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I have severe stomach acid and it wont go away it comes and goes as it pleases any body have this i dont get the heart burn and i cant throw up it just burns in my stomach any help is appreciated went to the hospital they said drink lots of 1% milk to give me a better lineing in my stomach once again any help is appreciated

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Are you taking any acid reducing medication?

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There are some good over the counter ones that you can take once a day but typically these should be used only for a short while.

I am surprised your doctor hasn't prescribed some of the stronger ones for you? Has the cause actually been investigated?

Are you pre op or post op?

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I wouldn't let that go on. Unmanaged GERD can cause Barrett's Esophagus - and a small percentage of Barrett's esophagus cases can progress to esophageal cancer. Call your bariatric surgeon or PCP. They may prescribe a PPI. Or they may just suggest an over-the-counter one, like Nexium or Prilosec (they're not cheap, though - so if your doctor prescribes one and your insurance covers it, that would be a better option)

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#1-you should be talking about this with your doctor

As someone who suffers from GERD, I can only offer you advice on what's worked for me:

  1. I take a daily proton pump inhibitor. My preference is Nexium (generic equivalent). However, there are others: Prilosec, Prevacid (available over the counter). Depending on your particular situation, H2 blockers like Pepcid and Tagamet may be effective. Again, you need to discuss with your doctor.
  2. I practice many lifestyle modifications because of it. Here are a few:
  • I limit acidic foods or those that produce acid (tomatoes, coffee, citrus, chocolate).
  • I drink LOTS of Water and herbal teas. Some of my teas are specifically geared towards digestion. Ginger is good. Pu Erh tea is good.
  • I sleep with my head elevated. We're not talking about a stack of pillows. The best is to completely incline your bed, but my hubby wasn't having that. So, I have a special wedge that I sleep on.
  • Lastly and probably most important: I NEVER EAT WITHIN 3 HOURS OF BEDTIME.
  • Other things I do: I take an apple cider vinegar capsule. There are some studies that have shown acid reflux is related to a LOW level of acid in the stomach. Strange, but true. So, a little vinegar supposedly keeps the ph balance right and keeps your stomach from overproducing acid. I also keep digestive enzymes (papaya is good) on hand, just in case I feel bloated or my food has become a rock in my gut.

Bonus: There are natural methods for treating acid reflux. They have their cons in terms that they fall in one of 2 categories. Either they are just a temporary symptom relief or they take FOREVER to notice improvement.

  1. For a rescue relief, I highly recommend a small bit of baking soda dissolved in water. I personally found almost immediate relief from this. I honestly thought it was bunk, but I was out of Tums and needed SOMETHING. This did the trick.
  2. Another rescue relief is Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL). This is not the licorice candy that you get in the store. It has been processed to reduce potential side effects like high blood pressure. I have also found this effective, but the baking soda is a much quicker relief for me.
  3. Herbalists recommend Slippery Elm for those with chronic acid reflux. There is some evidence that it helps develop a natural protective coating in the GI tract to reduce the development of ulcers. Con: you have to take A LOT of it over a long period. I'll stick with my prescription Carafate, thank you.

Last bit of advice and I'll get off my soapbox: Whoever told you to drink 1% milk for acid has done you a disservice. Dairy products in general increase mucous production and can increase your chances for GERD. So, while I wouldn't necessarily avoid them, just know that they aren't necessarily going to help any acid problems you have.

Disclaimer: The statements above are not intended to be in lieu of medical advice. Please see or speak with your doctor about your symptoms.

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Great advice @S@ssen@ch. Nexium was a big help for me too. I also avoided carbonated drinks, spicy foods & overly rich (creamy, cheesy) food. Fresh tomatoes are ok for me but tinned tomatoes tend to go through me quickly. I only drink green tea. Can’t eat close to bed time either - lots of gurgling & discomfort.

A single brick at the top of your bed is all you need to elevate you enough to get relief. My GP said increasing the number of pillows you sleep on can cause your head to bend at your neck and then the acid pools at the top of your oesophagus.

Hooe you find some relief.

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14 hours ago, Arabesque said:

I also avoided carbonated drinks, spicy foods & overly rich (creamy, cheesy) food. ... I only drink green tea.

Exactly this ^

As a rule, I avoid carbonated beverages. In 2 years, I've only had a carbonated beverage once. I had a few sips of true old-fashioned root beer. The kind made on-site at an old fashioned root beer stand. It's lower carbonation than bottled.

Also, I was told years ago that caffeine exacerbates GERD. I cut out caffeine all those years ago. So even when I did drink carbonated beverages, they were naturally non-caffeine (lemon-lime, root beer). That's the reason I primarily drink green or herbal teas. Low or no caffeine.

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