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With the rapid hormonal changes…. Its has increased moodiness and just sometimes my emotions being everywhere. Everything is changing so fast and with my body trying to catch up, im feeling it psychologically. I know itll get better in time. Just was hoping i wasnt alone in this.. transition

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Estrogen is stored in your fat. As you lose weight it is released into your blood stream. This additional estrogen or estrogen flush causes your emotions to go haywire (like major PMT) & changes to your menstrual cycle (heavier/lighter, more or less frequent periods).

Plus in general, this is a pretty emotional & stressful time. The surgery, the reduced eating, the structured eating, etc. all can mess with your emotions too.

It does settle eventually though when differs person to person.

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You are definitely not alone. @Arabesque pretty much covered the how and why, but it is definitely a crazy, emotional ride for a lot of us. It does get better though, for me it was a little better each day and didn’t last too long. Just remember to be kind to yourself. You are doing great!!

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Posted (edited)

I never really had the emotional ups and downs, mostly because at the time I had PCOS, and the influx of estrogen from both my surgeries actually normalized my hormones for a few months each time lol What I DID have, however, is the emotional issues that came with changing my relationship with food. I had NO IDEA that would be a thing lol

Changing what you eat, how you eat, when and why you eat, how often you eat is like breaking up with a toxic partner. You've been together for a REALLY long time, and even though you KNOW it's a terrible, unhealthy relationship, it's really all you know and you're so dependent on it you don't think you can function without it. And now you have to figure out how to.

You have to completely retrain your brain, learn the difference between true hunger and head hunger (there is an actual, real difference), and you have to learn to read the nutrition labels, track your calories and Protein and carbs, work out, don't cheat (and don't make excuse after excuse and justification after justification for why you went back to the toxic relationship even after you knew it was bad for you, yet still gave in), measure food, track fluids, take HONEST accountability for your actions (which isn't something most of us had been particularly good at) and make adjustments as needed to stay as compliant as possible for the long haul.

Contrary to what so many think, there's actually a LOT of work that has to happen after the surgery. The surgery itself is just a tool. It's not a miracle cure. It won't fix all the issues if you don't put in the actual work. Just eating smaller amounts without making any of the necessary changes isn't enough, and that's a hard lesson many learn later on. All of this is such a mind eff, and takes a toll on a person. It's a lot of changes, and a lot of work, thrown at a person all at once. And no matter how ready you think you are, it can still cause so much emotional turmoil, and understandably so.

What I, and so many, don't realize is that we all have ED (eating disorders) in order to get to being obese and morbidly obese (or in some cases, super morbidly obese). It's not just anorexia or bulimia. I genuinely didn't know that. We have to retrain our brains to get out of that, and sometimes that requires help, and we have to be ok with getting that help. And because we have to do that, we then get incredibly frustrated and defeated feeling when the weight comes off slower than we thought it would, or we hit stalls (or in my case, stall after stall after stall - which is COMPLETELY normal, by the way, and should be expected).

I said all of this to say there's SO many different reasons we can have emotions all over the place. Influx of hormones all at once, changes in relationship with food, changes in routines and increase in the things we don't particularly like doing (or not doing anymore), learning we have to do a lot of work to get and maintain the results we want after the surgery, learning PATIENCE with the rate of weight loss and trusting the process (easier said than done, believe me, I know), realizing that body dysmorphia is REAL and we can and do struggle with seeing ourselves as anything other than our formerly obese selves (I'm 182 pounds and I still see 421 pounds sometimes when I look in the mirror), and of course, Hair loss (also COMPLETELY normal, and will eventually stop). You won't go bald, there's nothing to prevent it or stop it, you need to increase your Protein, Biotin doesn't slow it down, and it's a COMPLETELY normal part of the process that many of us don't know about until it happens and then we freak out.

So give yourself some grace and just know this is normal. You're doing great, and we're all here for you, just like everyone was here for me :)

Edited by SleeveToBypass2023

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On 07/08/2024 at 00:14, Arabesque said:



Estrogen is stored in your fat. As you lose weight it is released into your blood stream. This additional estrogen or estrogen flush causes your emotions to go haywire (like major PMT) & changes to your menstrual cycle (heavier/lighter, more or less frequent periods).




Plus in general, this is a pretty emotional & stressful time. The surgery, the reduced eating, the structured eating, etc. all can mess with your emotions too.



It does settle eventually though when differs person to person.


This was very reassuring & explains alot. Thank you thank you thank you🥹

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Goodness yes. I am incredibly emotionally reactive right now -- and prior to all this, as an adult I've always been very non-reactive, to the extent that I used to wonder if I was a sociopath. The past two-ish-weeks I've been on a rage bender, and now I'm starting to see that ease but now instead I get teary when I tell my dog I love her, etc. XD

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On 07/08/2024 at 04:59, SleeveToBypass2023 said:



I never really had the emotional ups and downs, mostly because at the time I had PCOS, and the influx of estrogen from both my surgeries actually normalized my hormones for a few months each time lol What I DID have, however, is the emotional issues that came with changing my relationship with food. I had NO IDEA that would be a thing lol




Changing what you eat, how you eat, when and why you eat, how often you eat is like breaking up with a toxic partner. You've been together for a REALLY long time, and even though you KNOW it's a terrible, unhealthy relationship, it's really all you know and you're so dependent on it you don't think you can function without it. And now you have to figure out how to.




You have to completely retrain your brain, learn the difference between true hunger and head hunger (there is an actual, real difference), and you have to learn to read the nutrition labels, track your calories and Protein and carbs, work out, don't cheat (and don't make excuse after excuse and justification after justification for why you went back to the toxic relationship even after you knew it was bad for you, yet still gave in), measure food, track fluids, take HONEST accountability for your actions (which isn't something most of us had been particularly good at) and make adjustments as needed to stay as compliant as possible for the long haul.




Contrary to what so many think, there's actually a LOT of work that has to happen after the surgery. The surgery itself is just a tool. It's not a miracle cure. It won't fix all the issues if you don't put in the actual work. Just eating smaller amounts without making any of the necessary changes isn't enough, and that's a hard lesson many learn later on. All of this is such a mind eff, and takes a toll on a person. It's a lot of changes, and a lot of work, thrown at a person all at once. And no matter how ready you think you are, it can still cause so much emotional turmoil, and understandably so.




What I, and so many, don't realize is that we all have ED (eating disorders) in order to get to being obese and morbidly obese (or in some cases, super morbidly obese). It's not just anorexia or bulimia. I genuinely didn't know that. We have to retrain our brains to get out of that, and sometimes that requires help, and we have to be ok with getting that help. And because we have to do that, we then get incredibly frustrated and defeated feeling when the weight comes off slower than we thought it would, or we hit stalls (or in my case, stall after stall after stall - which is COMPLETELY normal, by the way, and should be expected).




I said all of this to say there's SO many different reasons we can have emotions all over the place. Influx of hormones all at once, changes in relationship with food, changes in routines and increase in the things we don't particularly like doing (or not doing anymore), learning we have to do a lot of work to get and maintain the results we want after the surgery, learning PATIENCE with the rate of weight loss and trusting the process (easier said than done, believe me, I know), realizing that body dysmorphia is REAL and we can and do struggle with seeing ourselves as anything other than our formerly obese selves (I'm 182 pounds and I still see 421 pounds sometimes when I look in the mirror), and of course, Hair loss (also COMPLETELY normal, and will eventually stop). You won't go bald, there's nothing to prevent it or stop it, you need to increase your Protein, Biotin doesn't slow it down, and it's a COMPLETELY normal part of the process that many of us don't know about until it happens and then we freak out.




So give yourself some grace and just know this is normal. You're doing great, and we're all here for you, just like everyone was here for me :)


I realized that i used food to cope with alot and now that i cant im forced to deal with stuff that i otherwise wouldnt. This truly is a new journey for me. Im just grateful for this group.

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On 07/08/2024 at 04:59, SleeveToBypass2023 said:



I never really had the emotional ups and downs, mostly because at the time I had PCOS, and the influx of estrogen from both my surgeries actually normalized my hormones for a few months each time lol What I DID have, however, is the emotional issues that came with changing my relationship with food. I had NO IDEA that would be a thing lol




Changing what you eat, how you eat, when and why you eat, how often you eat is like breaking up with a toxic partner. You've been together for a REALLY long time, and even though you KNOW it's a terrible, unhealthy relationship, it's really all you know and you're so dependent on it you don't think you can function without it. And now you have to figure out how to.




You have to completely retrain your brain, learn the difference between true hunger and head hunger (there is an actual, real difference), and you have to learn to read the nutrition labels, track your calories and Protein and carbs, work out, don't cheat (and don't make excuse after excuse and justification after justification for why you went back to the toxic relationship even after you knew it was bad for you, yet still gave in), measure food, track fluids, take HONEST accountability for your actions (which isn't something most of us had been particularly good at) and make adjustments as needed to stay as compliant as possible for the long haul.




Contrary to what so many think, there's actually a LOT of work that has to happen after the surgery. The surgery itself is just a tool. It's not a miracle cure. It won't fix all the issues if you don't put in the actual work. Just eating smaller amounts without making any of the necessary changes isn't enough, and that's a hard lesson many learn later on. All of this is such a mind eff, and takes a toll on a person. It's a lot of changes, and a lot of work, thrown at a person all at once. And no matter how ready you think you are, it can still cause so much emotional turmoil, and understandably so.




What I, and so many, don't realize is that we all have ED (eating disorders) in order to get to being obese and morbidly obese (or in some cases, super morbidly obese). It's not just anorexia or bulimia. I genuinely didn't know that. We have to retrain our brains to get out of that, and sometimes that requires help, and we have to be ok with getting that help. And because we have to do that, we then get incredibly frustrated and defeated feeling when the weight comes off slower than we thought it would, or we hit stalls (or in my case, stall after stall after stall - which is COMPLETELY normal, by the way, and should be expected).




I said all of this to say there's SO many different reasons we can have emotions all over the place. Influx of hormones all at once, changes in relationship with food, changes in routines and increase in the things we don't particularly like doing (or not doing anymore), learning we have to do a lot of work to get and maintain the results we want after the surgery, learning PATIENCE with the rate of weight loss and trusting the process (easier said than done, believe me, I know), realizing that body dysmorphia is REAL and we can and do struggle with seeing ourselves as anything other than our formerly obese selves (I'm 182 pounds and I still see 421 pounds sometimes when I look in the mirror), and of course, Hair loss (also COMPLETELY normal, and will eventually stop). You won't go bald, there's nothing to prevent it or stop it, you need to increase your Protein, Biotin doesn't slow it down, and it's a COMPLETELY normal part of the process that many of us don't know about until it happens and then we freak out.




So give yourself some grace and just know this is normal. You're doing great, and we're all here for you, just like everyone was here for me :)


I realized that i used food to cope with alot and now that i cant im forced to deal with stuff that i otherwise wouldnt. This truly is a new journey for me. Im just grateful for this group.

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On 07/08/2024 at 12:31, JennyBeez said:



Goodness yes. I am incredibly emotionally reactive right now -- and prior to all this, as an adult I've always been very non-reactive, to the extent that I used to wonder if I was a sociopath. The past two-ish-weeks I've been on a rage bender, and now I'm starting to see that ease but now instead I get teary when I tell my dog I love her, etc. XD


Lol this made me smile. Im literally an outgoing person but lately
Ive been quiet and to myself …. (Not fully seeing my weight loss like everyone else does is added to my sadness). Im trying to be patient

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2 hours ago, JennyBeez said:

Goodness yes. I am incredibly emotionally reactive right now -- and prior to all this, as an adult I've always been very non-reactive, to the extent that I used to wonder if I was a sociopath. The past two-ish-weeks I've been on a rage bender, and now I'm starting to see that ease but now instead I get teary when I tell my dog I love her, etc. XD

Is this the same if you’re on HRT I wonder? Pre-HRT I would have quite happily stabbed hubby just for breathing too loudly and I honestly thought I was going mad - anger, tears, emotions all over the place. Really weird when I’ve generally been relatively sane previously! HRT has calmed all that down but I’d be interested in hearing from menopausal weight-droppers 🤔

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7 hours ago, MrsFitz said:

Is this the same if you’re on HRT I wonder? Pre-HRT I would have quite happily stabbed hubby just for breathing too loudly and I honestly thought I was going mad - anger, tears, emotions all over the place. Really weird when I’ve generally been relatively sane previously! HRT has calmed all that down but I’d be interested in hearing from menopausal weight-droppers 🤔

I was on HRT but still had some breakthrough menopausal symptoms before surgery. After surgery, the hormonal flush got rid of all of them to the point I was considering dropping the HRT or at least reducing to a lower dose. But once I lost the bulk of my weight the breakthrough symptoms came back … strongly. Actually I had to go up to a higher dose.

PS. I developed some absorption issues after my gall was removed two years after my sleeve surgery. One thing that was affected was the absorption of my oral HRT. My GP prescribed a patch instead and everything settled again. Something to keep in mind if you have a bypass or any issues with absorption.

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9 hours ago, Arabesque said:

I was on HRT but still had some breakthrough menopausal symptoms before surgery. After surgery, the hormonal flush got rid of all of them to the point I was considering dropping the HRT or at least reducing to a lower dose. But once I lost the bulk of my weight the breakthrough symptoms came back … strongly. Actually I had to go up to a higher dose.

PS. I developed some absorption issues after my gall was removed two years after my sleeve surgery. One thing that was affected was the absorption of my oral HRT. My GP prescribed a patch instead and everything settled again. Something to keep in mind if you have a bypass or any issues with absorption.

I'm on the patch after my hysterectomy and it's been the greatest thing. My doctor said because of my bypass she would absolutely never recommend anyone do oral HRT. I would have done it because that thought honestly never even occurred to me!!! Glad she was thinking for me lol

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14 hours ago, SleeveToBypass2023 said:

I'm on the patch after my hysterectomy and it's been the greatest thing. My doctor said because of my bypass she would absolutely never recommend anyone do oral HRT. I would have done it because that thought honestly never even occurred to me!!! Glad she was thinking for me lol

Nothing like completely avoiding the digestive tract. I love the convenience of only having to change the patch twice a week. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to get my script filled - supply dramas sigh! My GP swapped me to a gel & a progesterone pill for two months hoping the patch would be available by then & also hoping I’d absorb enough progesterone to cover me for the short term. They’re hoping end of August for the patch to be back which means I’ll need four months of the gel & tablet.

Unexpected effect of being smaller was I was told to rub the gel into my upper arm. Tried that but I’d had to rub it over my entire arm because of the amount of gel & it still wasn’t enough skin. I now rub it all over my butt & tummy. That’s only 1 pump. I’d be rubbing it all over my body if it was two pumps. Lol!

PS I found eucalyptus oil really great at removing the sticky residue left on my skin from the patch.

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Arabesque said:

Nothing like completely avoiding the digestive tract. I love the convenience of only having to change the patch twice a week. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to get my script filled - supply dramas sigh! My GP swapped me to a gel & a progesterone pill for two months hoping the patch would be available by then & also hoping I’d absorb enough progesterone to cover me for the short term. They’re hoping end of August for the patch to be back which means I’ll need four months of the gel & tablet.

Unexpected effect of being smaller was I was told to rub the gel into my upper arm. Tried that but I’d had to rub it over my entire arm because of the amount of gel & it still wasn’t enough skin. I now rub it all over my butt & tummy. That’s only 1 pump. I’d be rubbing it all over my body if it was two pumps. Lol!

PS I found eucalyptus oil really great at removing the sticky residue left on my skin from the patch.

Y’all need to do a thread specific to this particular change for these tips so I can find it when I need them in a few years. Lord knows I won’t remember. Unless you got some tips for that too. 🤣

Edited by ShoppGirl

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8 hours ago, Arabesque said:

Nothing like completely avoiding the digestive tract. I love the convenience of only having to change the patch twice a week. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to get my script filled - supply dramas sigh! My GP swapped me to a gel & a progesterone pill for two months hoping the patch would be available by then & also hoping I’d absorb enough progesterone to cover me for the short term. They’re hoping end of August for the patch to be back which means I’ll need four months of the gel & tablet.

Unexpected effect of being smaller was I was told to rub the gel into my upper arm. Tried that but I’d had to rub it over my entire arm because of the amount of gel & it still wasn’t enough skin. I now rub it all over my butt & tummy. That’s only 1 pump. I’d be rubbing it all over my body if it was two pumps. Lol!

PS I found eucalyptus oil really great at removing the sticky residue left on my skin from the patch.

My doctor was originally going to put me on a patch that needed to be changed twice a week but decided to put me on a once a week patch instead. Could your doctor look at maybe switching you to that? I don't need any progesterone, though, because I don't have my uterus, so mine is estrogen only. Still, I know that Femseven Conti is a once a week patch that has both estrogen and progesterone in it.

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