeve above is created out of your stomach that bypasses the pyloric valve and a portion of your intestines. The weight loss mechanism is two fold: The amount of food you can eat is dramatically limited, and what food you do eat is not absorbed completely;

DS: [There are a couple variations of DS] This apparently has changed a bit since I was paying attention 17 years ago, so I'll let the folks who know what's going on describe this for you. I do know that there is both a restrictive and malabsorption aspect to this. But the plumbing is changed a bit more.

I had RNY in 2003. I'm pretty much healed. The first two weeks were toughest for me, and by 6 weeks I was getting around pretty well. I reached goal about 2 years out. With this basic information you learn almost nothing that is important. My health is good. I am happy without the weight. I've done things that I never imagined I would do, like horseback riding, kayaking, running, 5 marathons, better marital relations, theater seats, airplane seats. The joys go on and on, and still new ones every so often.

I am unusual in that I still have not much of an appetite, still only eat smaller portions (not like immediately post op, but probably less than most people eat 2 years post-op. Don't know why it worked out this way, but I'm happy about it.

Good luck in your research and your journey thereafter.

Tek

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Gastric bypass here. My numbers were just about like yours. I had surgery at age 62, and reached goal in 7 months. Wouldn't trade my new life for anything!!!!!!!! Start reading a lot of posts. There are tons of testimonies by plenty of folks who had addressed all your concerns.

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16 hours ago, NovaLuna said:

I was 389 pounds with a BMI of 61.8 at my highest weight (my height is actually smack dab between 5'6 and 5'7, but they don't give you that option on this site... and I don't do the metrics system) and wore a 34-36 top and 30-32 bottoms. I was 32 years old when I had my surgery 8 months ago. I had a surgery called Loop Duodenal Switch which is generally only for those who are super morbidly obese (BMI of 50+). I was 321 pounds with a BMI of 51 on the day of my surgery and weighed in last week at 222 so in the 8 months since my surgery I've lost 99 pounds. For the first two or three weeks it was hard for me to sit down and once I was down it was hard to get up because of the pain in the stitch where they took out the majority of my stomach. I had to sleep on the couch for the first two weeks because it was too much to get into my bed. I had issues getting Fluid down for about three months, but eventually was able to get the amount I'm supposed to. I honestly didn't have an appetite at all for the first four or five months, but eventually my appetite did kick back in. And while I don't actually have to count my calories with my particular surgery I do sometimes out of curiosity and I usually get around 800 calories a day. My carb intake is usually around 60 or so a day.

The pros (according to my surgeon) is a higher average percentage of weight loss. Considering I have hypothyroidism and can't do any exercise that requires me on my feet right now due to a heath issue I really need to rely on that average percentage rate. Cons are having to take more Vitamins and consume more Protein then the other surgeries. There's also a higher risk for malnutrition and Vitamin deficiencies with my surgery (I have a Vitamin A deficiency right now). Another con is that after my surgery I vomited blood for two days which I was told was 'normal' but they didn't warn me about it at all beforehand. I have a sensitivity to sugar alcohol and it upsets my stomach. I get dumping syndrome when I eat wheat so avoid it like the plague (except when I ate something that was made in a facility that processes wheat and I didn't realize it and I made myself sick last week). If I ignore my stomach when I get hungry I get unbearably nauseous.

As for the amount you can eat... my surgery involves a sleeved stomach so I can tell you that you really don't eat much. I can usually get in about 3/4 of a cup now (about 6 oz, essentially a greek yogurt cup. I'm full after I eat one so that's about my limit). It's funny though because I used to be one of those people who would PILE food on their plate and still come back for seconds. Now my portions are tiny and if a family member asks me to make them a plate I get complaints that I give them too little lol.

Thank you soo much for your reply, for being very open and sharing some of your journey with me I appreciate it! I hope the issues you have now resolve quickly! One last question can I ask about excess skin if you don't mind and also are you happy you made the decision you did xx

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