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Anyone have an issue progressing their diet



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I was sleeved in. August and still not able to eat anything but liquid. Surgeon going to scope me with a ballon to widen my sleeve at the narrow spot. Anyone have this done? If so did it resolve the issue. It appears from Upper GI that scar tissue has built up in that location in the sleeve.

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It is a little common for individuals to develop a stricture after weight loss surgery. Generally this condition is treated by endoscopic dilation. Also be aware that some patients will require this procedure a few times.

According to the internet:

Formation of stricture is another potential complication occurring after LSG [Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy]. It could present either acutely after surgery due to tissue edema or more commonly in a delayed fashion. Presenting symptoms include food intolerance, dysphagia or nausea and vomiting. Although kinking of the stomach following LSG has been reported, the most common site of stenosis is at the incisura angularis. An upper gastrointestinal study or endoscopy is usually diagnostic.

Treatment options depend on the time of presentation. A stricture diagnosed acutely after surgery can sometimes be treated conservatively with bowel rest (nothing by mouth), rehydration with intravenous fluids and close observation. In the absence of other pathologies (e.g., abscess, leak), these strictures will spontaneously resolve with no need for further intervention. Failure of conservative management warrants endoscopic dilation.

In contrast, chronic strictures usually require further intervention. These include either endoscopic or surgical treatments. Treatment options depend on the length of stenosis. Endoscopic dilatation is an invaluable tool used in this setting of a short segment stenosis. Successive treatments in 4- to 6-week intervals are adequate to treat stricture and ameliorate patient symptoms. In contrast, long segment stenosis and failure of endoscopic management demands a surgical intervention. Options include laparoscopic or open seromyotomy or conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Dapri and colleagues26reported their experience with laparoscopic seromyotomy in patients who had LSG. These investigators reported successful results with this treatment. Parikh and colleagues reported an incidence of 3.5% of symptomatic stenosis following LSG in their series of 230 patients; 2 patients required conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass owing to failure of endoscopic management.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3788014/

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And Diane I am an RnY having an EGD for possible(I feel probable) stricture. I am a little less pist-surgery mine was September 5th but I have been on the liquid Bandwagon with you. And all my Surgery Day buddies are progressing way ahead of ME!😭

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Frustr8, I hear you. I was starting to regret this whole process, I’m praying this procedure will resolve my issue without further complications. I hope things go well for you too. I’ll keep you posted.

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And I'll keep you posted too, keep trying to tell myself this is just a Minor Blip, but when it's you it feels pretty majoe!

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