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Slider foods?

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Started by krysten.warren, Jan 12, 2014 6:01 PM
9 replies to this topic
9 replies to this topic

    krysten.warren

    Senior Member

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Posted January 12, 2014 - 6:01 PM

#1
Baked potato a slider for anyone else? Also list some others if you don't mind (:


    kltklass

    Guru in Training

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Posted January 12, 2014 - 6:38 PM

#2

Mac and cheese. I try not to have it very often. I haven't had any baked potato's yet. I did have a bite of a sweet potato with butter and sour cream. That could be hazardous if I had it in the house. I'm 5 months out and I still prefer soft food instead of dense foods.




    shadylady_57

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Posted January 12, 2014 - 7:01 PM

#3

Mac and cheese. I try not to have it very often. I haven't had any baked potato's yet. I did have a bite of a sweet potato with butter and sour cream. That could be hazardous if I had it in the house. I'm 5 months out and I still prefer soft food instead of dense foods.


French fries , potato chips and Salas.


    Carlotta1

    Aspiring Evangelist

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Posted January 12, 2014 - 7:37 PM

#4
I am 5 weeks post op and do better with only soft foods.. Otherwise I throw up my food if it slightly dense. Just taking me more time than others. Measure your portions.. And stick to it. I do well with baked potatoe with light cheese. But I know I can't have more than 1/2 cup.


    Kindle

    Bariatric Master

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Posted January 12, 2014 - 7:51 PM

#5
Read this on another WLS forum....

Slider Foods Spell Weight Regain For Weight Loss Surgery Patients

By Kaye Bailey

For most people eating sliders is a good thing. Popularized by the American food chain, White Castle, a slider (originally slyder) is a miniature grilled hamburger or cheeseburger on a steamed bun often served with onions and dill pickle and other condiments. They originally sold for a nickel a piece in the 1940s making it affordable to add a side of fries for just pennies. By all accounts this is a good kind of "slider" food.

To the weight loss surgery patient slider foods are the bane of good intentions and ignorance often causing dumping syndrome, weight loss plateaus, and eventually weight gain. Slider foods, to weight loss surgery patients, are soft simple processed carbohydrates of little or no nutritional value that slide right through the surgical stomach pouch without providing nutrition or satiation. The most innocent of slider foods are saltine crackers, often eaten with warm tea or other beverages, to soothe the stomach in illness or while recovering from surgery.

The most commonly consumed slider foods include pretzels, crackers (saltines, graham, Ritz, etc.) filled cracker snacks such as Ritz Bits, popcorn, cheese snacks (Cheetos) or cheese crackers, tortilla chips with salsa, potato chips, sugar-free cookies, cakes, and candy. You will notice these slider foods are often salty and cause dry mouth so they must be ingested with liquid to be palatable. This is how they become slider foods. They are also, most often, void of nutritional value.

For weight loss surgery patients the process of digestion is different than those who have not undergone gastric surgery. When slider foods are consumed they go into the stomach pouch and exit directly into the jejunum where the simple carbohydrate slurry is quickly absorbed and stored by the body. There is little thermic effect in the digestion of simple carbohydrates like there is in the digestion of protein so little metabolic energy is expended. In most cases patients in the phase of weight loss who eat slider foods will experience a weight loss plateau and possibly the setback of weight gain. And sadly, they will begin to believe their surgical stomach pouch is not functioning properly because they never feel fullness or restriction like they experience when eating protein.

The very nature of the surgical gastric pouch is to cause feelings of tightness or restriction when one has eaten enough food. However, when soft simple carbohydrates are eaten this tightness or restriction does not result and one can continue to eat, unmeasured, copious amounts of non-nutritional food without ever feeling uncomfortable.

Many patients turn to slider foods for this very reason. They do not like the discomfort that results when the pouch is full from eating a measured portion of lean animal or dairy protein without liquids. Yet it is this very restriction that is the desired result of the surgery. The discomfort is intended to signal the cessation of eating. Remembering the "Protein First" rule is crucial to weight management with bariatric surgery.

Gastric bypass, gastric banding (lap-band) and gastric sleeve patients are instructed to follow a high protein diet to facilitate healing and promote weight loss. Bariatric centers advise what is commonly known among weight loss surgery patients as the "Four Rules" the most important of which is "Protein First." That means of all nutrients (protein, carbohydrates, fat and alcohol) the patient is required to eat protein first.

Protein is not always the most comfortable food choice for weight loss surgery patients who feel restriction after eating a very small amount of food. However, for the surgical tool to work correctly a diet rich in protein and low in simple carbohydrate slider foods must be observed. The high protein diet must be followed even after healthy body weight has been achieved in order to maintain a healthy weight and avoid weight regain.

Kaye Bailey 2010 - All Rights Reserved


    longtimecoming7

    Junior Guru

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Posted January 12, 2014 - 10:56 PM

#6
That was interesting! Thanks for sharing it!


    Katcloudshepherd

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Posted January 13, 2014 - 8:32 AM

#7
Thank you so much for sharing that article. It answered all the questions I had about "slider" foods. I'll guess I'll have to put them on the list of "things I just cannot have again". I'm an all or nothing type of person who KNOWS--like an alcoholic cannot have a sip of alcohol ever again---I CANNOT have just a tiny bite of some foods. Oh well. Life is good. I'm enjoying being able to move with less pain--so I can forgo certain things in order to be able to move with less pain.

Edited by Katcloudshepherd, January 13, 2014 - 8:33 AM.



    shadylady_57

    Expert Member

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Posted January 14, 2014 - 1:45 PM

#8

Thank you so much for sharing that article. It answered all the questions I had about "slider" foods. I'll guess I'll have to put them on the list of "things I just cannot have again". I'm an all or nothing type of person who KNOWS--like an alcoholic cannot have a sip of alcohol ever again---I CANNOT have just a tiny bite of some foods. Oh well. Life is good. I'm enjoying being able to move with less pain--so I can forgo certain things in order to be able to move with less pain.


Thanks for the information on slider foods. My surgeon never required me going for nutrtion classes before surgery. I guess it was becaused I live 80 miles from them.


    clk

    So Long Gone

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Posted January 14, 2014 - 9:05 PM

#9

Very sound advice on avoiding sliders.  They are a huge cause of regain because they're usually not nutritionally sound foods in the first place.  Add in the ability to eat much larger quantities because they slide and you've got a bad combination that usually spells regain.  Double ouch if the food in question is a trigger food that starts that cycle of craving and overindulging.  Those are things we have to consciously avoid, because our surgery doesn't fix those type of food issues for us.

 

But really, I'm amazed at these sleeves of steel that can slide potatoes and pasta!  I still have trouble with those foods at 3.5 years out.  Just more proof that all sleeves are not created equal.

 

~Cheri


Edited by clk, January 14, 2014 - 9:05 PM.



    Mrs Havelock

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Posted January 14, 2014 - 9:16 PM

#10
Potatoes in any form hit my stomach like a brick. Really very unpleasant!


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