Jump to content
×
Are you looking for the BariatricPal Store? Go now!

Are there other diabetics in here who have to take an A1c



Recommended Posts

On 4/14/2018 at 11:42 PM, charismatic said:

Sometimes some of the stuff I see on this board sounds like some surgeons only want perfect patients. That’s their choice but being perfect did not get most of us here and to make the choice to have WLS. I’m glad some surgeons do higher risk cases or a lot of people that really need this tool would be SOL.

It's not about perfect patients, it's about keeping the chances of short-term and long-term complications low. My dad's A1c hovered around 10 for years, and that was with numerous medications and insulin injections several times a day. When he had to have knee surgery, he had all kinds of issues with the wound healing properly. He had to see a wound specialist and go on several different kinds of antibiotics before the situation resolved itself (and it took months). Why a surgeon would want to risk that, I can't say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are risks to surgery no matter what. So don't give me that crap about your father staying at 10 Ac1 for years and that it affected his knee surgery and applying that logic to sleeve surgery. I have never heard from my health care providers yet about my A1c. Can you tell me why not? But what I am concerned about is that I could be denied sleeve surgery if my A1c is too high. Why not tell me that early on? Why wait a week until my surgery to tell me? Thats unethical. Maybe going to an attorney may be the route to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

High A1c means your diabetes is not controlled, which means there's a higher chance of complications related to healing. You can't argue with statistics or handwave them with "well, there are risks no matter what." There are risks to crossing the street, but it's riskier if you've been huffing paint before you do it.

Personally speaking, my checklist of items that needed to be completed before my surgeon would attempt to obtain authorization from my insurance company included "get your A1c below 7." It was right there, in big bold letters. Since mine was a little over 6 at the time, it was a moot point.

Frankly, I'm not sure why you've spent 3 days freaking out on here when you could've called your surgeon and had your answer by now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
53 minutes ago, apositivelife4me said:

There are risks to surgery no matter what. So don't give me that crap about your father staying at 10 Ac1 for years and that it affected his knee surgery and applying that logic to sleeve surgery. I have never heard from my health care providers yet about my A1c. Can you tell me why not? But what I am concerned about is that I could be denied sleeve surgery if my A1c is too high. Why not tell me that early on? Why wait a week until my surgery to tell me? Thats unethical. Maybe going to an attorney may be the route to go.

Please just go ahead and call your surgeon's office and ask for their guidelines and what they would be willing to do to work with you if they have an A1c threshold for surgery. When I had my consult back in September, my A1c was over 11. My surgeon told me to work with my endocrinologist to get it under 8 (his threshold) in order to avoid complications, but that if I wasn't able to do that, he would speak with my endocrinologist, and we would find a way to do the surgery if possible, knowing that I may have difficulty with infections and wound healing. I have been fortunate to be able to get my A1c down to 6.0 and feel much better about having limited my risk for complications. It makes most sense to speak with your surgeon and determine the best course of action for you.

Edited by brightfaith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, brightfaith said:

Please just go ahead and call your surgeon's office and ask for their guidelines and what they would be willing to do to work with you if they have an A1c threshold for surgery. When I had my consult back in September, my A1c was over 11. My surgeon told me to work with my endocrinologist to get it under 8 (his threshold) in order to avoid complications, but that if I wasn't able to do that, he would speak with my endocrinologist, and we would find a way to do the surgery if possible, knowing that I may have difficulty with infections and wound healing. I have been fortunate to be able to get my A1c down to 6.0 and feel much better about having limited my risk for complications. It makes most sense to speak with your surgeon and determine the best course of action for you.

Ok thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am the first one in here to bring up the topic of A1c so it must not be that big of a deal. My thing is I have waited 8 months for my surgery and no one on my health care team has ever mentioned to me anything about my A1c. That is what I am concerned about. And my question is why haven't they?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are worse things than having an A1c of 10.

1. eating and drinking things like pizza, huge meals, drinking alcohol days after the weight loss surgery.

2. Binge eating and drinking right after surgery.

These things can keep a person from healing properly too. We hear a lot about these things but not about A1c.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, apositivelife4me said:

I am the first one in here to bring up the topic of A1c so it must not be that big of a deal. My thing is I have waited 8 months for my surgery and no one on my health care team has ever mentioned to me anything about my A1c. That is what I am concerned about. And my question is why haven't they?

I think your surgeon's office is the only one that can answer this for you. Giving them a call will help resolve this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my surgeon, while I have a surgery date now, wants my A1C down about a 1/2 point and said we'll do a test about 2 weeks before surgery. the reason is because the higher your A1C, the higher chance of infection afterwards. He did say that if it was too high, he would 'give me more time to get it down'. meaning I could have my date pushed back. so i'm working HARD to get there and not have any delays.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, apositivelife4me said:

There are worse things than having an A1c of 10.

1. eating and drinking things like pizza, huge meals, drinking alcohol days after the weight loss surgery.

2. Binge eating and drinking right after surgery.

These things can keep a person from healing properly too. We hear a lot about these things but not about A1c.

Yes there's also worse things than delaying or canceling a surgery. Like getting hit by an Asteroid.

The fact is if you have a documented record of your a1c on paper and anything bad happens it's a clear cut case of negligent behavior by the surgical team, and opens the door to liability and lawsuits by the hospital and surgical team as well as them eating the cost of any complications. Why they would proceed without during their due diligence is beyond me.

And you've made it blatantly clear that you haven't cleaned up your diet at all so that your BMI still qualifies.

You can eat lots of calories without eating garbage allowing your blood sugar to go all over the place. Complex carbohydrates, nuts fats less lean meats coconut/dairy cream are all high in calories allowing you to maintain your weight without spiking your blood sugar up and down.

But it sounds like that's not the answer you want to hear.

Why your surgical team hasn't addressed it is beyond me. It's possible they don't give a ****, it's possible they're unorganized, it's possible they didn't look at it because your PCP did the lab work, or it's possible that it's something they won't address until the last minute.

You have two choices. Address the issue, or continue to try to convince people on the internet that it's not a big deal and roll the dice with whatever happens

Edited by Mhy12784

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Mhy12784 said:

Yes there's also worse things than delaying or canceling a surgery. Like getting hit by an Asteroid.

The fact is if you have a documented record of your a1c on paper and anything bad happens it's a clear cut case of negligent behavior by the surgical team, and opens the door to liability and lawsuits by the hospital and surgical team as well as them eating the cost of any complications. Why they would proceed without during their due diligence is beyond me.

And you've made it blatantly clear that you haven't cleaned up your diet at all so that your BMI still qualifies.

You can eat lots of calories without eating garbage allowing your blood sugar to go all over the place. Complex carbohydrates, nuts fats less lean meats coconut/dairy cream are all high in calories allowing you to maintain your weight without spiking your blood sugar up and down.

But it sounds like that's not the answer you want to hear.

Why your surgical team hasn't addressed it is beyond me. It's possible they don't give a ****, it's possible they're unorganized, it's possible they didn't look at it because your PCP did the lab work, or it's possible that it's something they won't address until the last minute.

You have two choices. Address the issue, or continue to try to convince people on the internet that it's not a big deal and roll the dice with whatever happens

Thank you for your kind reply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Featured Surgeons

    1. Masoud Rezvani

      Woodbridge, Virginia 22191

    2. Lisa Medvetz

      Downingtown, Pennsylvania 19335
      800-282-0066

  • Recent Topics

  • Recent Status Updates

    • Ladybug57

      How does drinking 3 liters of water pre-op impact your surgery/
      · 0 replies
      1. This update has no replies.
    • boringtessa

      I am struggling.  I've been depressed, so I've felt totally "over it" in terms of staying on plan.  While I've mostly been eating what I should be eating (but erring most on the side of fatty foods), I'm eating way too much throughout the day, having many small meals even when I'm not hungry because I'm sitting at home bored,  I'm exhausted and dehydrated and can't get myself to sleep less than 10-12 hours let alone exercise (even roller skating, which I love).  I feel like am doing this all wrong and am paying the price with a stall.
      · 1 reply
      1. Healthy_life

        I am sorry to hear you are struggling. Do what you need to do to stay healthy mentally and physically. I hope you can get to the other side of your depression. Hang in there.

    • jrmolina2006

      Everything was going so good and now im dealing with GOUT!!!! I dont want to bring my protein take down but its causing my gout.
      · 0 replies
      1. This update has no replies.
    • MarkLewis

      I had my VSG on 11/19/18. All went very smoothly at the hospital, I was able to get up and walk a bunch, and was discharged at 11 am the next morning. Unfortunately, at about day 6 I noticed that I had thrush and am still taking meds to get rid of it. The first was Nystatin and now on Diclofenac. I also got VERY constipated from the iron supplements, but luckily some Miralax unclogged me. My highest ever weight was 319lbs, I was 282lbs at my first visit with my surgeon and 270lbs on my surgery date. As of this morning, December 9th I am 245lbs.
      · 2 replies
      1. Orchids&Dragons

        Welcome to the site and congrats on your success so far. Sounds like you're doing great! Hope to see you in the forums.

      2. RayLandry

        you are doing great Mark! Keep on keeping on (off)!

    • Cmarie91

      Hey, I’m new here!
      · 3 replies
      1. shedo82773

        Welcome!!

      2. Cmarie91

        Thank you!!

      3. thedutch

        Hello and welcome

  • Trending Topics

  • Magazine Articles

    1. Dealing with Family during the Holidays

      Posted in: Mental Health
      Ash Krupnik
    2. You Are NOT What You Eat

      Posted in: Mental Health
      Warren L. Huberman, PhD.
    3. Surviving the Thanksgiving Table: A Few Hacks

      Posted in: Food & Nutrition
      Alex Brecher
    4. Thanksgiving Tips You Can Use

      Posted in: Post-Op Support
      Alex Brecher
    5. Got Your Guard Up for Holiday Season?

      Posted in: Support
      Alex Brecher
  • Together, we have lost...
      lbs
    ×