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Today was pretty difficult for me.

As much as my life post bariatric surgery has changed for the better, in many ways wls is still a struggle for me. Sometimes I worry it will always be this way. Feeling “normal” again- maybe I’ll never feel that again. In 20 years I will still be the same as I am now and what are the long term repercussions on my health?

I really struggle with food. Protein is a constant challenge. I find it very very difficult to eat dense protein. It gets stuck so easily, even if I take care to chew the f**k out of it. chicken and I- not friends. Fish is very challenging. Steak is easier but still, it can go badly. I can’t count the number of times I’ve puked up dense protein.

You know that rule, eat your protein first? If I did this I would still be anorexically thin. Once I take a couple bites of protein my restriction is so high I can possibly eat any more. Three bites and done. That’s about it.

Lately everything I eat gives me horrid gas. I’m constantly constipated. I try to get enough Water but drinking between meals, when I need to eat at least six meals a day to get enough calories, is incredibly difficult. When I drink with my meals it’s a gamble as to wether I will dump or throw up, so I try not to. But in my busy busy life I find it so hard to drink outside of my 6 meals, to grab that bottle of water and get it down when my stomach still only takes sips even after so many years out. I get incredibly thirsty when I eat as well. It’s exhausting.

I’m hungry so often. Not physically hungry, although that happens too. But more of a mental hunger or a deep physical anatomical hunger that just feels like I can never really get enough food. I can never, or very very rarely, get quite enough that my body feels truly fed. I’m always in this limbo of not quite satisfied. My stomach prevents me from eating even if my body wants and needs more. I watch other people eat and I envy them. I miss the feeling of true satisfaction and resent the feeling of restriction, especially when I know my body really needs more food!!

Sugar and I- we have a very mixed relationship. I love sugar and I don’t fear it will make me gain weight. Carbs are easier for me to digest than protein and so I rely on the a lot to get the calories I need to not become skeletal again. But carbs can often give me dumping syndrome. I’m constantly playing a game of Russian roulette. Will I dump after this meal? Tonight I dumped horrible after a meal of a turkey sandwich and raspberries. I assume it was the raspberries. It’s a constant condition, one that I go through really hard times over and while sometimes I want to just say- ok! No more carbs- see above issues with protein.

Following the “rules” doesn’t provide a solution to me. Protein is too hard to get down. Water is so hard to get in. My calorie needs are high. I’m having jaw problems now from the stress on my jaw from so much chewing. I’ve seen my surgeon- he says no sugar.

So what’s left for me to eat safely! Protein Shakes? That’s not realistic. And I can barely keep weight on as it is.

What can I swallow and know 100% it won’t get stuck and I won’t dump.

So many people on these forums painting the perfect picture of life after wls. And those feeling like failures when they don’t lose weight.

Well I’m a “success story”. I’m thin.

And I struggle Every. Single. Day.

I wish people would talk more openly and honestly about the long term effects of wls and what it’s like to live with it. What’s it like in an imperfect world for an imperfect person.

My best friend had wls and we talk all the time about these things. It’s nice that I have someone who gets it. When people are considering wls they only want to see the positives but they don’t understand the choice they are making.

Would I make this choice again? Would I trade my health and freedom with food for a day in the body I have now? Probably.

But I’m not sure what that says about me.

Will you do the same? Think about it.

I’m not saying don’t have surgery. I’m not saying I would go back into my old body. That body had lots of problems too. My mind, my body, my life.. I’ll take it now. But wls isn’t for everyone. I’ve had a few friends chose not to do it, and at the time I didn’t understand their decision. In the honeymoon stage you’re on a weight loss high. I rode that high for a long long time. But now.. years out I’m beginning to understand.

Today was a rough day. I have better ones. It would be nice to have a place to get some support for the hard things we go through. Most other people in my life, they can’t understand. For me, having wls is living in a body with chronic digestive illness.

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I'm sorry to hear of all these troubles! You ought to make sure that there are no strictures presently.

Then evaluate how you feel when eating each food "group".

Dairy. Great Protein. Slides right down.

eggs.

Beans. Protein, can be in chili or Soup, thinned refried. Fairly high in calories.

Nuts and cheese. Protein, high calories.

oatmeal. Easy, can add in a ton of stuff.

Potatoes/sweet potatoes.. they actually are a powerhouse.. calories and nutrients.

Hopefully you can eat some of these foods. Try to make a list of things that go down easily but that also contain protein and nutrients. That list can help keep you from dumping, and might help get your nutrition up.

I am only 8 months postop, but don't eat meat with other foods. Meat is a meal by itself, and that is ok! The idea that you can only eat, what, an ounce? That's the problem. How much yogurt or cottage cheese can you eat?

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I sometimes eat meat on its own. I buy these Protein Bites that are soft little pieces of chicken in a 70gm snack pack. I don't have anything with them. I drink Protein Water instead of plain. I figured if I have to drink that much water may as well make use of it. There are lots of smooth Proteins. Some of the Protein Shake tubs are for bulking as well. You might be better with one of those to keep a bit of weight on. I'm no expert and don't pretend to be I'm only 12 weeks post RNY. In the last three months I've had six procedures. The last one was kidney stones requiring 3 surgeries. The surgeries and pain meds put the bowel to sleep so that required bombing with extra laxatives and a fleet enema then ongoing double dose of movicol daily. There are a lot of struggles people don't tell you about. I agree it's not all rosy! But back to the protein I would definitely go liquid and soft and maybe have a scan to make sure there's no stricture

Sent from my CPH1607 using BariatricPal mobile app

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I’m so sorry that you are going through such a crappy time. Can I ask how far out are you?

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I had my surgery dec 2014. So three years.

There are definitely foods I can eat.. I’m not scary thin anymore. My post was more just about the long term difficulty in getting food down as you continue to move away from surgery and just try and live like a normal person. You can’t ever go back to it being easy.

I eat a lot of cheese, that gets me by.


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On 11/18/2017 at 8:40 PM, bellabloom said:

Today was pretty difficult for me.

As much as my life post bariatric surgery has changed for the better, in many ways wls is still a struggle for me. Sometimes I worry it will always be this way. Feeling “normal” again- maybe I’ll never feel that again. In 20 years I will still be the same as I am now and what are the long term repercussions on my health?

I really struggle with food. Protein is a constant challenge. I find it very very difficult to eat dense Protein. It gets stuck so easily, even if I take care to chew the f**k out of it. chicken and I- not friends. Fish is very challenging. Steak is easier but still, it can go badly. I can’t count the number of times I’ve puked up dense protein.

You know that rule, eat your protein first? If I did this I would still be anorexically thin. Once I take a couple bites of protein my restriction is so high I can possibly eat any more. Three bites and done. That’s about it.

Lately everything I eat gives me horrid gas. I’m constantly constipated. I try to get enough Water but drinking between meals, when I need to eat at least six meals a day to get enough calories, is incredibly difficult. When I drink with my meals it’s a gamble as to wether I will dump or throw up, so I try not to. But in my busy busy life I find it so hard to drink outside of my 6 meals, to grab that bottle of Water and get it down when my stomach still only takes sips even after so many years out. I get incredibly thirsty when I eat as well. It’s exhausting.

I’m hungry so often. Not physically hungry, although that happens too. But more of a mental hunger or a deep physical anatomical hunger that just feels like I can never really get enough food. I can never, or very very rarely, get quite enough that my body feels truly fed. I’m always in this limbo of not quite satisfied. My stomach prevents me from eating even if my body wants and needs more. I watch other people eat and I envy them. I miss the feeling of true satisfaction and resent the feeling of restriction, especially when I know my body really needs more food!!

Sugar and I- we have a very mixed relationship. I love sugar and I don’t fear it will make me gain weight. Carbs are easier for me to digest than protein and so I rely on the a lot to get the calories I need to not become skeletal again. But carbs can often give me dumping syndrome. I’m constantly playing a game of Russian roulette. Will I dump after this meal? Tonight I dumped horrible after a meal of a turkey sandwich and raspberries. I assume it was the raspberries. It’s a constant condition, one that I go through really hard times over and while sometimes I want to just say- ok! No more carbs- see above issues with protein.

Following the “rules” doesn’t provide a solution to me. Protein is too hard to get down. Water is so hard to get in. My calorie needs are high. I’m having jaw problems now from the stress on my jaw from so much chewing. I’ve seen my surgeon- he says no sugar.

So what’s left for me to eat safely! Protein Shakes? That’s not realistic. And I can barely keep weight on as it is.

What can I swallow and know 100% it won’t get stuck and I won’t dump.

So many people on these forums painting the perfect picture of life after wls. And those feeling like failures when they don’t lose weight.

Well I’m a “success story”. I’m thin.

And I struggle Every. Single. Day.

I wish people would talk more openly and honestly about the long term effects of wls and what it’s like to live with it. What’s it like in an imperfect world for an imperfect person.

My best friend had wls and we talk all the time about these things. It’s nice that I have someone who gets it. When people are considering wls they only want to see the positives but they don’t understand the choice they are making.

Would I make this choice again? Would I trade my health and freedom with food for a day in the body I have now? Probably.

But I’m not sure what that says about me.

Will you do the same? Think about it.

I’m not saying don’t have surgery. I’m not saying I would go back into my old body. That body had lots of problems too. My mind, my body, my life.. I’ll take it now. But wls isn’t for everyone. I’ve had a few friends chose not to do it, and at the time I didn’t understand their decision. In the honeymoon stage you’re on a weight loss high. I rode that high for a long long time. But now.. years out I’m beginning to understand.

Today was a rough day. I have better ones. It would be nice to have a place to get some support for the hard things we go through. Most other people in my life, they can’t understand. For me, having wls is living in a body with chronic digestive illness.

Surgery is not for everyone. Each of us have stories with our experience with weight loss. Some positive some negative. We see people on this site struggling. Most of the new people are still in the high of the honeymoon phase and will give "follow the rules" advice This may not apply to vet's. This site doesn't have many vets.

Sorry to hear you're struggling tolerating and eating enough food. I'm sure you have tried many food options. My hope is your Dr. can work with you to figure out what's going on with your chronic digestive illness.

It's been some time since we have talked. I recently came back to the site. I'm also three years out. I know that it's never a one size fits all instruction (especially after goal) it seems to be trial and error to dial in what your body needs to be healthy years out.

People need to see the positives and negatives before surgery.

We talked about anorexia, behaviors around exercise and people that binge eat. Some of these issues may have been prior to peoples surgery and some come after surgery. I appreciated your honesty bringing this issue up.

Thinking about how you are doing today,

Jenn

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Surgery is not for everyone. Each of us have stories with our experience with weight loss. Some positive some negative. We see people on this site struggling. Most of the new people are still in the high of the honeymoon phase and will give "follow the rules" advice This may not apply to vet's. This site doesn't have many vets.
Sorry to hear you're struggling tolerating and eating enough food. I'm sure you have tried many food options. My hope is your Dr. can work with you to figure out what's going on with your chronic digestive illness.
It's been some time since we have talked. I recently came back to the site. I'm also three years out. I know that it's never a one size fits all instruction (especially after goal) it seems to be trial and error to dial in what your body needs to be healthy years out.
People need to see the positives and negatives before surgery.
We talked about anorexia, behaviors around exercise and people that binge eat. Some of these issues may have been prior to peoples surgery and some come after surgery. I appreciated your honesty bringing this issue up.
Thinking about how you are doing today,
Jenn



Thank Jenn-
It’s nice to hear from you. How are you doing? It’s so interesting the different perspectives from vets isn’t it.


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5 hours ago, bellabloom said:

I had my surgery dec 2014. So three years.

There are definitely foods I can eat.. I’m not scary thin anymore. My post was more just about the long term difficulty in getting food down as you continue to move away from surgery and just try and live like a normal person. You can’t ever go back to it being easy.

I eat a lot of cheese, that gets me by.

Glad you are not scarey thin. In a perfect bariatric world. I envisioned no longer needing to log food and just maintain and live life. I can get more food in at three years. I have to monitor it. I still have to work at this to maintain my weight.

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2 minutes ago, bellabloom said:


Thank Jenn-
It’s nice to hear from you. How are you doing? It’s so interesting the different perspectives from vets isn’t it.

I'm out the door for a mammogram. I will get back to you soon. I want to catch up.

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I’m 8 days from surgery and I️ worry about my future life. I️ wish I️ had a better understanding of the percentage of patients that struggle every day like you describe. Sounds so exhausting...


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1 hour ago, Lainey H said:

I’m 8 days from surgery and I️ worry about my future life. I️ wish I️ had a better understanding of the percentage of patients that struggle every day like you describe. Sounds so exhausting...

It's my understanding that these long term complications are less than 10%. (Which means over 90 people out of a hundred DON'T have a problem).

The most common issues:

Acid reflux happens regularly in sleevers

Vitamin deficiencies happen to almost everyone at some point.

About 10% of patients need to have their gallbladders out, but that is an acute issue that can be solved (and possibly prevented with Actigall).

It's good to know what you could be signing up for. Surgery definitely has risks, but fortunately the most dire of them happen only rarely (maybe 5%).

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It's my understanding that these long term complications are less than 10%. (Which means over 90 people out of a hundred DON'T have a problem).

The most common issues:

Acid reflux happens regularly in sleevers

Vitamin deficiencies happen to almost everyone at some point.

About 10% of patients need to have their gallbladders out, but that is an acute issue that can be solved (and possibly prevented with Actigall).

It's good to know what you could be signing up for. Surgery definitely has risks, but fortunately the most dire of them happen only rarely (maybe 5%).

That is just not true.

Yes less than 10% have dire consequences. But it’s crazy to think there aren’t consequences.

YOU REMOVE MOST OF YOUR STOMACH.

If you think food will ever be the same to you, think again. It won’t. Eating will never be the same. And many many people don’t even lose all their weight and many regain. And they still have to live with the physical changes.

I’m not trying to be negative, just being real. Go into this with your eyes open. It’s a choice your making and a risk your taking. Are you willing to struggle with food for the rest of your life and to be different than how others can eat in return for weightloss?

For me the answer was yes. And I would do it again I think. It’s been three years. In three more years I may have changed my mind. It’s getting harder for me to live this way.

This surgery is a big commitment. There isn’t any going back. It’s gonna change things forever. Many many people struggle with dumping, food getting stuck, acid reflux, constipation, vitamin issues, and just the process of eating being difficult when it takes you two hours to eat what everyone else can eat in five minutes. When it is a stressful thing just to figure out what you can eat in a situation that won’t make you sick. It’s reality for many many many.

Let’s be real.

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I’m 8 days from surgery and I️ worry about my future life. I️ wish I️ had a better understanding of the percentage of patients that struggle every day like you describe. Sounds so exhausting...





I wish I could tell you I knew you wouldn’t. It’s different for everyone. Just make sure it’s worth it to you. I’m still happy with the results from my surgery. I would do it again. Take heart, maybe it will be easier for you!


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Glad you are not scarey thin. In a perfect bariatric world. I envisioned no longer needing to log food and just maintain and live life. I can get more food in at three years. I have to monitor it. I still have to work at this to maintain my weight.


I think that’s pretty realistic for most people. It’s easy to regain. Maybe I’m lucky and just have a fast metabolism or maybe I consume less than I think.. but intuitive eating has worked well for me. I still think healing the metabolism and feeding the body well is a key to stepping away from dieting. Have you ever considered it?


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Bellabloom, did you have gastric sleeve or Roux-en-Y?

I have read there are more lifetime side effects associated with Roux-en-Y. More danger of dumping, more danger of Vitamin deficiency.

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