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Tiffykins

LAP-BAND Patients
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  1. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from cyberdiva in Sushi   
    I eat sushi several times a month. I do not eat the raw version of the fish, but I do eat sushi rolls.

    It depends on what kind of rolls I choose. If it's just the veggie rolls with carrots, cucumber, avocado and cream cheese, I can eat about 4 small pieces. If the rolls are the "fried" version with crab meat and some veggies, I can typically only get in 2-3 pieces. I have to eat super slow, like 30-40 minutes to get those in.

    We go out for Hibachi once or twice a month, and we split a fried crab sushi roll, and then we get the shared order of filet mignon/chicken/fried rices/veggies. I eat the sushi pieces wait while the Hibachi guy is doing his little show then I sip some plum wine, and I eat a few bites of steak/chicken, watch a little more of the show, and then eat some fried rice. It's one of the few occasions when I sip while eating. This dining experience lasts nearly 2 hours and that is the only possible way I can get in that much food.
  2. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from JoanneLaRusch in Almost at 1 month... only lost 20 lbs!   
    Seriously, 20lbs per month is phenomenal. When in the past have you dropped 20lbs in a month, and know you're gonna be able to keep it off? That's how I always looked at losing when I was worried about "losing too slow, or too fast". Just keep following the program, push fluids, and you'll continue to succeed.
  3. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from Dogmom68 in Before And After Gastric Sleeve Surgery Photos   
    I'm sorry it took so long for me to reply. I didn't get a notification that you had quoted a post of mine.
    All I did was low carb (less then 30-40gr per day), at least 60gr of Protein and pushed clear fluids until I hit goal.
    I had a lot to lose so it seems like I might have lost more than others, but I lost all of my excess weight (by the BMI chart standards) in around 7-8 months. I was at my and my surgeon's goal in 6.5 months with 115lbs lost.
    It's just what worked for me. I just didn't mess around with carbs, ate 4 meals a day, no snacking, no b.s. Each meal consisted of a minimum of 15gr of Protein.
    The people that lose less pounds in 6 months might not have as much to lose as I did, or they make have the same post-op guideline. Maybe they're not willing to low carb it. The fastest results I've seen across the board is staying in ketosis by eating low carb, pushing clear fluids. I also have no metabolic issues, or co-morbidities that could effect my weight loss numbers. I never used hormonal birth control. So, I really just pushed protein, and worked out after I hit 4 months post-op. Then I did weight lifting exercises and 1 days of cardio, that only lasted for 4 months until I had to have my gallbladder removed and was put on restricted activity because my surgeon removed hoards of scar tissue and adhesions from my abdominal cavity from all the surgeries I've had.
  4. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from ThisRoxx in Pre Op Day 4: Small Cheats...   
    I always cringe when I read these super strict pre-op diet. I didn't have to endure all of that, and only imagine how difficult it must be. Hang in there, and maybe more Water will help curb some of the hunger during those really tough hours.

    We're here for you, and will listen and support you through this and your surgery.
  5. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from dennylg in What happens to the staples?   
    Titanium staples and other surgical implants are the most common and most tolerated world wide.

    The stomach tissue heals completely around the staples and they are not visible. I've flown, and been scanned with military grade metal detectors several times without every setting any of them off. I also have 2 titanium large screws in my left knee that have been in there for the last 17 years without issue.

    Suturing tissue can not give the same closure, and seamless healing process that stapling gives. Plus, there are usually three tiny rows of staples in the stapler that are shot simultaneously into the tissue.

    My dad has had knee surgeries, pins, and other titanium implants for decades upon decades without issue.

    I actually post pictures of the inside of my sleeve. If you aren't squeamish, check out youtube.com for the actual surgery videos. If you'd like I can share my pictures with you so you can see what a sleeve looks like at 8 months out. I had my gallbladder removed at 8 months post-op, and my surgeon decided to scope me at the same time.
  6. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from Losing the old Harley in Long term VSG Diet   
    The losing stage diet is pretty much dead on to what I did to lose my weight with the exception of low fat guideline.
    Maintenance, yeah that's a big fat NO. I continued to drop weight on 1000-1200 calories, limited carbs. My body needed a minimum of 1500 calories, and preferably 1800 calories a day to stop losing. Even at almost 22 months, if I slip below 1500 calories, cut my carb intake, I drop weight. I'm not talking 1-2lbs a week, I'll talking like 5-7lbs a week. Maintenance is tricky for a lot of people, and it really takes a lot of tweaking to figure out what works for each individual. And, I'm fairly sure that I consume more fat grams than this recommends. Going low fat/fat free introduces tons more carbs, sodium, and sugar.
    I think it's a great guideline, but it's definitely not a "one size fits all" plan. I'm just sharing my experience so others are not discouraged if they have to adhere to a different guideline.
  7. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from The 56 Bypass in Worried about getting too thin?   
    When I kept dropping weight I added a few healthy fatty foods and 100% juice to my daily intake. I drank grape juice on a daily basis, and would eat 2-3 avocados per week. I tanked up on Peanut Butter, and started eating white carbs(not in huge quantities, mainly potatoes, and tortillas). It's honestly the only way I've been able to maintain. If I cut these foods out, I lose weight again. Have you had any labs pulled lately, especially a full thyroid panel? I know when I saw my surgeon at my 12 yr f/u he was concerned that was struggling to maintain, and still losing. Of course, my labs were perfect, but my thyroid levels had changed from what they were pre-op. But, maybe getting some labs pulled would be a good place to start.
  8. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from Shimmy in Sleeve vs. Gastric Bypass   
    Is there a military hospital that you can go to and get the sleeve if that is the surgery you really want. I refused RNY/bypass when I had to revise from the band and I listed the reasons below. I've also included the basic information about both surgeries. There are many reasons why I chose VSG instead of RNY, and my VSG was covered at a military hospital 100%.
    I would recommend checking out the obesityhelp.com website, look under surgical forums, check out the Revision forum so you can see how many people are looking to revise from RNY because of weight regain or complications, and then check out the failed weight loss surgery forum just so you can get an idea of people that are further out.
    Here are my reasons for getting VSG instead of RNY:
    The Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy procedure (also called Sleeve Gastrectomy, Vertical Gastrectomy, Greater Curvature Gastrectomy, Parietal Gastrectomy, Gastric Reduction, Logitudinal Gastrectomy and even Vertical Gastroplasty) is performed by approximately 20 surgeons worldwide. This forum is titled “VSG forum” to include the two most common terms for the procedure (vertical and sleeve). The earliest forms of this procedure were conceived of by Dr. Jamieson in Australia (Long Vertical Gastroplasty, Obesity Surgery 1993)- and by Dr. Johnston in England in 1996 (Magenstrasse and Mill operation- Obesity Surgery 2003). Dr Gagner in New York, refined the operation to include gastrectomy(removal of stomach) and offered it to high risk patients in 2001. Several surgeons worldwide have adopted the procedure and have offered it to low BMI and low risk patients as an alternative to laparoscopic banding of the stomach.
    It generates weight loss by restricting the amount of food (and therefore calories) that can be eaten by removing 85% or more of the stomach without bypassing the intestines or causing any gastrointestinal malabsorption. It is a purely restrictive operation. It is currently indicated as an alternative to the Lap-Band® procedure for low weight individuals and as a safe option for higher weight individuals.

    Anatomy
    This procedure generates weight loss solely through gastric restriction (reduced stomach volume). The stomach is restricted by stapling and dividing it vertically and removing more than 85% of it. This part of the procedure is not reversible. The stomach that remains is shaped like a very slim banana and measures from 1-5 ounces (30-150cc), depending on the surgeon performing the procedure. The nerves to the stomach and the outlet valve (pylorus) remain intact with the idea of preserving the functions of the stomach while drastically reducing the volume. By comparison, in a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the stomach is divided, not removed, and the pylorus is excluded. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass stomach can be reconnected (reversed) if necessary. Note that there is no intestinal bypass with this procedure, only stomach reduction. The lack of an intestinal bypass avoids potentially costly, long term complications such as marginal ulcers, Vitamin deficiencies and intestinal obstructions.
    Comparison to prior Gastroplasties (stomach stapling of the 70-80s)
    The Vertical Gastrectomy is a significant improvement over prior gastroplasty procedures for a number of reasons:
    1) Rather than creating a pouch with silastic rings or polypropylene mesh, the VG actually resects or removes the majority of the stomach. The portion of the stomach which is removed is responsible for secreting Ghrelin, which is a hormone that is responsible for appetite and hunger. By removing this portion of the stomach rather than leaving it in-place, the level of Ghrelin is reduced to near zero, actually causing loss of or a reduction in appetite (Obesity Surgery, 15, 1024-1029, 2005). Currently, it is not known if Ghrelin levels increase again after one to two years. Patients do report that some hunger and cravings do slowly return. An excellent study by Dr. Himpens in Belgium(Obesity Surgery 2006) demonstrated that the cravings in a VSG patient 3 years after surgery are much less than in LapBand patients and this probably accounts for the superior weight loss.
    2) The removed section of the stomach is actually the portion that “stretches” the most. The long vertical tube shaped stomach that remains is the portion least likely to expand over time and it creates significant resistance to volumes of food. Remember, resistance is greatest the smaller the diameter and the longer the channel. Not only is appetite reduced, but very small amounts of food generate early and lasting satiety(fullness).
    3) Finally, by not having silastic rings or mesh wrapped around the stomach, the problems which are associated with these items are eliminated (infection, obstruction, erosion, and the need for synthetic materials). An additional discussion based on choice of procedures is below.
    Alternative to a Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass
    The Vertical Gastrectomy is a reasonable alternative to a Roux en Y Gastric Bypass for a number of reasons

    Because there is no intestinal bypass, the risk of malabsorptive complications such as vitamin deficiency and Protein deficiency is minimal. There is no risk of marginal ulcer which occurs in over 2% of Roux en Y Gastric Bypass patients. The pylorus is preserved so dumping syndrome does not occur or is minimal. There is no intestinal obstruction since there is no intestinal bypass. It is relatively easy to modify to an alternative procedure should weight loss be inadequate or weight regain occur. The limited two year and 6 year weight loss data available to date is superior to current Banding and comparable to Gastric Bypass weight loss data(see Lee, Jossart, Cirangle Surgical Endoscopy 2007). First stage of a Duodenal Switch
    In 2001, Dr. Gagner performed the VSG laparoscopically in a group of very high BMI patients to try to reduce the overall risk of weight loss surgery. This was considered the ‘first stage’ of the Duodenal Switch procedure. Once a patient’s BMI goes above 60kg/m2, it is increasingly difficult to safely perform a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or a Duodenal Switch using the laparoscopic approach. Morbidly obese patients who undergo the laparoscopic approach do better overall in their recovery, while minimizing pain and wound complications, when compared to patients who undergo large, open incisions for surgery (Annals of Surgery, 234 (3): pp 279-291, 2001). In addition, the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass tends to yield inadequate weight loss for patients with a BMI greater than 55kg/m2 (Annals of Surgery, 231(4): pp 524-528. The Duodenal Switch is very effective for high BMI patients but unfortunately it can also be quite risky and may be safer if done open in these patients. The solution was to ‘stage’ the procedure for the high BMI patients.
    The VSG is a reasonable solution to this problem. It can usually be done laparoscopically even in patients weighing over 500 pounds. The stomach restriction that occurs allows these patients to lose more than 100 pounds. This dramatic weight loss allows significant improvement in health and resolution of associated medical problems such as diabetes and sleep apnea, and therefore effectively “downstages” a patient to a lower risk group. Once the patients BMI is lower (35-40) they can return to the operating room for the “second stage” of the procedure, which can either be the Duodenal Switch, Roux–en-Y gastric bypass or even a Lap-Band®. Current, but limited, data for this ‘two stage’ approach indicate adequate weight loss and fewer complications.
    Vertical Gastrectomy as an only stage procedure for Low BMI patients(alternative to Lap-Band®and Gastric Bypass)
    The Vertical Gastrectomy has proven to be quite safe and quite effective for individuals with a BMI in lower ranges. The following points are based on review of existing reports:
    Dr. Johnston in England, 10% of his patients did fail to achieve a BMI below 35 at 5 years and these tended to be the heavier individuals. The same ones we would expect to go through a second stage as noted above. The lower BMI patients had good weight loss (Obesity Surgery 2003).
    In San Francisco, Dr Lee, Jossart and Cirangle initiated this procedure for high risk and high BMI patients in 2002. The results have been very impressive. In more than 700 patients, there were no deaths, no conversions to open and a leak rate of less than 1%. The two year weight loss results are similar to the Roux en Y Gastric Bypass and the Duodenal Switch (81-86% Excess Weight Loss). Results comparing the first 216 patients are published in Surgical Endoscopy.. Earlier results were also presented at the American College of Surgeons National Meeting at a Plenary Session in October 2004 and can be found here: www.facs.org/education/gs2004/gs33lee.pdf.
    Dr Himpens and colleagues in Brussels have published 3 year results comparing 40 Lap-Band® patients to 40 Laparoscopic VSG patients. The VSG patients had a superior excess weight loss of 57% compared to 41% for the Lap-Band® group (Obesity Surgery, 16, 1450-1456, 2006).
    Low BMI individuals who should consider this procedure include:

    Those who are concerned about the potential long term side effects of an intestinal bypass such as intestinal obstruction, ulcers, anemia, osteoporosis, Protein deficiency and vitamin deficiency. Those who are considering a Lap-Band® but are concerned about a foreign body or worried about frequent adjustments or finding a band adjustment physician. Those who have other medical problems that prevent them from having weight loss surgery such as anemia, Crohn’s disease, extensive prior surgery, severe asthma requiring frequent steroid use, and other complex medical conditions. People who need to take anti-inflammatory medications may also want to consider the Vertical Gastrectomy. Unlike the gastric bypass where these medications are associated with a very high incidence of ulcer, the VSG does not seem to have the same issues. Also, Lap-Band ® patients are at higher risks for complications from NSAID use. All surgical weight loss procedures have certain risks, complications and benefits. The ultimate result from weight loss surgery is dependent on the patients risk, how much education they receive from their surgeon, commitment to diet, establishing an exercise routine and the surgeons experience. As Dr. Jamieson summarized in 1993, “Given good motivation, a good operation technique and good education, patients can achieve weight loss comparable to that from more invasive procedures.”
    Next: Advantages and Disadvantages of Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy >>
    This information has been provided courtesy of Laparoscopic Associates of San Francisco (LAPSF). Please visit the Laparoscopic Associates of San Francisco.
    Advantages and Disadvantages of Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy
    Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy Advantages

    Reduces stomach capacity but tends to allow the stomach to function normally so most food items can be consumed, albeit in small amounts. Eliminates the portion of the stomach that produces the hormones that stimulates hunger (Ghrelin). Dumping syndrome is avoided or minimized because the pylorus is preserved. Minimizes the chance of an ulcer occurring. By avoiding the intestinal bypass, almost eliminates the chance of intestinal obstruction (blockage), marginal ulcers, anemia, osteoporosis, protein deficiency and vitamin deficiency. Very effective as a first stage procedure for high BMI patients (BMI > 55 kg/m2). Limited results appear promising as a single stage procedure for low BMI patients (BMI 30-50 kg/m2). Appealing option for people who are concerned about the complications of intestinal bypass procedures or who have existing anemia, Crohn’s disease and numerous other conditions that make them too high risk for intestinal bypass procedures. Appealing option for people who are concerned about the foreign body aspect of Banding procedures. Can be done laparoscopically in patients weighing over 500 pounds, thereby providing all the advantages of minimally invasive surgery: fewer wound and lung problems, less pain, and faster recovery. Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy Disadvantages

    Potential for inadequate weight loss or weight regain. While this is true for all procedures, it is theoretically more possible with procedures that do not have an intestinal bypass. Higher BMI patients will most likely need to have a second stage procedure later to help lose the rest of the weight. Remember, two stages may ultimately be safer and more effective than one operation for high BMI patients. This is an active point of discussion for bariatric surgeons. Soft calories such as ice cream, milk shakes, etc can be absorbed and may slow weight loss. This procedure does involve stomach stapling and therefore leaks and other complications related to stapling may occur. Because the stomach is removed, it is not reversible. It can be converted to almost any other weight loss procedure. Considered investigational by some surgeons and insurance companies. Next: >> Frequently Asked Questions About Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy
    This information has been provided courtesy of Laparoscopic Associates of San Francisco (LAPSF). Please visit the Laparoscopic Associates of San Francisco.
    Bypass information
  9. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from dennylg in What happens to the staples?   
    Titanium staples and other surgical implants are the most common and most tolerated world wide.

    The stomach tissue heals completely around the staples and they are not visible. I've flown, and been scanned with military grade metal detectors several times without every setting any of them off. I also have 2 titanium large screws in my left knee that have been in there for the last 17 years without issue.

    Suturing tissue can not give the same closure, and seamless healing process that stapling gives. Plus, there are usually three tiny rows of staples in the stapler that are shot simultaneously into the tissue.

    My dad has had knee surgeries, pins, and other titanium implants for decades upon decades without issue.

    I actually post pictures of the inside of my sleeve. If you aren't squeamish, check out youtube.com for the actual surgery videos. If you'd like I can share my pictures with you so you can see what a sleeve looks like at 8 months out. I had my gallbladder removed at 8 months post-op, and my surgeon decided to scope me at the same time.
  10. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from Mgomez31 in What Vitamins Do You Take And For How Long?   
    I take a multi with Iron (once daily right now because I'm taking a RX prenatal since I'm pregnant)1
    1 2500mcg B12 sublingual 4-5 days a week
    calcium citrate chewables by Celebrate Vitamins -2 chewables per day 500mg per chewable
    I've taken this regimen for 18 months apart from the prenatal. In my last pregnancy, I stayed on Celebrate Complete Multi- 2 chewables per day.
    It's actually no more than what any other woman in my age group should take on a daily basis apart from the b12.
  11. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from cedybug in Did anyone get their hair back?   
    What about your thyroid? Are you on any specific medications that could hinder hair growth?

    You can check with your pharmacist to see if there is anything you're taking that could cause these symptoms.
  12. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from njgal in NSV shout outs   
    This is probably going to seem sooooooooo trivial to everyone else, but I had a great NSV last night.

    John and I have never been cuddly when we sleep. #1 I would get so hot that I couldn't stand having him right up on me #2 He's a tummy sleeper with his elbows spread out over the bed, I sleep on my side with a body pillow.

    Anyways, last night, he pulls me in super close to his chest, my back is touching his chest, and he wraps his arms around me, like completely around me (that's never happened before), and he nuzzled his head next to my neck and was asleep in a matter of minutes. I laid there just smiling like a goofy kid at a candy store, and I could feel his heart beating on my back. I laid there and actually felt his heart rate slow down as he began to drift off into a deep sleep. It felt so amazing to be that close, and not be hot and feel gross about myself. He had one arm under my head, wrap it up over me and the other arm wrapped around me the other side. I don't think I've ever realized how many "little" things we didn't do because of my weight.

    He then started snoring (which he never did before), and I had to move a little because he was right next to my ear. But for the first time in 3.5 years, I literally fell asleep in my love's arms.
  13. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from dennylg in What happens to the staples?   
    Titanium staples and other surgical implants are the most common and most tolerated world wide.

    The stomach tissue heals completely around the staples and they are not visible. I've flown, and been scanned with military grade metal detectors several times without every setting any of them off. I also have 2 titanium large screws in my left knee that have been in there for the last 17 years without issue.

    Suturing tissue can not give the same closure, and seamless healing process that stapling gives. Plus, there are usually three tiny rows of staples in the stapler that are shot simultaneously into the tissue.

    My dad has had knee surgeries, pins, and other titanium implants for decades upon decades without issue.

    I actually post pictures of the inside of my sleeve. If you aren't squeamish, check out youtube.com for the actual surgery videos. If you'd like I can share my pictures with you so you can see what a sleeve looks like at 8 months out. I had my gallbladder removed at 8 months post-op, and my surgeon decided to scope me at the same time.
  14. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from Honeypenny in Stomach growling??   
    It sounds like what happened when I started having acid issues. It never got to full blown reflux, but I was getting this gnawing twinge an hour or so after I'd eat. I was totally full, but after talking to other veterans, they told me to talk to my surgeon about getting on a PPI before the reflux really started. Low and behold, I went on Prilosec and about a week and half later that twinge was gone along with my hunger. For me, it started about the same time as yours, right around 6 weeks out and I had started on more mushy, dense foods.
    I haven't felt it since then, and I continue to take my Prilosec every morning like clockwork. I could wean off of it, but honestly I don't want to deal with hunger, or breakthrough reflux that others discuss when they wean off their PPI.
  15. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from NYCGAL000 in Drinking alcohol after VSG   
    I was cleared for wine consumption at 3.5 months out. My surgeon warned me to steer clear of red wines. I didn't drink until I was at goal, I was pretty carb/calorie conscious and didn't want to waste my calories on alcohol.
    The first time I drank a glass of Riesling, it hit me hard and fast then I sobered up pretty quickly. I am that "party girl", and have been socially drinking for the last ummmm few months. I tie one on monthly with mixed drinks and shots, and my tolerance is the same as it was pre-op now. In my little social circle of military wives, I'm know as the "afternoon cocktail" girl, and have been known to drink a strawberry mojito, have a glass of wine, or even a rum/coke at lunch. I don't drink at home, and I typically keep my drinking to a 4-6 times a month kind of thing, and it's typically just one drink unless it's my monthly "girls night out".
    I'm below goal, and the only thing I do notice is that I retain Water like the hoover dam after a big night out. Other than that, I have zero ill effects from drinking with my sleeve. I refuse to give up anything forever that includes any type of food or beverage. I had surgery to be as close to normal as possible, and being a social drinker is part of my "normal".
  16. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from Lainybee1987 in How to eat at McDonald's after the sleeve....   
    Y'all don't even wanna know what I eat in maintenance HA, and I'm able to maintain my weight loss without suffering mentally or physically from eating out. For all of the judgmental, finger-wagging replies, I am living proof that eating "off plan" and NOT dieting works wonderfully in maintenance. There is a vast difference in eating junk food daily, or over-indulging in hot fudge sundaes or choosing to have a grilled chicken breast wrap from McDonalds.
    I eat out on average 3-4 days a week. And, those on the forum who are on my Facebook can all confirm that information.
    I make the best choice 85% of the time, the other 15% I have half of a chili cheese coney with 6-8 cheesy tots from Sonic, or a fully loaded double cheeseburger minus the bun with EXTRA big mac sauce and pickles.
    Today, I'm going to Moe's for $6 burrito Monday. I'll skip the rice, get double pinto Beans, chicken, salsa, sour cream and guacamole. I might 3-4 bites of the tortilla, or have a few of the chips with salsa.
    By no means am I encouraging anyone to eat the bad stuff, but for me, my goals, my mental healthy, I can not and will not diet nor look at foods as BAD. There are foods that are nutrient dense, and others that are nutrient lacking. I choose the first option the majority of the time. This gives me the balance that I need to be successful not only at keeping my weight off, but to keep my mind healthy as well. I deprivation dieted myself up to 270lbs, and like I've said for over a year now, mashed potatoes and Pasta didn't make me fat. Eating 2-3 cups of those foods along with the main meat course, puls a fried appetizer, 2-3 glasses of sweet tea, and a dessert made me fat.
  17. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from njgal in NSV shout outs   
    I scored a $50.00 Gap card for just $25 so I ventured into the store apprehensive that I'd find anything that looked good on me.

    After trying on 12 pairs, yes you read that right 12 pairs of jeans, I found a "cut/style" that fit perfectly. The sales clerk said "here try these on, those other ones you've picked out are huge, and you're so tiny you will fit in these" She handed me what looked like a tiny size.

    The best part is they are a size 25(European)/Size 0 YES, a size zero, me in a size 0 Gap jeans? Someone pinch me because I must be dreaming ! ! !They are the "boyfriend" cut which are a little bigger in the waist than the other styles, but the size 2's in all their other styles were too big in the butt and thighs ! ! !
    Well, the size 2 were too big, and the 0's fit like a glove.

    Seriously, what an amazing feeling.


  18. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from njgal in NSV shout outs   
    NSVs are hard to come by these days for me, but yesterday it happened.

    I did 4 hours of yard work. We have about 1.5 acres, and it's been over 3 weeks since we were able to mow (damn rainy weekends in Florida). Anyways, I mowed, trimmed hedges, trimmed our large tree in the front yard, and cleaned out the mulch so I could replace it this year.

    We have a riding lawn mower and it only takes me about 1.5 hours to mow so that was a breeze. But, all the other stuff was pretty intense. The tree I trimmed was a boogar, and then I drug all the big branches into the bon fire pile. Some of those branches were 4-6 inches in diameter & some of them were about 8-9 feet long, and I trimmed them with a hand saw. The tree was growing into some power lines, and it had to be trimmed before the power company gave us notice.

    I raked the front yard, and cleaned up all the mulch. The husband got home, and was shocked that I was able to get so much done. He thought I had paid someone to come do everything. I just laughed at him, and told him that I did it all.

    NSV came when I realized that I was not dying from exhaustion, I wasn't sore from all of the work, and I felt so good that I showered, and went to John's softball game. Pre-op I would have never done all of that without taking several breaks, and being absolutely worn out. I didn't stop for those 4 hours, and was hellbent on getting it all done.
  19. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from njgal in NSV shout outs   
    Bill - that NSV is awesome ! ! !

    Carolyn - that is exactly what I was thinking when I posted that one. It's not always the numbers on the scale. It's the little victories that feel the best. It's realizing something that never happened before, and thinking "wow, I can actually do that now."
  20. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from njgal in NSV shout outs   
    Okay this one is seriously ridiculous, but I found it to be pretty awesome.

    I have been super emotional, and pretty irritable lately. This weekend, I decided to take a bubble bath in our garden tub. I never take baths. I'm a shower girl all the way, but I thought a hot bath would relax me.

    While I was soaking, I decided to sink below the Water, head and all. Then I noticed I was starting to float. I couldn't get myself to just lay in the Water without floating to the top. I could never float in the tub before because I could never displace enough water to get my big butt to float. But, I totally floated right up to the top of the water. I called John in there laughing. He thought I had fallen, I was laughing so hard.

    I know it's not anything super exciting, but it made me giggle, and realize that I can now displace enough water to float in the tub ! ! !
  21. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from njgal in NSV shout outs   
    It's been a couple of weeks since anyone posted any new NSV's so I wanted to bump this thread, and see how everyone is doing.


    I have one, it isn't very exciting, but I thought I would share.

    While John and I were in WV, we attended a WV University football game in Morgantown, WV. It's been John's dream to attend a game up there, and I got box tickets for 50 bucks for the biggest rival game of the season. We decided to rent a hotel room, and stay the night up there. The college is 3 hours from his folks place.

    Anyways, we knew parking would be a nightmare. The hotel desk attendant told us it was only a 10-15 minute walk to the stadium.

    We thought it would be a nice little walk, and give us a chance to see stuff around the area. Come to find out, it was a 4 mile trek up and down hills to get to the stadium.

    BUT, I walked it like a champ. It did only take us about 20 minutes, but I have short legs so I don't walk fast. I'll throw out there that it was also 29 degrees out, and my knees NEVER hurt, ached, or throbbed ( I would of never been able to make it pre-surgery). I told John we were going to get a taxi for the way back. But, at the end of the game, we sucked it up, and walked back. The temperature had dropped, and the wind was whipping around at about 15mph, but we managed.

    My hamstrings were a bit tight the next morning, but I don't if that was from the walk or the after the game celebatory lovin':001_tt2: I got at the hotel ! ! ! WVU won, and so did I.
  22. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from njgal in NSV shout outs   
    Ha ha Steph, I almost took a picture with my phone but the light from the window in my bathroom it wasn't coming out right.

    It cracked me up that I stood there glaring at my crotch in all different positions just to make sure I wasn't imagining it.
  23. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from njgal in NSV shout outs   
    This is probably going to seem sooooooooo trivial to everyone else, but I had a great NSV last night.

    John and I have never been cuddly when we sleep. #1 I would get so hot that I couldn't stand having him right up on me #2 He's a tummy sleeper with his elbows spread out over the bed, I sleep on my side with a body pillow.

    Anyways, last night, he pulls me in super close to his chest, my back is touching his chest, and he wraps his arms around me, like completely around me (that's never happened before), and he nuzzled his head next to my neck and was asleep in a matter of minutes. I laid there just smiling like a goofy kid at a candy store, and I could feel his heart beating on my back. I laid there and actually felt his heart rate slow down as he began to drift off into a deep sleep. It felt so amazing to be that close, and not be hot and feel gross about myself. He had one arm under my head, wrap it up over me and the other arm wrapped around me the other side. I don't think I've ever realized how many "little" things we didn't do because of my weight.

    He then started snoring (which he never did before), and I had to move a little because he was right next to my ear. But for the first time in 3.5 years, I literally fell asleep in my love's arms.
  24. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from cyberdiva in Sushi   
    I eat sushi several times a month. I do not eat the raw version of the fish, but I do eat sushi rolls.

    It depends on what kind of rolls I choose. If it's just the veggie rolls with carrots, cucumber, avocado and cream cheese, I can eat about 4 small pieces. If the rolls are the "fried" version with crab meat and some veggies, I can typically only get in 2-3 pieces. I have to eat super slow, like 30-40 minutes to get those in.

    We go out for Hibachi once or twice a month, and we split a fried crab sushi roll, and then we get the shared order of filet mignon/chicken/fried rices/veggies. I eat the sushi pieces wait while the Hibachi guy is doing his little show then I sip some plum wine, and I eat a few bites of steak/chicken, watch a little more of the show, and then eat some fried rice. It's one of the few occasions when I sip while eating. This dining experience lasts nearly 2 hours and that is the only possible way I can get in that much food.
  25. Like
    Tiffykins got a reaction from sweesee in Do I need Botox   
    It's not stupid. I'm 34, and will be having fillers and botox done. I've had 2 consults and Juvederm was mentioned for my laugh lines, and botox for my 11 lines (in between the eyebrows) and deep forehead wrinkles. I'm not sure if I'm willing to have her botox my crow's feet because I don't want "concrete face".
    As for the turkey neck, I was able to avoid that one. I've been using Garnier gravity defying moisturizer for over a year now, and I see a noticeable difference in my neck when I skip that area.
    I've also looked into a mini-facelift, but my derm thinks that's a little extreme at this stage. I can say that my face has changed several times even in maintenance. Fat redistributes, skin changes, and then BAM a new wrinkle appears. I'm trying to wait until I'm close to 2 years out before doing anything to my face.
    Boobs and Tummy Tuck are on hold as well because once again, my body shape has changed, and skin is rebounding.
    Have you ever looked into Lifestyle Lift? ?? It's supposed to be less expensive than a full face lift? ? ?

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