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Keto and the Gastric Bypass w/gall bladder removal



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My question is can I safely do Keto with a bypass and no gall bladder?

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I think for the most part, the diet we follow post-surgery (whether sleeve or bypass) is what is known as protein-prioritized Keto (there's a FB group if you are interested). Keep Protein high, fats low to moderate, and carbs low. In fact, I really don't understand the (traditional keto) focus on high fat since the reason most people lose weight is because of low carbs. And of course protein is better for you than fat. That said, some people may be more sensitive to fatty foods after bypass (I just had a bypass revision myself and this is something I'm concerned about). I would talk to your doctor/nutritionist to see what they think.

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3 minutes ago, biginjapan said:

I think for the most part, the diet we follow post-surgery (whether sleeve or bypass) is what is known as protein-prioritized Keto (there's a FB group if you are interested). Keep Protein high, fats low to moderate, and carbs low. In fact, I really don't understand the (traditional keto) focus on high fat since the reason most people lose weight is because of low carbs. And of course Protein is better for you than fat. That said, some people may be more sensitive to fatty foods after bypass (I just had a bypass revision myself and this is something I'm concerned about). I would talk to your doctor/nutritionist to see what they think.

Have I told you lately that I love you? Seriously sparkleheart you. I couldn't have said this better! :) Gotta go find that group now!

I do low carb-low/mod fat, adequate protein with IF. I've lost 155+ lbs with it, and my gallbladder is kinda "tricky". LOL. So if I DO eat high fat, my body hates me for it. You'll do well in my opinion. :)

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4 minutes ago, FluffyChix said:

Have I told you lately that I love you? Seriously sparkleheart you. I couldn't have said this better! :) Gotta go find that group now!

I do low carb-low/mod fat, adequate Protein with IF. I've lost 155+ lbs with it, and my gallbladder is kinda "tricky". LOL. So if I DO eat high fat, my body hates me for it. You'll do well in my opinion. :)

You know, I did ask my surgeon about my gallbladder and he said it was fine, but it is something that I will have to keep an eye on as the months and years progress. The only truly high fat thing that I enjoy eating is cheese, but we'll have to see how well my body reacts to it.

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13 minutes ago, biginjapan said:

You know, I did ask my surgeon about my gallbladder and he said it was fine, but it is something that I will have to keep an eye on as the months and years progress. The only truly high fat thing that I enjoy eating is cheese, but we'll have to see how well my body reacts to it.

I eat reduced fat cheeses without issue. I have to limit how quantity of full fat cheese or it really get's me. I'm probably only 1 to 1 1/2 oz of full fat cheese at a meal for me and no other fat source lol.

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@FluffyChix Unfortunately here in Japan low-fat cheeses are very hard to find. At the moment I have a bunch of cheeses in my fridge but I think if I just use a little in different recipes, then I might be okay.

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30 minutes ago, biginjapan said:

I think for the most part, the diet we follow post-surgery (whether sleeve or bypass) is what is known as protein-prioritized Keto (there's a FB group if you are interested). Keep Protein high, fats low to moderate, and carbs low. In fact, I really don't understand the (traditional keto) focus on high fat since the reason most people lose weight is because of low carbs. And of course Protein is better for you than fat. That said, some people may be more sensitive to fatty foods after bypass (I just had a bypass revision myself and this is something I'm concerned about). I would talk to your doctor/nutritionist to see what they think.

Thanks for your reply and I would love to know the FB group name! My stomach does protest too much fat! My 6 month appointment was delayed a month since I have cold/flu symptoms. Boo!

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PM me for our group info...

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3 minutes ago, Lynda486 said:

Thanks for your reply and I would love to know the FB group name! My stomach does protest too much fat! My 6 month appointment was delayed a month since I have cold/flu symptoms. Boo!

Protein Prioritized Dirty Keto

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Posted (edited)

3 hours ago, biginjapan said:

I think for the most part, the diet we follow post-surgery (whether sleeve or bypass) is what is known as protein-prioritized Keto (there's a FB group if you are interested). Keep Protein high, fats low to moderate, and carbs low. In fact, I really don't understand the (traditional keto) focus on high fat since the reason most people lose weight is because of low carbs. And of course Protein is better for you than fat. That said, some people may be more sensitive to fatty foods after bypass (I just had a bypass revision myself and this is something I'm concerned about). I would talk to your doctor/nutritionist to see what they think.

This is a thruth with modification. Because we need some fats in our diets, especially the essiencial fatty acids. While our bypasses are malnurishing, they are not equally malnurishing as 20 years ago, but we still need a little fat to make sure that we are using the nutriens in the food we eat. Some Vitamins need fat to be absorbed properly. In a regular body were all is intact 10 grams of fat for each meal is a good goal. That beeing said, protein is the onlly macro that we actually need, and it has a higher termic effect than carbs and fat.

Traditional Keto is a waste of time. For normal people weight loss is gained by good macros and calorie deficit. For us it is the same way, only we need to eat by some guidelines to make sure we get enough nutriens. I personally am a big fan of pound of cure simplicity. Just eat veggies and side portion of protein.

Also, if one has had the gall bladder removed, one does no longer have that filter for all the fat, so one could end up with fatty diarea if one eats to much fat.

Edited by MsMocie

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Good points MsMocie! I like the thought of veggies with a side of protein! I love my veggies, in fact I started some seeds today!

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7 hours ago, MsMocie said:

This is a thruth with modification. Because we need some fats in our diets, especially the essiencial fatty acids. While our bypasses are malnurishing, they are not equally malnurishing as 20 years ago, but we still need a little fat to make sure that we are using the nutriens in the food we eat. Some Vitamins need fat to be absorbed properly. In a regular body were all is intact 10 grams of fat for each meal is a good goal. That beeing said, Protein is the onlly macro that we actually need, and it has a higher termic effect than carbs and fat.

Traditional Keto is a waste of time. For normal people weight loss is gained by good macros and calorie deficit. For us it is the same way, only we need to eat by some guidelines to make sure we get enough nutriens. I personally am a big fan of pound of cure simplicity. Just eat veggies and side portion of protein.

Also, if one has had the gall bladder removed, one does no longer have that filter for all the fat, so one could end up with fatty diarea if one eats to much fat.

Well said. When I had my first surgery and was finally eating regular foods I focused on carbs and protein and let the fat macros fall where they lay (probably around 40-50g per day, but I did eat a lot of cheese ;-)). The other day I was going through all the books I had related to eating, weight loss, Keto, and bariatric surgery and came across the Pound of Cure book by Dr. Weiner (who has great videos on YouTube as well). I know I read some of it, but I'll definitely have to reread it for when I'm past all the post-op stages and into eating regular meals. The problem for me in Japan is that there is a very limited variety of vegetables here, many of which are hard for me to eat due to some gastrointestinal issues I have unrelated to my gastric surgeries, and anything not local tends to be very pricey, so it limits my options. Honestly, when I go to other countries (US, Canada, Europe), I feel like crying when I go to the supermarket and see all the amazing fruits and vegetables available that I just can't get in Japan, or in a limited way because they are so expensive ($3 a peach anyone? $2 for 3 spears of asparagus? $5 for 1/3pint of blueberries?). However, I'm sure I'll be able to figure something out.

Note: for everyone who thinks Japanese food is healthy, most of it is carbs+protein, with very few vegetables. If you think of a bento box, half the box is rice, the other 40% tends to be meat or fish, and the remaining 10% is vegetables, usually pickled. A traditional Breakfast may have miso Soup with tofu (healthy, lots of protein), rice, and fish. Or rice porridge. Many people just eat toast, or maybe eggs. lunch and/or dinner might be something like curry rice, or fried chicken and rice, or ramen, or whatever. Few to no veggies. When I ask my students how many vegetables they eat per day, the vast majority of them don't eat any, although to be fair, they are university students (this is usually part of a larger discussion of what it means to be healthy - just because people are thin, doesn't mean they are healthy, and vice versa). People doing keto, or who are vegetarian (or worse, vegan, since so many things are made with fish stock) really struggle when travelling here to find enough healthy foods for them to eat.

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Wow, and all these years I thought in Japan they ate healthy! I wonder why the lack of fruit and vegetables there, climate? I have heard of DR Weiner and will have to look for his book.

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3 hours ago, Lynda486 said:

Wow, and all these years I thought in Japan they ate healthy! I wonder why the lack of fruit and vegetables there, climate? I have heard of DR Weiner and will have to look for his book.

They do and they don't. If there is a woman at home (mother, grandmother) then they usually prepare healthy meals. But many people who live alone (like students and young workers), or salarymen on a busy day, will stick to fast foods like ramen, which is so full of calories and fat one bowl of it will almost make up your entire daily calorie limit! The bentos at my university (all universities are the same) are geared to be cheap, so every single one of them has some kind of fried food (chicken or pork usually) in addition to at least a cup (or more) of rice. If you want something other than that the little cafe has curry rice. The department store next door doesn't have any healthier options, it's all noodles or rice-based dishes.

Japan is a mountainous country, only 11% of it is arable land, and many people live on that. There are fruits that are grown here - apples, peaches, grapes (muscat - the kind used for wine, for some reason), and watermelon are the most common, but they are so babied (each piece of fruit has a little bag hand-tied around it to protect it from birds and the weather) which makes them quite expensive. If the fruit is not perfect, it doesn't go to market. I've seen watermelon fields where about a third of the crop was left to rot in the sun, especially after the crows got to them. Students at my university (and some teachers!) would sneak into the fields at night and go grab perfectly fine watermelon for a snack. The reason they were left to rot? Either because they were not perfectly round, or they had a patch of yellow on them (in Japan they should be 100% green). The further south you go the more citrus fruits are found. Vegetables tend to be a lot of starchy root vegetables which take a long time to prepare and/or may be quite slimy, other veggies like Chinese eggplant, tomatoes, and pieman (a kind of green pepper that most children hate) and leafy vegetables like lettuces, spinach and cabbage. OMG, they love cabbage here! I can't eat it, which makes it almost impossible to eat pre-made salads here since about 98% of them are mostly cabbage. Also everything is grown really big - big apples, big peaches, big carrots - they look good, but the taste is meh. The apples and carrots are not that sweet. Tomatoes look good, but can be mealy and tasteless.

I think the reason many Japanese are so thin is a good part genetics (fast metabolism) and the fact that they eat smaller meals than what is available in most Western countries. For example, large drink here is the equivalent of a small back home. Sweets are not that sweet - when I first came here I didn't like them because I couldn't "taste" anything, but after being off sugar for almost a year I found that they were much more palatable than Western sweets which were too sweet. Also, they walk or bike a lot. In fact, they move more than almost any other people on the planet so that helps too.

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