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How to Convince Dr. that DS is Right For Me



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Hello, all! My consult with my surgery center's DS specialist is this Thursday. I already know that my surgery center only performs the DS procedure on a case by case basis. I've already met the over 50 BMI requirement. I've put together a PROS/CONS list between the DS and RNY, but every Fiber of my being is telling me that DS is the one for me. I have put together a list for the doctor "proving" my case...with a list of legitimate reasons why he should agree to DS. I am a very organized and detail-oriented person, and so I really don't think that the strict Vitamin & Protein regimen will be an issue. Is there anything else that you can think of that might help "plead my case"?

THANKS! :)

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I was a 51 BMI and struggled with the decision. After all my research, discussions and long nights I settled in on RNY. My biggest reason is I am traveling 90% of the time and constant business/training meetings where I am presenting. I was truly worried about uncontrolled bowel movements when not able to step out of a session. I am 5'7" and have lost 120lbs in less than 10 months. I still have 50 lbs to go, but I feel like it was the right choice for me. I look back and think that even if I didn't travel I would have made the choice for RNY. If I was at a higher BMI I would have wanted the DS and would have my lists prepared as you do. Just know that if the physician sticks to RNY, it is still a great opportunity to change your life!

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My surgeon plans to do a VSG, and told me if needed, it can be converted to a DS (several years down the road). He explained to me why he chose the VSG (I have bone spurs and other orthopedic problems, and he said anti-inflammatories are easier with the VSG than any of the other choices). I had gone into his office expecting him to recommend the RNY, but after he explained his reasoning, I was satisfied with his knowledge and experience.

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I am retired now, but one thing I learned as a people/project supervisor is that the one with the most documentation wins! You sound like you have done your homework.

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I was 56 BMI when I first saw my surgeon. I actually opted not to even get the bypass and the sleeve instead. It can always be converted later. Thus far I have had great success being down 25lbs in the first 3 weeks out of surgery. My gut feeling as a nurse is that if your having to convince the surgeon it might not be the right choice for you.

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I was significantly influenced by individuals on other websites who fed me their opinion that DS was "the only way to go". Everyone is entitled to their opinion. I went to my surgeon making a case for DS and his assessment was otherwise (he initially recommended RNY). I ultimately changed my mind three times, including the week of the surgery.

I recently saw a statistic that only 1% of bariatric surgeries are DS. For me, VSG has filled the need (down 100# in four months (today)). If your case is significantly different than the others, you may be in the 1%, but when I looked at patients in the waiting area, physically people appeared to be worse off than I was .

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The Duodenum Switch is mostly recommended for metabolic syndrome. It is recommended for people with hard to control diabetes and no excess weight. Without the restriction RNY and VSG provide your hunger will still be there. Hunger hormones are produced in your stomach and if it remains intact there will be no relief in that front. It will be so hard to control your hunger as you are likely to eat too much food for a shorter intestine to handle. This is why having issues with loose bowel movements occurs. If you think you can control your food intake in this manner I don't believe you need surgery.

Of course this is a decision you and your doctor have to make. Be an advocate for yourself but listen as well. Your doctor has a lot more experience in this field then you. The way I look at it is. You are an expert on YOU and the doctor is an expert on WLS. A winning combination, right!

I went to many support groups before I made my decision. Any hospital or doctor performing WLS has them. I can tell you it opened my eyes. I also researched and read everything I could. I read just about every study published in the past 10 years. Yes, 100s of hours of research. Consider the sources. The New England Journal of Medicine is not the same thing as Google searches.

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@@sarah-tiffany, just a rhetorical question, are you sure the doctor has done DS's before?

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Thank you, everyone, for your ideas and advice. I really appreciate the input! :)

I am fortunate enough to be in the hands of a surgery center that has been recognized as a Bariatric Surgery Center of Excellence from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. I have faith that my surgeon will ultimately make the right choice for ME...I don't know if that means I will have the DS, but I am confident in his recommendation, no matter what that might be.

I will know more on Thursday when I meet with my surgeon. I'm getting very nervous, but also SO ready & excited for what my future holds. I'll be sure to update throughout my journey. Thanks again!!! :D

Edited by sarah-tiffany

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You sound as if you have your info. and research together. Definitely bring it w/you. I brought a giant accordion folder with everything I'd found and learned about why I wanted the DS. I'd even bring a large pill holder if you have one; to show you're ready to comply with the requirements. Perhaps a Protein book illustrating how much Protein is in each food. Just as much as you can do to show your doctor you feel the DS is the right surgery for you.

Mine didn't feel I needed it. I did.

Edited by Postop

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When I was making the decision between rny and gastric sleeve I was going to the bypass based on that extra few % of excess weight loss but ultimately I realized that I needed to have the least invasive surgery possible that would still get the job down.

I'm not sure why people are so gung ho about the DS. Is it all about the weight?

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Without the restriction RNY and VSG provide your hunger will still be there. Hunger hormones are produced in your stomach and if it remains intact there will be no relief in that front. It will be so hard to control your hunger as you are likely to eat too much food for a shorter intestine to handle. This is why having issues with loose bowel movements occurs. If you think you can control your food intake in this manner I don't believe you need surgery.

The DS actually does provide restriction, the same as VSG. It just goes a step above that with malabsorption.

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