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Because they tend to have less calories and problematic types of fats. I'd double check with a doctor on fat content in maintenance.

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If you have RNY gastric bypass surgery, then the part of the stomach that normally processes fats and sugars has been cut off. Therefore if you consume fats and sugars it can lead to dumping syndrome. After about a year, your intestines will figure out something is wrong and adppt this function. Therefore for Gastric Bypass patients, this restriction will go away. So generally when you reach the maintenance phase, fats are reintroduced back into the diet because fats are important in hunger control. So in the maintenance phase, my nutritionist recommended a diet with equal levels of fats, carbs and Protein. But protein always comes first.

If you had sleeve surgery, I am not sure of this requirement.

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On 10/11/2018 at 09:37, James Marusek said:



If you have RNY gastric bypass surgery, then the part of the stomach that normally processes fats and sugars has been cut off. Therefore if you consume fats and sugars it can lead to dumping syndrome. After about a year, your intestines will figure out something is wrong and adppt this function. Therefore for Gastric Bypass patients, this restriction will go away. So generally when you reach the maintenance phase, fats are reintroduced back into the diet because fats are important in hunger control. So in the maintenance phase, my nutritionist recommended a diet with equal levels of fats, carbs and Protein. But Protein always comes first.




If you had sleeve surgery, I am not sure of this requirement.


I actually don’t think this is true. The part of the stomach bypassed is not “the part that processes fats and sugars”. And gastric bypass patients don’t “lose” restriction, but the body does adapt to the malabsorption initially caused by the surgery.

The low fat requirement is, as someone else stated, because these foods generally have more calories in them. This surgery is about developing healthy habits long term, and abiding by a low fat, low calorie, high protein diet is part of that.

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I avoid low fat anything...just nasty. I do try to eat only healthy fats as much as possible although I do use real butter in recipes but since I consume such small amounts I do not think it is an issue. I did adhere to my programs' recommendations for low fat for the first few months. Have never tried anything fried or greasy though.

Fat is an important nutrient and also provides satiety in the diet.

Edited by MIZ60

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Dumping syndrome is a condition that can develop after surgery to remove all or part of your stomach or after surgery to bypass your stomach to help you lose weight. The condition can also develop in people who have had esophageal surgery. Also called rapid gastric emptying, dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, moves from your stomach into your small bowel too quickly.

Signs and symptoms of dumping syndrome generally occur right after eating, especially after a meal rich in table sugar (sucrose) or fruit sugar (fructose). Signs and symptoms might include:

Feeling bloated or too full after eating

Nausea

Vomiting

Abdominal cramps

Diarrhea

Flushing

Dizziness, lightheadedness

Rapid heart rate

Source: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dumping-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20371915

So the ability of sugar to cause dumping syndrome in gastric bypass patients is correct but not necessarily fats.

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