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Changing Habits Prior to Surgery



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Long story short, I'm a Lap-band patient (2009) that is going to seek revision to gastric bypass in 2020. I'm really excited and hopeful, but also have a good real of anxiety about making this surgery a success and sticking with it longterm. For a whole host of reasons, the Band isn't a good tool for me and that is why I'm seeking a more drastic surgery. While I still have some time before my new insurance policy kicks in, I want to make sure I'm taking the steps now to make post-surgery life more successful. Because this is not my first rodeo, I know to focus on Protein intake and Water. I know to limit carbs and sugars, etc.

However, I'm curious as to how many of you make it stick. I'm someone that craves a lot of sugar, unfortunately, so even if I keep my meals in check, I am easily derailed by crap food. I know what needs to be done... I just can't seem to stick to it... and I feel like I need to have that figured out before surgery. I don't want to go into surgery with these feelings because I know I won't be a good WLS candidate and I certainly won't have the success that I desperately want.

Any thoughts or advice are much appreciated!

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start now.. limit the sugars and carbs. this is a lifestyle change and not a diet. i had the sleeve so i am not sure with the RNY but i do hear a lot of ppl saying they experience dumping when eating sugar and stuff. if you train your mind now it will be much easier after surgery. my biggest thing i had to learn was to eat slowly so i didnt bring the food back up.. even now almost a year out, if i eat too fast i can only get in 3 bites or so. i have to mix veggies in with food because it seems i never get past the Protein to get to the veggies. be creative on how you want to eat and start practicing. the rule of thumb is it takes 3 weeks to make a habit and 3 days to break one. start early and often until it becomes "muscle memory" as they say in my dance class. it will become a natural habit. start giving up things like soda and such that you know you cant have after surgery, it will become much easier and be a non issue when the time comes.

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8 minutes ago, Jazzy1125 said:

start now.. limit the sugars and carbs. this is a lifestyle change and not a diet. i had the sleeve so i am not sure with the RNY but i do hear a lot of ppl saying they experience dumping when eating sugar and stuff. if you train your mind now it will be much easier after surgery. my biggest thing i had to learn was to eat slowly so i didnt bring the food back up.. even now almost a year out, if i eat too fast i can only get in 3 bites or so. i have to mix veggies in with food because it seems i never get past the Protein to get to the veggies. be creative on how you want to eat and start practicing. the rule of thumb is it takes 3 weeks to make a habit and 3 days to break one. start early and often until it becomes "muscle memory" as they say in my dance class. it will become a natural habit. start giving up things like soda and such that you know you cant have after surgery, it will become much easier and be a non issue when the time comes.

Thank you for your input! I'm working on starting now so that I am successful--I definitely need to work on eating slowly again because I have forgotten what that's like at this point. Thanks for the reminder!

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I'm pre-op too, so I can't speak for long term success, but I have been on a pre-op diet for almost 4 months and have lost over 30 lbs. At that time I instituted a healthy mind/body/spirit morning ritual that is serving me well and giving me tools that will be helpful in the next phase after my VSG surgery on November 18th.

I wake up, go to another room and meditate for 20 min, watch a YouTube video on a topic regarding personal growth, go for a 35-40 min walk and then get the day going with the family. I am learning so much and I'm developing a more positive self-confidence through this practice. It doesn't cost me anything and I feel good knowing that my self-care is paying off. During my walks, I listen to past episodes of the Weight Loss Surgery Podcast, which are incredibly helpful and informative to me. Good luck with this exciting next phase for you!

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8 minutes ago, HappyHikerGal said:

I wake up, go to another room and meditate for 20 min, watch a YouTube video on a topic regarding personal growth, go for a 35-40 min walk and then get the day going with the family. I am learning so much and I'm developing a more positive self-confidence through this practice. It doesn't cost me anything and I feel good knowing that my self-care is paying off. During my walks, I listen to past episodes of the Weight Loss Surgery Podcast, which are incredibly helpful and informative to me. Good luck with this exciting next phase for you!

This is very informative, thank you! I am hoping to get the ball rolling before I even meet with the bariatric team so that I'm really in a good space when I begin the process. I have begun incorporating more movement into my days and prioritizing Protein, but I know I have a ways to go before I'm at a point where I'll see weight loss. It sounds like you're in a great place and I'm sure you're going to do great post-op!

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Start small and work up from there. For example, I gave up several items that I've just been known to hand-mouth without realizing how much I'm eating. Like this first month I gave up Cookies, candies, chips, and fast food. I'm getting through it by telling my brain that I don't need it right now; I can have it later. I might never get to later, just like I never got to later when I quit smoking. Next month I add in limiting soft drinks and portion sizes.

You'll do great, just try not to over stress about it.

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1 minute ago, Machalo said:

Start small and work up from there. For example, I gave up several items that I've just been known to hand-mouth without realizing how much I'm eating. Like this first month I gave up Cookies, candies, chips, and fast food. I'm getting through it by telling my brain that I don't need it right now; I can have it later. I might never get to later, just like I never got to later when I quit smoking. Next month I add in limiting soft drinks and portion sizes.

You'll do great, just try not to over stress about it.

This is a really great approach. I tend to be an all or nothing personality type, but I think there's something beneficial in taking things one step at a time. I also like that you don't ban these things... once they're off limits, there's a switch that flips, at least in my mind, that makes me want XYZ way more. By allowing myself these things at a later time, I still have the option and that's important--even if we don't choose to have them in the end.

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I was the worse eater in the world - 52 years of junk, fast food, and beat the hell out of my body. Sugar was a my lifeline. I started with switching to fake healthy sugar then eventually got off it all together. I had the sleeve and it was the best decision i ever made.

You can use my decision - I sat down and decided to choose to life vs eat and drink, Good luck and I hope it works out for you

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Absolutely get rid of the junk now! It will make recovery so much easier. You have to knock the sugar. Period. With bypass, you don't want to risk dumping. It takes about 3 days, but once you are off the sugar, the cravings will settle down - unless you take a single bite again. I was already wheat free, but knocked off the sugar, all soda, all processed foods, and caffeine preop. I was soooo glad I did. No withdrawal from any of that crap when I was already dealing with recovery.

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16 hours ago, AZhiker said:

Absolutely get rid of the junk now! It will make recovery so much easier. You have to knock the sugar. Period. With bypass, you don't want to risk dumping. It takes about 3 days, but once you are off the sugar, the cravings will settle down - unless you take a single bite again. I was already wheat free, but knocked off the sugar, all soda, all processed foods, and caffeine preop. I was soooo glad I did. No withdrawal from any of that crap when I was already dealing with recovery.

Thank you for this! I know getting off the sugar is going to be essential pre-surgery and you're right, it's better to do it now than to deal with it while also recovering.

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17 hours ago, AJ Tylo said:

I was the worse eater in the world - 52 years of junk, fast food, and beat the hell out of my body. Sugar was a my lifeline. I started with switching to fake healthy sugar then eventually got off it all together. I had the sleeve and it was the best decision i ever made.

You can use my decision - I sat down and decided to choose to life vs eat and drink, Good luck and I hope it works out for you

So glad to hear of your success! Thank you for the advice!

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Lauren87-

This is a great post!

I am just like you. Got a lap band about 10 years ago and it worked great--until it didn't. Now I have to get it removed and want to revise to a RNY.

I've developed a touch of diabetes in the last few months and have tried to give up sugar, which will help with both my diabetes and learning not to eat sweets after the bypass. Sometimes I slide a bit, but after the bypass I imagine a bad dumping will change that!

Anyway, good luck with your decision, and visit here often. The peeps are funny, smart, supportive and the best bunch of friends I have NEVER met!

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Hey Mikeyy! What kind of shakes are you drinking? Are you making them yourself?

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