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WLS is the easy way out



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I really think they'll put it all back on in 2 years. I'm 15 months out and maintaining okay. I exercise 2 hours a take my fitness tracker says my total daily calorie burn is 3,000+ calories. I'm eating about 1,500 average.

I know a lot of skinny women who eat more than I do and stay skinny.

I think we're wired differently, maybe from birth, or maybe from overeating in our past.

The point is, if I didn't have the sleeve and it's dear restriction, I know I'd be back up 100 lbs in 2 years!

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When the "easy way out" has demonstrated superior long-term efficacy, it's smarter to choose it over the "hard way". I don't think rubbing sticks together to make a fire when you're cold is more noble than using a lighter that's available. Our lives are filled with inventions that help us to take a way that is easier than the "natural" ones our ancestors used. When someone has an illness that modern medicine can treat effectively and with minimal risk, we don't just encourage that person to endure it. Or at least we as society shouldn't. Obesity is an illness, and WLS is the most effective treatment for it.

Most of us have lost weight the "hard way." Many times. Statistically, the majority of people who've been significantly overweight do not maintain their loss, and for those who are obese the odds are even more pessimistic. Though many people do eventually regain a portion of their weight over time, WLS still has proven through numerous studies to be the best resolution for treating obesity.

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Yeah, because paying $500-$12,000 is "easy". Only drinking liquid for 1-4 weeks is "easy". Having 5-6 holes put into you is "easy". Dealing with CO2 gas pain is "easy". Avoiding eating and drinking at the same time is "easy".

These people frustrate me. I saw something like this a few weeks ago from a news reporter who posted something on FB about a guy who lost a bunch of weight, and that he did it the "right" way. Last time I checked, as long as you're making changes to get healthier, it's considered the "right" way.

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@@suzzzzz As usual, we're on the same page about this! When I tell people I've had WLS, I don't even give them the opportunity to offer anything but either silence or support. I tell them that I had the surgery because I couldn't live at the weight I was any longer, that I was sick and in pain, that I've lost weight so many times but can't keep it off. That I decided to use a tool available to me to improve my life and my lifespan.

If some asshole wants to quibble with my choice, the only thing they show is their lack of character, IMO. I sincerely do not CARE whether others think I took the 'easy way', or that I didn't try hard enough to be thin without surgery. This is about ME and no one else...and for me, this has been easier so far. My surgery was a breeze, and my post-op time has been relatively problem free. I'm thinner, more attractive, healthier and happier. Who can possibly have issue with that? Not anyone whose opinion matters to me, that's for sure.

Someone a few posts back said something about confidence coming with age...I couldn't agree more. I'm 52, I'm smart and capable and I don't care what other people think about the choices I make for myself.

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I think it's because being obese is considered a moral failing in our society. So consciously or not, people think we should have to suffer for our "sins".

Sent from my iPad using the BariatricPal App

To quote Dr. Lustig, from his book, Fat Chance (2014):

"It's from (the) perception of choice that we derive our current societal mantras around obesity: gluttony and sloth, two of the original 'seven deadly sins.' (...) people exhibiting the other five deadly sins (...) have gotten a pass in the press and in society as a whole. ...

We've found absolution for nearly every vice and sin we can commit, except for these two. They continue to defy our society's ability to forgive. This despite the fact that 55 percent of Americans are either overweight or obese. Thin people are now in the minority, yet our culture continues to punish the majority. ...

Our society continues to glorify thinness even though it appears to be less achievable every year. Those of us who are overweight or obese are immediately assumed to be gluttons and/or sloths. (...) From this condemnation, it's a quick jump to the determination that obese people became so due to a behavioral defect."

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There is no person on this earth that knows me that can say I have had it easy or that I took the easy way out.I am so truly amazed by how successful my wls education campaign has been at work and with friends.there were a few people at work that had it done and they got so much shade.I think with myself being the biggest they knew to not even go there.Now they go in and talk to bariatric patients about qualifying for WLS even when the Dr. is anxious about the conversation.

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It's sort of like having babies. Your baby isn't better if you had it without a cesarian or without anesthesia. It's just delivered differently. I never understood getting "macho" about how babies are born. The most important thing about the baby is that it is born!

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18 months into it, I feel like WLS makes weight loss easy. This is the easiest I have ever lost weight, and the fastest.

That doesn't mean it has been easy, but it has been far easier than anything in the paat.

I don't talk about my surgery, so I don't have to hear dumb comments and I did this mainly because I don't care about other people's opinions on my choices.

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In 2012, I was in a near fatal car accident when my seatbelt didn't work right and I was thrown through a windshield, until the seatbelt ran out of give, and I was thrown into the back seat. I had a hip replacement, ankle joint repair with titanium hardware, and a broken arm. I broke almost all of my ribs (which contributed to something they called flail chest), shattered my sternum, broke both sides of my collarbone, had a skull fracture and completely crushed my thoracic spine. I had 7 surgeries, but refused spinal surgery. I spent 9 months in a wheelchair, I had to learn to walk again, and I suffer from long term memory loss (and lots of security problems at the airport because I'm bionic now). I was 19, and my father was thrilled that I declined spinal surgery. He told me that having surgery would be dangerous (LOL after everything else I'd already gone through) and that fixing my spine surgically would be taking the easy way out. I was enraged.

People like my dad, and people who view this surgery as "taking the easy way out" have zero clue what they're talking about. Quite frankly, I think any individual who would chose to demean your life choices instead of supporting a decision that you have made to better yourself is not your time, before or after surgery. You are doing this for yourself, and if you've thought about the decision and focused on the positives and the new life that you will have when all is said and done, you will realize that your self worth and your importance and your VALUE is more then anyone's negative words. You are important, strong and smart. You are capable of making an informed, educated decision, and no one's words should stand in your way.

Man, I was fired up about that. I'm good now haha.

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I've been considering this surgery for about 15 years... It is not something I just jumped into... Yesterday, because of many stressors in our life right now, my husband lashed out at me and told me " You're just taking the easy way out, If you would just TRY and commit to 3-4 years of really hard work you could do it on your own!"

Uh, um.... I wanted to lash out, to tell him where the bear went in the woods... But I prayed and thought about it for a couple of hours. In the end I wrote him a letter, and attached testimonies from Dr and patients, along with research. At about 10:00 last night we finally talked.

He understands what I'm going through, and He reminded me of all the stress we have been under. He said he still feels that way and is not a proponent of WLS, but he supports me in my choice. He told me to schedule the surgery and we will get through it.

I'm still sad at his response. I know it is stress, But I have been praying on my own and together with him. I know this is the best and right thing for me.

My date will be February 7th, at Bariatrix FL with Dr. Amit Taggar.

I know God is BLESSING me daily! I know He will walk with me! I'm ready!

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@@50yearoldme A good marriage is not one that never has problems, but one where the two people work those problems out successfully. It took me many years to get to the point of surgery because Mrs. LittleBill was adamantly against it. We had two friends die as a result of surgery, or complications, years ago.

When I finally approached her with it, she wasn't completely sold, but was determined to support me. At some point, I don't remember exactly when, she came over completely and is now very enthusiastic.

You've got the power of prayer and what sounds like a strong marriage both working for you. That combination will serve both of you well in the days to come. I hope things go well for your surgery, and will remember you in my own prayers.

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If we all woke up from surgery skinny, fit from workouts, without sagging skin and without the need for Vitamins and life long check ups, then yes, I could see how wls could be considered an easy way out.

We all have to endure surgery, recovery, possible complications, liquid diets, learning what we can eat, exercise, track all food and liquids, cut back on social drinking, possible endure corrective surgery and recovery and finally maintain all that we accomplished, with the work WE did.

So yeah, go ahead, call us lazy. We are saving money, since we can cut back on meds. We did this so we can be productive members of society, instead of couch potatoes. We can take care of our elderly family members etc.

I'm proud that I had the courage to have this surgery. I still don't tell everyone I know about it, since it's my personal medical desicion. If someone asks or is thinking about having the surgery, I will be happy to explain and tell my story. My obese friends know about it, because they might benefit from seeing me do it. The skinny people in my life don't need the info, so why should I tell them?

I don't agree that it is my obligation to educate people, just because they are curious.

My friend was born transgender and she told me that she was having corrective surgery and started living as her tru self. I don't need to know the specifics or see the results of her surgery. I'm simply happy for her that she is now able to be herself and I can see the huge improvement in her everyday life.

Nilla

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Something struck me watching My 600 Pound Life with my BF last night. He and I have been dating a little over 6 months. He never knew me pre-op. He never saw me fat. He has only seen me at my goal weight. He watched me complete a marathon back in September. This is the only me he knows.

He knows I had WLS and he sees the way I have to eat now. He teases me about it, jokes about it, and is sometimes just genuinely baffled by it. He also sees how much exercise I do to maintain my weight. Anyway, watching the show last night, he was still sooooo full of contempt for the featured patient. He made several negative comments that were pretty offensive to me about the way she looked and what she was eating pre-op. Then post-op, when she was struggling to eat 4 teaspoons of Soup, he was shocked about how difficult her recovery was.

It occurred to me that I have seen this kind of reaction and thought process from a LOT of people who think WLS is the "easy way out". They say it's cheating and it's easy, but when confronted with how difficult the recovery is and how little food people can eat post-op, they have this "how/why would you do that to yourself" kind of response. It seems rather hypocritical, but very common.

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Now that I think about it, I was taking the easy way out by controlling my high blood pressure with medication. Now I have done it the hard way by losing weight. Excellent.

I was thinking the same thing! Heart disease is influenced by lifestyle as well. But I don't see nearly the shame people with obesity face. And certainly much more empathy.

Sent from my SM-G900T using the BariatricPal App

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@@LittleBill

Yes we do have a solid marriage and great relationship with each other and Jesus! And I know surgery is the roght thing now.

Thanks for your kids words... Mrs LittleBill is a lucky woman! She must be very proud of you (now)!

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