Jump to content
×
Are you looking for the BariatricPal Store? Go now!

PLEASE HELP the skeptic in me. Doesn't starving = eventual weight gain??



Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, FluffyChix said:

WLS allows for a metabolic reset of your fat storage/energy system. It allows your body chemistry (super complicated) to defend a lower set-point, but google Dr. Matthew Weiner on The YouTube and watch all of his videos and you will learn about it.

Unlike what @VIN_IN_AL says, my program (major university) told me no caloric threshold for calories. My real advice (RNY) was to get 60-80g of lean, dense, low fat Protein in daily from as many sources as possible for diversification, to eat 1-2 bites of low glycemic veggies, and don't eat much fat--but if I did, to use tiny bits of healthy fat. And to get in 64oz Water + daily Vitamins. Beyond that, they were fully aware that during WLM (weight loss mode) I averaged between 650-850 calories per day and my sweet spot seemed to be something like 750cals. The doctor and my RD never said a word about it, nor did either encourage me to artificially inflate my calories because of some mythical theoretical mumbo jumbo just to hit some "magic threshold" to prevent "starvation mode" (a myth).

I hit first goal at around 8-9months despite having a crapton of metabolic issues and shortcomings including being on a cancer drug that shuts down my hormones and causes weight gain in most people. (See the rest in my signature). I'm now maintaining at 131lbs this morning at 1100 cals average. That means preferentially some days I eat 700-800 cals per day (3 days per week) and some days I eat as much as 1400-1500 cals per day depending on appetite or what I'm doing. Over the week it averages to about 1100 cals.

I'm not in starvation. My Vitamin status at two years is fabulous and there ya have it.

Wow. Congratulations! You are certainly a role model!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

57 minutes ago, Mello1 said:

Wow. Congratulations! You are certainly a role model!

Definitely not a role model. LOL. Just another shmo trying to hack our broken bodies in an ongoing n=1 experiment called life. :) I'm fabulously flawed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, MaybeMeow said:

Truly. I’m asking myself (and others like you who have been through this) these tough questions because like most, I assume, I have doubts about maintaining. I’m not sure I have the will to eat so little... forever.

I am NEVER hungry. I feel stuffed all the time. I eat a lot of plant based foods which are very filling and very nutritious. I never feel deprived. I would never have "the will to eat so little...forever." You don't have to! It's all about what kind of foods you eat. Honestly, I wake up and get on the scale every morning, just knowing I must have gained weight, since I ate so much the day before, but the gain doesn't happen. For example, today I have already eaten a bowl of cooked grain Cereal, with milk, raisins, gogi berries, and a sliced apple. Then I had at 1 1/2 cup of shepherd's pie for lunch, an orange, a kiwi, grapes, and a cup of cooked greens. Then two cups of raw veggies for munchies in the afternoon. (Red cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, red and greed pepper, radishes). Then a rice cake with Peanut Butter, and some nuts. That is BEFORE dinner. For dinner I will have a plate of General Tso's tofu over rice and stir fry vegetables. Later I will have popcorn and yogurt with berries, seeds, and granola. Does that sound like a little? It sure doesn't feel like it. I am eating better than I have in my entire life, and feeling great with 110 pounds gone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for these responses. Truly. I’m asking myself (and others like you who have been through this) these tough questions because like most, I assume, I have doubts about maintaining. I’m not sure I have the will to eat so little... forever. I absolutely admire those who do. But I find myself wondering if they are simply more disciplined than I am. I’m going to do some more reading about how the surgery “resets” metabolism. Easy to say but what does it really mean and how does this happen? While I understand the removal of the part of the stomach that creates a hunger hormone I’m not sure how it’s all reset for the better since you immediately move forward by eating so little and it seems hunger does eventually return. Yes, I will be talking to my surgeon and dietician. As a matter of fact my husband is an excellent internal medicine doc so I have the “ medical” resources handy. I also know their insight can’t compare to those who have lived it. So thank you so much.

incidentally, on the HCG diet forum 10 years ago everyone thought it all worked so well and was a huge gift, reset etc too. Now it’s been recognized as a significant detriment to long term heath. So I’m determined to make sure long term living in the real world is possible.

__________________________________________________

Is anyone here 10 years out and successful? Again, thank you greatly! Most long term surgery patients have no need for site. They have moved on and life is normal. I hope one is around to answer your question.

Surgery isn't for everyone. enjoy researching and do whats best for you, Long term can be done. I will be 6 years out in June, 254 lbs to 130 lbs I've been maintaining in the 130's years out.

Pre surgery: My past diets attempt's were not realistic or sustainable long term. I would regain with extra weight each time. I questioned if surgery would work, will i feel deprived/starving, would I regain, would I regret this? Surgery is nothing like my past diet attempts. (I've tried them all)

My experience I have no regrets in my decision to have surgery.

Hunger feels nothing like before surgery. Post-op It's manageable. I now have a sensation of full and I'm satisfied on the amount of food I can eat with the sleeve.

First stages: Your stomach restriction is tight after surgery, Your stomach is healing and calories are low,

Real food stage: Surgery restriction will slowly relax. You will be able to eat more food and calories. Food is still flavorful and I don't feel deprived.( I eat healthy versions of pizza, hamburgers etc ) My tasted buds have changed. I now love food that I didn't like in the past.

Maintenance phase food plan: After you reach your goal weight, You increase calories, fats and carbohydrates to stop your weight loss. I indulge within reason. When I have a slight gain, I go back to weight loss phase calories to stay in my weight range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You ask a great question that most of us had to consider when deciding whether or not to have WLS. I did an Optifast program for 8 months that wrecked my metabolism (500 cals/day for 8 months, duh of course it messed me up.) But when I went to the medical literature, it was pretty clear that WLS gives people the best chance of maintaining a healthy weight, and most do. I didn't make this decision lightly, and I knew that I'd be committing to a healthy life from this point forward. Surgery has made that an easier process for me, and these forums have helped me troubleshoot my own personal challenges along the way. Ultimately, I was confident that I could lose weight doing any number of diets, but what I really wanted in the second half of my life was a tool to help me achieve and MAINTAIN a healthier weight. That is why I decided to have the gastric sleeve surgery. Best of luck to you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yes, I too did the hcg diet through physicians weight loss program and lost and then gained. That frustration is what made me look into surgery options. I had the sleeve 2 years ago in May . I feel that I East normal portions now. Not what I pre-op but a normal portion. For Breakfast my daughter took us out to eat, I comfortably ate 2 silver dollar sized multigrain pancakes, 2 egg whites and 1 turkey sausage link. I was still full at lunchtime, so didn’t eat. For dinner I had a piece of kielbasa and sauerkraut. I don’t feel deprived. I usually have coffee in the mornings. I drink Water or tea during the day. I am no longer losing weight so I’d probably have to make strict diet and exercise changes to lose more, but I’ve kept off what I’ve lost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, HappyHikerGal said:

But when I went to the medical literature, it was pretty clear that WLS gives people the best chance of maintaining a healthy weight, and most do.

That's a very optimistic thing to say. True, WLS is the best (if not the only) chance at the moment but that most people reach and maintain a healthy weight (which would mean 100% EWL)... the studies out there don't say so. At least I've never stumbled across a one that claimed that most patients reach and maintain a 100% EWL after WLS.

Anyway, one doesn't need to reach a normal weight of getting tremendous health benefits. And what's a "healthy" weight... not sure if that is really the same as what fits the definition of "normal" weight these days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, summerset said:

That's a very optimistic thing to say. True, WLS is the best (if not the only) chance at the moment but that most people reach and maintain a healthy weight (which would mean 100% EWL)... the studies out there don't say so. At least I've never stumbled across a one that claimed that most patients reach and maintain a 100% EWL after WLS.

Anyway, one doesn't need to reach a normal weight of getting tremendous health benefits. And what's a "healthy" weight... not sure if that is really the same as what fits the definition of "normal" weight these days.

True - I got to a normal BMI, and my surgeon said I'm one of only about 10% of his patients who do. The medical literature seems to back that up - I've read anywhere from 10-15%. Makes sense since the average is 70% of excess weight lost. Those of us out on the far end of that statistical curve (either side of it) are going to be few...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 3/2/2020 at 3:56 PM, FluffyChix said:

Definitely not a role model. LOL. Just another shmo trying to hack our broken bodies in an ongoing n=1 experiment called life. :) I'm fabulously flawed!

She is sooooo a role model for us all! In fact because she is human and flawed we like her all the more. Not to mention she is THE most supportive and helpful person on bariatricpal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

5 minutes ago, Krestel said:

She is sooooo a role model for us all! In fact because she is human and flawed we like her all the more. Not to mention she is THE most supportive and helpful person on bariatricpal.

Ok, not true. But to steal from @GreenTealael, now I'm ugly cryin'!!! :57_cry:

Edited by FluffyChix

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 03/04/2020 at 02:22, summerset said:






That's a very optimistic thing to say. True, WLS is the best (if not the only) chance at the moment but that most people reach and maintain a healthy weight (which would mean 100% EWL)... the studies out there don't say so. At least I've never stumbled across a one that claimed that most patients reach and maintain a 100% EWL after WLS.




Anyway, one doesn't need to reach a normal weight of getting tremendous health benefits. And what's a "healthy" weight... not sure if that is really the same as what fits the definition of "normal" weight these days.



5’7”, female, 51YO, 13 months post VGS.
HW: 262
SW: 246
GW: 155
CW: 134-137

MANY of us who are WLS all start in different places and have had different routes getting there.
I personally think that the human body is a wonderful and mysteriously frustrating thing.
As an adult, spent many years “normal” or slightly “under normal” body weight. It was only when I hit my late 20’s that I became MO. And stayed there for 22 years.

When I had WLS, I had to maintain my BMI (which was hovering right at 40) for 8 months so I could stay qualified. I’d love to see insurance companies lower that number to 35, because I could’ve been practicing healthier habits in the months leading up to WLS rather than INTENTIONALLY trying to keep my weight >252.

My point here is that I hit a “normal” BMI fairly rapidly-within 8 months of WLS- and I’m now struggling to keep my weight over 135. I feel like most of that was because I had a lower-than-typical SW, and that my body “remembers” being a skinny girl as a teen and young adult and therefore when I got my resetting from WLS, my body adjusted beautifully.
I’ve lost >110 pounds from my surgery date, which is way over 100% EBF.
I’m not a super-hero, I just happened to be a girl who (mostly) followed what her team recommended, worked out, and did my homework daily,weekly, and monthly to get and stay on track.

Honestly it take me getting creative some days and I still struggle trying to get in >1000 calories sometimes bc I refuse to eat crap.
Other than dealing with a weird Tomato and Kimchi craving right now, I’m not feeling deprived at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 3/2/2020 at 4:28 AM, FluffyChix said:

WLS allows for a metabolic reset of your fat storage/energy system. It allows your body chemistry (super complicated) to defend a lower set-point, but google Dr. Matthew Weiner on The YouTube and watch all of his videos and you will learn about it.

In another thread, a poster wrote that this metabolic reset only lasts about a year and then our metabolism returns to what it was prior to surgery. (Creepy thought). Is this true or a myth? Any literature where I might read something about it either way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Prestonandme said:

In another thread, a poster wrote that this metabolic reset only lasts about a year and then our metabolism returns to what it was prior to surgery. (Creepy thought). Is this true or a myth? Any literature where I might read something about it either way?

I've never heard this. Malabsorption of calories in RNY patients only lasts a couple of years, but I've never heard anything about the change in metabolism being temporary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

On 3/1/2020 at 10:08 PM, MaybeMeow said:

I appreciate your response and the link. It says right in this document... “ most post-op bariatric patients need to consume less than 1000 calories a day in order to maintain weight loss.”

1000 calories a day is a starvation diet Not a maintenance diet. This troubles me greatly. How can this be healthy long term? Meaning live to be 90 long term? Thank you for going to bat with me on this. I’m really having trouble with seeing how this is a forever option

On 3/1/2020 at 10:08 PM, MaybeMeow said:

I appreciate your response and the link. It says right in this document... “ most post-op bariatric patients need to consume less than 1000 calories a day in order to maintain weight loss.”

1000 calories a day is a starvation diet Not a maintenance diet. This troubles me greatly. How can this be healthy long term? Meaning live to be 90 long term? Thank you for going to bat with me on this. I’m really having trouble with seeing how this is a forever option.

I recently read, and can't find, an article about real longevity as it relates to a restricted calorie diet and how the body naturally thrives on calorie restrictions when the diet is based on nutrient density and whole foods mostly plant and Protein based. Lots of talk about reversing chronic disease and inflammation metabolic syndrome and people living into their 90 and 100s and having health and energy using this method. Primarily low calorie and high nutrition density. Dr Joel Furman has some great books about this.

Edited by ShortBuddah710

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recent Topics

  • Most popular:

  • Together, we have lost...
      lbs
    ×