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Super Size Me/Documentary



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Do you eat fast food often? I'll bet you cut back on how much fast food you let your kids have after watching this. It is a documentary, please watch it. It's worth the time to view it.

Definitely worth the time to view. I'm happy to say that the schools around Las Vegas have finally removed the McDonald's, pizza Huts and Vending Machines from the school cafeteria. It's sad the number of obese children there are in the US. As a child, I wasn't heavy - that was because I was always outside riding bikes, skating, playing baseball, etc. There were no computers or video games and we only had 1 TV in our house and my dad controlled that.

I can't stomach fast food ... gave it up years ago ... occassionally I'll have a "craving" for a Wendy's burger or Arby's and I'll give in ... huge mistake. Don't know if it's all the fat or what, but let's just say, generally within an hour of eating it, it's left my body. Then I remember THAT's why I don't eat the "fast" stuff.

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Definitely worth the time to view. I'm happy to say that the schools around Las Vegas have finally removed the McDonald's, pizza Huts and Vending Machines from the school cafeteria. It's sad the number of obese children there are in the US. As a child, I wasn't heavy - that was because I was always outside riding bikes, skating, playing baseball, etc. There were no computers or video games and we only had 1 TV in our house and my dad controlled that.

I can't stomach fast food ... gave it up years ago ... occassionally I'll have a "craving" for a Wendy's burger or Arby's and I'll give in ... huge mistake. Don't know if it's all the fat or what, but let's just say, generally within an hour of eating it, it's left my body. Then I remember THAT's why I don't eat the "fast" stuff.

I don't know what schools are thinking when they put that crap in schools anyway. It shouldn't have to be removed, it shouldn't have been there to begin with.

I agree, when I was a kid we were outside playing hard every single day after school, on weekends we came home for meals and sleep. ;o) Otherwise it was as you write, riding our bikes, playing games, running, playing. Kids were not fat then, today a ton of them are fat.

I was reading a study the other day where they were looking at the income of families with obese kids vs. healthy BMI kids. The poorer the family the fatter the kids. I don't get this, it does not have to cost a lot to feed healthy, low fat foods to kids.

There is a product I use (S/F Hawaiian Punch Lemon berry Flavor Yummm) that I can only find at Dollar Tree stores. I was there recently and I was looking at all the garbage they sell. Mega cans of Pasta and Tomato sauce loaded with refined carbs, fat, sugar, and low nutrition. A mega can is $1.00. I know people are buying this stuff but I can make a really hearty, vegetable/Lentil Soup loaded with fresh veggies that will cost the same per serving as a can of the horrible stuff.

Beans and lentils, dirt cheap, makes a ton of food, cheaper than the Dollar store Entrees.

When you feed a child (or adult) high carb, processed foods their blood sugar goes up. Then their body stores fat much more easily and what do you have? A fat kid.

Anyway, I fully agree with you.

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IKids were not fat then,

I was! :laugh0:

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I was a fat kid and teenager and... Knowing how awful kids can be to one another, I can't understand a parent putting crap into their kids' bodies. I buy things on sale and take advantage of the sales by buying in bulk. This week, I got buy one, get one free chicken cutlets. I spend a few hours preparing them, portioning them out, and then freezing them. When I don't feel like cooking, I take a pack out and dinner is a breeze.

I can honestly say I have not been to a fast food restaurant like McDonalds in well over 8 years and I don't miss it. I don't eat beef, pork, or lamb so not much on their menu interests me anyway.

Maybe this economy will force more people to eat home. Cooking with a kid is something they love and it's an excellent way to teach them about reading food labels and instilling good nutrition habits.

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Knowing how awful kids can be to one another, I can't understand a parent putting crap into their kids' bodies.

When I was growing up, there was no McDonalds at first. When one opened up, it was a really big deal to go to it. We did it maybe 3x a year. My mom always cooked. I don't think the food she made us would meet today's standards of healthy, but it was considered healthy at the time. (And who knows what will be said about today's diets when our kids are adults with kids of their own.) We rarely had soda and other junk. We didn't have dessert with every meal every night.

My parents did everything they could think of to control my weight as well. None of it worked.

The thing is, looking back, I wasn't *that* fat and I'm pretty sure, if they'd just left me alone, I'd have gotten through puberty and slimmed out. Instead, they nagged me to death and I went on my first diet when I was 13 ... it started my trend of yo-yo dieting and I'm also the shortest one in my family. I have to wonder if dieting when I was growing didn't have an impact on both these things.

I know our modern lifestyles have made the problem of obesity worse, but that's not the entire story. I also think it's convenient to blame the parents when kids are overweight (or do anything we object to, really, that kids do) and it's not always that simple.

Think about your own childhood -- did your parents try to control your food to "help" with your weight problem and did it work? I'm guesing "Yes" and "no". :001_tongue:

You can't force another person to eat or not eat. You can control the food you give them, but, unless you control their entire environment, there are limits to your control even over that.

It's just a very complex problem and it's largely biological in nature.

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It's just a very complex problem and it's largely biological in nature.

Here we disagree on this issue again. I don't agree that it is largely biological in nature. I think it is a combination of physiology, environment, genetics, and emotional.

You say that had your parents left you alone and not pestered you about your weight growing up you probably would have slimmed down upon reaching puberty. How is that biological? Sounds environmental and emotional to me.

Do you know that in many cases if you treat a person's head hunger with OCD meds it kills their head hunger. Makes you wanna go hmmmm. ;o)

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You say that had your parents left you alone and not pestered you about your weight growing up you probably would have slimmed down upon reaching puberty. How is that biological?

No, it's completely biological. I chunked up because I was going through puberty and my body wanted extra stores in case there was a famine. That's very reasonable of my body. Once puberty was over, the stores would not be needed and would go away.

Instead, I went on a diet. Now my body experienced that famine it was worried about and decided I need to not only put all that weight back on, but add in an extra 10 lb. just in case. If the famine (diet) hadn't happened, then there would have been no biological need.

I spent over a decade involved in figure skating and I got to see about 700 little girls grow up in that time. Many of them got chunky during puberty, even though they were training 10-20 hours a week. But then they'd show up at the rink around age 16 or 17 and they'd be 5 inches taller and all slimmed down .... unless their parent fussed about their weight and they ended up dieting. Then they'd struggle with weight the rest of the time they'd remain in the sport.

A lot of the judges and officials were also skaters as kids and during a time when weight was more strictly controlled. Their years of struggling with weight limits and diets caused them to be obese adults with very slow metabolisms.

IMO, dieting is not for kids!

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IMO, dieting is not for kids!

When my oldest son (first child) was a baby -- he went through a phase where all he would eat was applesauce. I was concerned, so I took him to the pediatrician. He told me not to worry about it - when he was hungry he would eat. He said that if everyone ate like young children did, there would be no overweight people -- that overeating was a "learned" behavior. I believe he is partly right ... dieting should never have been invented, IMO

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So many women don't cook family meals now. I worked, but we ate family dinner at home at least six days a week. Now they make a big deal about family home dinners and give high fives if they do it once a week. So where are the families? At the fast food joint. You can make good dinners that don't take a long time or a lot of money. You have to be a careful shopper. Fast food is not that cheap when you are going with a family.

I know what you mean about leaving in the morning and only turning up for meals. We were out biking, skating, jumping rope, etc.

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No, it's completely biological. I chunked up because I was going through puberty and my body wanted extra stores in case there was a famine. That's very reasonable of my body. Once puberty was over, the stores would not be needed and would go away.

Instead, I went on a diet. Now my body experienced that famine it was worried about and decided I need to not only put all that weight back on, but add in an extra 10 lb. just in case. If the famine (diet) hadn't happened, then there would have been no biological need.

I spent over a decade involved in figure skating and I got to see about 700 little girls grow up in that time. Many of them got chunky during puberty, even though they were training 10-20 hours a week. But then they'd show up at the rink around age 16 or 17 and they'd be 5 inches taller and all slimmed down .... unless their parent fussed about their weight and they ended up dieting. Then they'd struggle with weight the rest of the time they'd remain in the sport.

A lot of the judges and officials were also skaters as kids and during a time when weight was more strictly controlled. Their years of struggling with weight limits and diets caused them to be obese adults with very slow metabolisms.

IMO, dieting is not for kids!

I have to tell you Mac, you know I adore you and respect the heck out of you. I think you are beyond trippy. I also think you are in denial. ;o) I was too for a very long time.

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I have to tell you Mac, you know I adore you and respect the heck out of you. I think you are beyond trippy. I also think you are in denial. ;o) I was too for a very long time.

I think the two of you are GREAT debaters and that Alex should make a new section entitled "DEBATE - Mac & WASa" and the members pick a topic for the two of you to debate on ... between the two of you, everyone definitely gets all sides of the topic.

BTW - not being facetious (sp?) or trying to be a smart ass -- being totally serious ... I enjoy reading what both of you have to say and have learned so much I can't believe it.

Alex - what do you think?

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I think the two of you are GREAT debaters and that Alex should make a new section entitled "DEBATE - Mac & WASa" and the members pick a topic for the two of you to debate on ... between the two of you, everyone definitely gets all sides of the topic.

BTW - not being facetious (sp?) or trying to be a smart ass -- being totally serious ... I enjoy reading what both of you have to say and have learned so much I can't believe it.

Alex - what do you think?

Mac and I usually agree on most topics in the end. It's the little details getting to the final issue we disagree on. But I like Mac because it never becomes heated. We can agree to disagree and in the end we agree. Hard to explain! HA

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Dieting would not be necessary IF nutrition was taught early on in schools. Many parents have no idea how to read a food label. They might truly believe what they are serving is healthy when, in reality, it's crap. Have you ever read the ingredients listed in a container of cool whip... disgusting.

Like it or not, childhood obesity is becoming an epidemic in this country and the present generation is not expected to live as long as their parents. How sad is that? In the hospital, we see pre-teens coming in with complications of diabetes, breathing problems and yes, chest pain! Call it whatever you want but kids DO need to be put on diets if their weight is out of control.

About all a lot of kds are exercising today are their hands and finger... computer, texting, and reaching for chips.< /span>

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When I was a child, we were taught nutrition in school.

We were taught a lot of useful things too. How to behave on an interview and how to write a resume. Manners.

A lot of kids have no clue because they don't come from homes where it is taught.

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