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McButterpants

Gastric Sleeve Patients
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  1. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Andrea Guadiana in A days diet after VSG- Can anyone give examples?   
    I'm at 12 weeks right now - here's a typical day for me:
    Breakfast -
    Jimmy Dean turkey sausage patty
    scrambled egg topped w/ shredded cheese
    snack -
    powders?utm_source=BariatricPal&utm_medium=Affiliate&utm_campaign=CommentLink" target="_ad" data-id="1" >unjury Protein shake w/ 1/4 cup berries
    lunch -
    4 slices of lunch meat (1 1/2 to 2 ounces) wrapped w/ sharp cheddar cheese (1/2 to 1 ounce)
    Snack -
    Unjury Protein Shake
    dinner -
    2-3 ounces of chicken or beef
    a few bites of cooked broccoli
    Snack -
    Health Wise hot chocolate
  2. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Amburmist in What's the story behind your profile name?   
    My hooker name is: Pepper St. John
  3. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from ratcat2 in Weird comments, and how to respond!   
    My reply would have been something along the lines of..."He's kind of struggling now, he is a chubby chaser!"
    In all seriousness, where do people come up with this stuff? "Your husband must love it!" Like you were unloveable, unattractive, unworthy of attention...Ugh!
  4. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Kaddy in What are you eating 8 weeks out?   
    I think so - The Protein is important so you don't lose lean muscle mass. Lean muscle mass is what burns calories and keeps your metabolism rev'd up.
    Sometimes the thought of drinking another shake makes me want to run myself over with my own car. But, I look at it as medicine - medicine my body needs to keep working.
  5. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from anewme17 in Biotin for hair loss?   
    hair loss here, too...it sucks.
    My doc approved use of Biotin and Folic Acid. She isn't convinced that there is anything that will stop Hair loss, but didn't discourage me from trying. I also use Nioxin Shampoo.
    I started losing my hair at 2 months and I'll be 4 months next week - I'm still losing. I can see some new growth which is encouraging. But I've been losing more in the last few weeks.
    My doc said that anything you lose due to the surgery, will grow back.
  6. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Missy161 in Yeast Infection from Hades   
    I just asked this on another thread...sorry if it's too personal, but...are you having regular bowel movements?
    If you're not, that could be the cause. According to my NUT (and I double checked with another NUT to be sure), that pesky itching could be from not having regular bowel movements.
    Here's an article on candida (yeast infection) and leaky gut syndrome. You can also do a google search for: yeast infection bowel movement and it will provide some good links.
    http://www.yeastinfectionadvisor.com/leakygutsyndrome.html
    I've had two NUT's tell me it's so important to take a good quality probiotic. I use Ther-Biotic Complete powder - it has 100+ Billion CFU's.
    Post op, I thought I was going to have to treat a yeast infection with an over the counter treatment. I called the NUT and told her I hadn't had a bowel movement in 5 days and she freaked a little. I had to take some Metamucil and start the probiotic up again. Once things got moving, that irritating itch went a way.
  7. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Shereseed in Who eats McDonalds post op?   
    I would eat at McDonalds before surgery - not a lot (I'd prefer a good cheeseburger from a great bar here in town).
    Now - I really don't want one. In fact, I was in a McDonalds this afternoon and the greasy smell made me a little sick to my stomach. I didn't order anything and to be quite honest, I didn't want anything.
    I have found that those foods that I used to crave, want, binge on, just don't appeal to me anymore. I used to love bread - good crusty artisan bread. I rarely eat bread now and I don't miss it. The other night at Olive Garden I had 1/2 a breadstick....pre-surgery, I would eat 3-4 breadsticks plus all that Pasta. I used to love pizza - I know will eat the toppings and a couple of bites of the crust.
    I think once I de-toxed my body, I realized all that I didn't want all that processed food anymore. I'm not saying I never eat carbs or bad stuff. I've been known to sneak a fry from my son's plate or a Dorito here and there, but for the most part, I don't want that stuff.
    I know you're worried about what your diet will be like post-op....I did too. I mourned food. I had my food funerals. In reality, I didn't need to. Food just doesn't have it's clutches in me any more - I'm finally free.
  8. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Shereseed in Who eats McDonalds post op?   
    I would eat at McDonalds before surgery - not a lot (I'd prefer a good cheeseburger from a great bar here in town).
    Now - I really don't want one. In fact, I was in a McDonalds this afternoon and the greasy smell made me a little sick to my stomach. I didn't order anything and to be quite honest, I didn't want anything.
    I have found that those foods that I used to crave, want, binge on, just don't appeal to me anymore. I used to love bread - good crusty artisan bread. I rarely eat bread now and I don't miss it. The other night at Olive Garden I had 1/2 a breadstick....pre-surgery, I would eat 3-4 breadsticks plus all that Pasta. I used to love pizza - I know will eat the toppings and a couple of bites of the crust.
    I think once I de-toxed my body, I realized all that I didn't want all that processed food anymore. I'm not saying I never eat carbs or bad stuff. I've been known to sneak a fry from my son's plate or a Dorito here and there, but for the most part, I don't want that stuff.
    I know you're worried about what your diet will be like post-op....I did too. I mourned food. I had my food funerals. In reality, I didn't need to. Food just doesn't have it's clutches in me any more - I'm finally free.
  9. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Odie in Husband rant!   
    So I am going to approach this from a different angle...My weight was never an issue for my husband. He was concerned about my health, but never ever said anything about my weight. He truly loved me when I was at my lowest (the day we met) and loved me at my heaviest (the day I decided to have surgery).
    While he supports me, he's not he rah-rah type of a guy who makes a big deal out of things - I had surgery, I worked hard to lose weight and come to terms with my food addiction. Every once in a while, like every other leap year, he gives me an "I'm proud of you comment" or "I'm glad you had surgery", but it's not like he celebrates every 1/4 pound weight loss with me.
    My husband wrote this for my blog at my 7 week post op mark. Is still brings tears to my eyes now...This helps me sometimes when I think he needs to "be more supportive" - he is supportive, just in his own way.

    From Mr. McButterpants:
    The wife recently asked me to write a little something for her blog. Not much on writing more than witty quips in response to my friends Facebook posts, my first response was a “oh sure” and then to politely ignore the request. It’s a tactic that works I’d say 75% of the time. I was hoping that she would be so excited (or distraught) about weight loss/lack of weight loss/not pooping/pooping/someone else pooping or not pooping, she’d forget that she asked. So a week passed and then I get a, “So I’d really like you to write a post for my blog. You know, from the spouses point of view.” I thought I was home free with her focus on the stall. Guess not.
    My wife’s weight has never really been an issue for me. We met over the phone and had a 3000-mile long distance relationship before the Internet and unlimited phone service. We worked in the same industry and developed a relationship over months of hours-long, bank-account-crushing phone calls. We have always said that if we had come across each other in a bar or other typical meeting place, we wouldn’t have been each other’s type, physically. Since we fell in love before we ever met, we got what we got. Which by the way, I was pretty happy with upon our first meeting. So when she informed me of her thoughts on surgery I tried hard to keep the slack jawed WTF look off my face as much as I could. I initially thought, “Your going to cut out most of your stomach just to lose a few pounds. What?” What I didn’t realize is that it wasn’t a few pounds. Much like your surprise when someone comments on how much your child has grown because they only see him once a year, I hadn’t noticed she had gained a hundred pounds since we first met. She had always just been my wife, my best friend, the person I would spend a long wonderful life with. My attachment to her has always been so much more than physical, and when I look at her I still see that 25-year-old girl I fell in love with. So when she told me how much she weighed I thought, “Holy shit, when did that happen?”
    My blessing of the surgery wasn’t without hesitation. I know what obesity does to a body over time and have witnessed it first hand in my father and mother-in-law. The breaking down of joints, the insulin injections, heart issues and on and on…I know, preaching to the choir. But what if something happens during surgery and I lose the love of my life? What if our boy loses his mother? The mere thoughts made my heart hurt. How would I ever cope if something tragic actually happened? But you can’t live life on the basis that something bad MIGHT happen. Its what kept my mother from fully experiencing life and I always hated that. I wanted to have the healthiest wife possible as we get older. I wanted her to be comfortable in her skin. I wanted her to wear clothes she likes, not just the ones that hide the most. I wanted her to not feel awkward around others. I’ve never really struggled with weight. Sure I could lose more than a few pounds, but it falls off with little effort. I don’t fully understand the angst that the weight causes my wife but I know she isn’t as happy as she could be because of it. Life isn’t a dress rehearsal. You gotta make the most of it. So I agreed, reluctantly.
    After coming to grips with the minimal risk involved and nervously waiting for good news from the operating room, it’s been a pretty easy journey for me. I’ve had to do very little except listen. Listen about the surgery, shakes, stalls, pooping, not pooping and then pooping again. My wife is hard-core about obtaining information off the internet. So much so, she once gave her GP a tutorial on thyroid testing and the latest acceptable ranges for each test, which came as news to her doctor. Still not sure why we had to pay for that office visit. So nothing came as a surprise. It made my life easier knowing that if anything came up post op that might freak me out, she had the stats on how many patients experienced the same thing, why it happened, how long it will likely last, and what the next day, week, month has in store. Easy for me, but I know it hasn’t been easy for her and that each day brings a new challenge. I am so grateful for what she is willing to put herself through for a healthier future with our son and me. Recently she’s been in the dreaded stall, but it’s subsided, and she has a little pep in her step. I love the gleam in her eye when the scale tells her what she wants to hear. I love how she gleefully shows off how crappy her clothes fit. Mostly I love that each day she seems to feel more comfortable in her skin and happier with herself. What more can you really ask for?
  10. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from lelewatson in Kristen's Journey From Pre-Op and Beyond   
    Decaf green tea helped me greatly during the pre-op diet - it helped with hunger. I am not a tea drinker, but it was a lifesaver!
  11. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Kevin326 in Regret at times   
    I think what you're feeling is perfectly normal. There have been times, even newly post-op, where I thought, "What did I do to myself?" Those feelings subsided after the first 6 months or so and at 2.5 years out, I don't have them any more.
    You can always get support here. Your local hospital may have a support group (even if you didn't get surgery there). You are not alone.
    Here's what I know 2.5 years out - my life is so much better. I do not regret this decision at all - there were times when I was having an emotional moment that I wished I could sit down to a big bowl of Pasta and go to town. There were times I wanted to eat an entire baguette of bread. There were times I wanted chocolate cake. But my sleeve was there for me - it didn't allow me to sabotage myself.
    My new normal is splitting a meal with my husband. Eating a hamburger without the bun. I still drink Protein shakes. But, I also allow some treats - a small bowl of ice cream, a cookie, a muffin, etc. But I don't crave them like I used to. I'm OK with my new normal.
    Hang in there, kid. You're going to be on an emotional roller coaster for the foreseeable future. It's going to be hard. Keep your eye on the prize, though. It will be so worth it!
  12. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from VSG-DSG in Staple foods for puree (phase 2)   
    pureed lean meat, poultry or fish (blended w/ low fat cream Soup or broth)
    Blended cottage cheese
    soft scrambled egg (made soft by adding milk or Water before cooking)
    Cream of Wheat or oatmeal (add a scoop of Protein powder)
    Unsweetened strained applesauce
    pureed canned fruit in light juice or water
    pureed COOKED vegetable (squash, green Beans, cauliflower, broccoli)
    fat free/low fat cream soup blended
    blended bean soup
    fat free refried beans
  13. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Cape Cod in Work at Home While Recovering After Surgery   
    I telecommute full time...I had my surgery on Thursday and was back to work 1/2 days the following Monday (I worked a full day on Tuesday). I had an easy recovery with no issues, but got tired very easily. It was nice to know I could work for a few hours, then focus on me and rest or go for a walk. That Tuesday that I worked a full day, tired me out and in retrospect, I should have only worked 1/2 day that day as well. The following week I was back to full time (45+ hours per week) with no issues.
  14. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from VEGAN ME in Just putting it out there, so 'dirty' little secrets may see the light of day!   
    True story about soft drinks unrelated to the confessional part of this thread...When I went to the information session about VSG, the doctor said he had had the VSG surgery. He was sipping on a diet Coke during the seminar when he shows a slide about forbidden foods and it mentioned soft drinks. I thought that was ironic.
  15. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from snugelkin in Kristen's Journey From Pre-Op and Beyond   
    11/3 will be here before you know it.
    I'm 10 months post-op and often refer back to my "decision day" photo. I am so glad I took it - it was the day I decided to have surgery. The day I went to the surgeon's office and cried when I got on the scale. At that moment I thought "this is the worst day of my life", when it was actually the point I decided to change my life. I took lots of pictures of myself along the way - it's funny to go back and re-live the last 10 months thru pictures and see how many body changed, I developed a chin line, my collarbones started to appear, etc.
    I also took my measurements - that helped me during those stalls you keep hearing about. It helped out a lot when the scale wasn't moving, but inches were coming off my body. It saved my sanity on more than a few occasions.
    Best of luck to you!
  16. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Kevin326 in Regret at times   
    I think what you're feeling is perfectly normal. There have been times, even newly post-op, where I thought, "What did I do to myself?" Those feelings subsided after the first 6 months or so and at 2.5 years out, I don't have them any more.
    You can always get support here. Your local hospital may have a support group (even if you didn't get surgery there). You are not alone.
    Here's what I know 2.5 years out - my life is so much better. I do not regret this decision at all - there were times when I was having an emotional moment that I wished I could sit down to a big bowl of Pasta and go to town. There were times I wanted to eat an entire baguette of bread. There were times I wanted chocolate cake. But my sleeve was there for me - it didn't allow me to sabotage myself.
    My new normal is splitting a meal with my husband. Eating a hamburger without the bun. I still drink Protein shakes. But, I also allow some treats - a small bowl of ice cream, a cookie, a muffin, etc. But I don't crave them like I used to. I'm OK with my new normal.
    Hang in there, kid. You're going to be on an emotional roller coaster for the foreseeable future. It's going to be hard. Keep your eye on the prize, though. It will be so worth it!
  17. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from snugelkin in Kristen's Journey From Pre-Op and Beyond   
    11/3 will be here before you know it.
    I'm 10 months post-op and often refer back to my "decision day" photo. I am so glad I took it - it was the day I decided to have surgery. The day I went to the surgeon's office and cried when I got on the scale. At that moment I thought "this is the worst day of my life", when it was actually the point I decided to change my life. I took lots of pictures of myself along the way - it's funny to go back and re-live the last 10 months thru pictures and see how many body changed, I developed a chin line, my collarbones started to appear, etc.
    I also took my measurements - that helped me during those stalls you keep hearing about. It helped out a lot when the scale wasn't moving, but inches were coming off my body. It saved my sanity on more than a few occasions.
    Best of luck to you!
  18. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Andrea Guadiana in A days diet after VSG- Can anyone give examples?   
    I'm at 12 weeks right now - here's a typical day for me:
    Breakfast -
    Jimmy Dean turkey sausage patty
    scrambled egg topped w/ shredded cheese
    snack -
    powders?utm_source=BariatricPal&utm_medium=Affiliate&utm_campaign=CommentLink" target="_ad" data-id="1" >unjury Protein shake w/ 1/4 cup berries
    lunch -
    4 slices of lunch meat (1 1/2 to 2 ounces) wrapped w/ sharp cheddar cheese (1/2 to 1 ounce)
    Snack -
    Unjury Protein Shake
    dinner -
    2-3 ounces of chicken or beef
    a few bites of cooked broccoli
    Snack -
    Health Wise hot chocolate
  19. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Kevin326 in Regret at times   
    I think what you're feeling is perfectly normal. There have been times, even newly post-op, where I thought, "What did I do to myself?" Those feelings subsided after the first 6 months or so and at 2.5 years out, I don't have them any more.
    You can always get support here. Your local hospital may have a support group (even if you didn't get surgery there). You are not alone.
    Here's what I know 2.5 years out - my life is so much better. I do not regret this decision at all - there were times when I was having an emotional moment that I wished I could sit down to a big bowl of Pasta and go to town. There were times I wanted to eat an entire baguette of bread. There were times I wanted chocolate cake. But my sleeve was there for me - it didn't allow me to sabotage myself.
    My new normal is splitting a meal with my husband. Eating a hamburger without the bun. I still drink Protein shakes. But, I also allow some treats - a small bowl of ice cream, a cookie, a muffin, etc. But I don't crave them like I used to. I'm OK with my new normal.
    Hang in there, kid. You're going to be on an emotional roller coaster for the foreseeable future. It's going to be hard. Keep your eye on the prize, though. It will be so worth it!
  20. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Kevin326 in Regret at times   
    I think what you're feeling is perfectly normal. There have been times, even newly post-op, where I thought, "What did I do to myself?" Those feelings subsided after the first 6 months or so and at 2.5 years out, I don't have them any more.
    You can always get support here. Your local hospital may have a support group (even if you didn't get surgery there). You are not alone.
    Here's what I know 2.5 years out - my life is so much better. I do not regret this decision at all - there were times when I was having an emotional moment that I wished I could sit down to a big bowl of Pasta and go to town. There were times I wanted to eat an entire baguette of bread. There were times I wanted chocolate cake. But my sleeve was there for me - it didn't allow me to sabotage myself.
    My new normal is splitting a meal with my husband. Eating a hamburger without the bun. I still drink Protein shakes. But, I also allow some treats - a small bowl of ice cream, a cookie, a muffin, etc. But I don't crave them like I used to. I'm OK with my new normal.
    Hang in there, kid. You're going to be on an emotional roller coaster for the foreseeable future. It's going to be hard. Keep your eye on the prize, though. It will be so worth it!
  21. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from LipstickLady in not able to eat lunch with co-workers   
    No one at work knows I had surgery - they do know that I've lost a lot of weight...I always get the "you eat like a bird" comments.
    I just say things like, "I had a late lunch" or "I had a snack"
  22. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from LipstickLady in not able to eat lunch with co-workers   
    No one at work knows I had surgery - they do know that I've lost a lot of weight...I always get the "you eat like a bird" comments.
    I just say things like, "I had a late lunch" or "I had a snack"
  23. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from LipstickLady in not able to eat lunch with co-workers   
    No one at work knows I had surgery - they do know that I've lost a lot of weight...I always get the "you eat like a bird" comments.
    I just say things like, "I had a late lunch" or "I had a snack"
  24. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Kevin326 in Regret at times   
    I think what you're feeling is perfectly normal. There have been times, even newly post-op, where I thought, "What did I do to myself?" Those feelings subsided after the first 6 months or so and at 2.5 years out, I don't have them any more.
    You can always get support here. Your local hospital may have a support group (even if you didn't get surgery there). You are not alone.
    Here's what I know 2.5 years out - my life is so much better. I do not regret this decision at all - there were times when I was having an emotional moment that I wished I could sit down to a big bowl of Pasta and go to town. There were times I wanted to eat an entire baguette of bread. There were times I wanted chocolate cake. But my sleeve was there for me - it didn't allow me to sabotage myself.
    My new normal is splitting a meal with my husband. Eating a hamburger without the bun. I still drink Protein shakes. But, I also allow some treats - a small bowl of ice cream, a cookie, a muffin, etc. But I don't crave them like I used to. I'm OK with my new normal.
    Hang in there, kid. You're going to be on an emotional roller coaster for the foreseeable future. It's going to be hard. Keep your eye on the prize, though. It will be so worth it!
  25. Like
    McButterpants got a reaction from Daisee68 in Anyone ever thought:"I can do this on my own, I don't need the sugery"   
    I've been overweight my whole adult life. I tried every stupid fad diet (cabbage Soup sucks), supplements, exercise regiment, etc. One day my husband told me about the wife of a friend of his that had the lapland and showed me a picture. I had thought about WLS a few times previous, but this time was different.
    I did some superficial research and decided that I had to do something and do something now. I had checked out of my life. I really didn't care about much any more. I was becoming more and more disconnected from my family and friends. I was miserable.
    When I went into this, I hoped my only regret was that I didn't do this sooner (I was 43 when I had surgery). I can say, that is my only regret. It's hard and it's emotional, but looking back at the last 2.5 years, I am amazed - I found out I am stronger emotionally and physically that I knew. I reconnected with friends and I have a better and stronger relationship with my husband and son. I'm more outgoing. I love to exercise. I love to do hot yoga. I go hiking. I have energy to get me thru the day.
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