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Prestonandme

Gastric Bypass Patients
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  1. Thanks
    Prestonandme got a reaction from loridee11 in Symptoms of gallstones?   
    I didn't have neck or back pain, but had strong pains under my rib cage, usually after eating fatty foods. The pains were intermittent and sometimes would last hours, other times would cease sooner. Occasionally I felt winded, like my breathing was constricted.
  2. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from LaLaDee in Going in wrong direction-Help   
    A friend of mine gained back 60 lbs. seven years after her weight loss surgery. She was hovering at about 185 when she decided to take radical action to lose the weight. She began weighing and logging everything she ate and drank. She exercised more. And she became very careful about her diet -- giving up processed foods.
    She is now back to 125 lbs. So it can be done.
  3. Like
    Prestonandme reacted to Arabesque in Sugar cravings   
    Killing the sugar craving is hard. My mother is crazy for sweet. As a child she risked being bitten by a snake to grab a bag of lollies her mother had hidden on top of an old cabinet. That’s an addiction.😁
    Some people can’t tolerate sugar after surgery and dump. I can, but have killed most of my desire for it & now find lots of things too sweet. I went pretty cold turkey. Ate food I made myself. No treats. No Snacks. No dessert foods. That worked for me but I didn’t have really strong cravings - just missed specific treats.
    I looked for naturally sweet alternatives like fruit (just watch the serving sizes). Or even something with texture or a little salty when the cravings hit. I found freeze dried mangoes at my green grocer - yummy, crunchy & sweetish. Blue berries are fantastic. Melons are great too plus their high Water content is a bonus. Now I also make a plain chia pudding & add vanilla extract which makes it a little sweeter.
    Read labels carefully. Watch the ones with no added or low sugar as they likely use artificial sweeteners instead & they still feed your craving.
    Good luck.
  4. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from breavsg in I Think I Need to Resume Antidepressants   
    I've been taking Wellbutrin for several years. It didn't interfere whatsoever with my weight loss.
  5. Like
    Prestonandme reacted to ms.sss in Can't vomit   
    Ok, this is going to sound weird, but it is what it is:
    I have found that I have 2 “types” of vomiting: the regular kind, which involves heaving and seems to originate way down low in the belly. Then there is this “new” kind that developed after surgery: it feels more like “overflow”, as if its just stuff sitting near the esophagus and just slips out. Obviously the former is much more difficult and painful, but the latter is almost like burping and stuff comes out (and it feels like it originates way further up).
    Now, i dunno if this even makes sense to anyone else but me, but yeah, i find the “original” way of vomiting way, way, harder and energy-comsuming now (if i even can..)
    P.S. I was sleeved, and my vomiting ability/inability did not seem to affect my weight loss.
  6. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from JessLess in Going in wrong direction-Help   
    Perimenopause is the scourge of the gods. I had been normal weight until then and had been able to eat huge quantities of food and never gain weight. Then perimenopause: 136 to 245 at my highest, over the years. For some of us, our metabolism nosedives.
    You were doing great and still are in good shape. You've caught the gain creep in time and you're doing everything right -- logging/exercising... Maybe you might consider making a long list of really low-calorie foods (e.g., radishes, cherry tomatoes) that taste good and can satisfy snack cravings. Also, come to the forum whenever you need encouragement. Even if that means a few times a day for awhile. There are hundreds of thousands of posts by people who are in similar situations and also by people who have managed to overcome weight regain. We're in this together through the ups and downs. And we all, every one of us, go through them.
  7. Like
    Prestonandme reacted to AZhiker in Carbs and fats   
    I think the general feeling is to limit the carbs until you get closer to maintenance. Just getting the Protein and fluids in is a major accomplishment for a long time, and then adding veggies and some fruit is more than enough. Adding carbs and fatty foods like nuts and nut butters can slow down your weight loss. I reached goal in 7 months, but did not even think of adding a grain based carb, nuts, or nut butters until then. Then I added them very gradually, to ensure I wouldn't start regaining.
    I am 18 months out now, and am eating a whole foods plant based (WFPB) diet now. I get all my protein in, but it comes from legumes, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and non dairy milk/yogurt. I eat a lot of carbs now - but they are whole grains, legumes, fruits and veggies - nothing processed. I eat nuts and seeds every day. I also eat 8-10 servings of veggies/fruit every day, so I am NEVER hungry with that much volume. This all to say that there are a lot of different ways to eat after surgery, but initially, until you reach goal, you need to stick to your protein, Water, legumes, veggies. The other stuff can come later.
    The first 6 months are where you are going to lose a lot of weight. The first year is the golden year, and you want to maximize the opportunity to lose as much as you can during that time. After 12-18 months (sometimes sooner, sometimes later), the weight loss will slow down, your body will start absorbing nutrients more easily, you will lose the tight restriction, and all your new lifestyle modifications will be the real tools you will use to maintain your new weight. The surgery gets the weight off, but you need to do the rest. Don't waste those first months. Hold off on maintenance foods like grain based carbs, starchy vegetables, and nuts/nut butters until you are ready to stop losing and start maintaining. Just my 2 cents worth. I'm sure others will have different ideas.
  8. Like
    Prestonandme reacted to Sammi_Katt in 20 month mark but not losing weight.   
    I'm only 7 months out, but I've stalled a few times. My dietitian actually gave me a plan for what to do if I stall out for two weeks or longer, and that's change things up.
    Intermittent fasting, changing up your exercise routine, adjusting your calories throughout the week (doing 500, then 1000, then 1200, and then back to 1000, 500 and repeat). Stalls are there because your body got used to what it was doing (most of the time, there are other medical reasons for stalls as well, like constipation and gas and such). If you are only doing the elliptical, maybe try lifting weights or doing a rowing machine? Change it up. Your Protein goals sound fabulous, but maybe add a few carbs in there here and there.
    It's a lot of trial and error trying to figure out what works, which you obviously know. I think your weight is great, and you have done amazingly. Just hang in there, okay? ❤️
  9. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from LaLaDee in Going in wrong direction-Help   
    A friend of mine gained back 60 lbs. seven years after her weight loss surgery. She was hovering at about 185 when she decided to take radical action to lose the weight. She began weighing and logging everything she ate and drank. She exercised more. And she became very careful about her diet -- giving up processed foods.
    She is now back to 125 lbs. So it can be done.
  10. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from tahoegirl96118 in 60 years young and having surgery   
    I had my surgery last year when I was 59. Great results, no post-op pain whatsoever, fast recovery, etc. My one poor outcome was that the 100+ lb. weight loss aged me terribly. I look about ten years older than I did when I was fat and my skin is wrinkled like a SharPei's. That said, the WLS was still absolutely necessary and a lifesaver for me.
  11. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from LaLaDee in Going in wrong direction-Help   
    A friend of mine gained back 60 lbs. seven years after her weight loss surgery. She was hovering at about 185 when she decided to take radical action to lose the weight. She began weighing and logging everything she ate and drank. She exercised more. And she became very careful about her diet -- giving up processed foods.
    She is now back to 125 lbs. So it can be done.
  12. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from JessLess in Going in wrong direction-Help   
    Perimenopause is the scourge of the gods. I had been normal weight until then and had been able to eat huge quantities of food and never gain weight. Then perimenopause: 136 to 245 at my highest, over the years. For some of us, our metabolism nosedives.
    You were doing great and still are in good shape. You've caught the gain creep in time and you're doing everything right -- logging/exercising... Maybe you might consider making a long list of really low-calorie foods (e.g., radishes, cherry tomatoes) that taste good and can satisfy snack cravings. Also, come to the forum whenever you need encouragement. Even if that means a few times a day for awhile. There are hundreds of thousands of posts by people who are in similar situations and also by people who have managed to overcome weight regain. We're in this together through the ups and downs. And we all, every one of us, go through them.
  13. Thanks
    Prestonandme got a reaction from Melanie Vandergriff in Weight gain   
    Before surgery, people repeatedly suggested that I log my food at MyFitnessPal and weigh the food every day. That was way too burdensome for me.
    But when I reached maintenance weight a year post-surgery, this became my life-saver. Through MyFitnessPal, I discovered that prior to logging, I was eating about 300 calories a day more than my daily required caloric needs (1200/day) and was wildly off when I guesstimated how much food was in a cup. (I always overestimated). If I hadn't started logging and weighing, I would be quickly regaining all the weight I had just lost.
    Yah, it's a pain. It's time-consuming. And it's burdensome.
    But it may be what helps you lose those 10 pounds and shed even more.
  14. Thanks
    Prestonandme got a reaction from Melanie Vandergriff in Weight gain   
    Before surgery, people repeatedly suggested that I log my food at MyFitnessPal and weigh the food every day. That was way too burdensome for me.
    But when I reached maintenance weight a year post-surgery, this became my life-saver. Through MyFitnessPal, I discovered that prior to logging, I was eating about 300 calories a day more than my daily required caloric needs (1200/day) and was wildly off when I guesstimated how much food was in a cup. (I always overestimated). If I hadn't started logging and weighing, I would be quickly regaining all the weight I had just lost.
    Yah, it's a pain. It's time-consuming. And it's burdensome.
    But it may be what helps you lose those 10 pounds and shed even more.
  15. Like
    Prestonandme reacted to kgfan1 in Gained almost all weight back   
    So I first had VBG (banded gastroplasty) in 2001. I lost 100 pounds and then plateaued and stayed at the new weight until 2012. All of the sudden I couldn’t eat anything. I threw up everything I ate. I had an endoscopy which showed scar tissue blockage. I had a revision into a gastric bypass. After that the weight flew off, eventually I had lost a total (including the 100 from the first surgery) 197 pounds. Three pounds away from my goal of losing 200 pounds. Then all of the sudden weight loss stopped. One day I had a few sips of Mtn Dew and I didn’t get sick. So the next day I had a whole glass. Then a whole can. Wow, I had all that sugar and no dumping. Maybe I can have a candy bar. Same result. You see where this is going. Now eight years later I have gained 160 pounds back. It makes me physically sick to think of what I’m putting my body through, let alone the emotional part of feeling like a big fat loser (no pun intended). I cut out the Mtn Dew and am drinking Mtn Dew Zero. I want to cut that out too but can’t find a drink that satisfies me. For those of you who know the feeling of gaining weight back, how are you handling it and do you have suggestions on how to get motivated to start losing? I’m desperate and need feedback. Thanks ahead of time.
  16. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from breavsg in I Think I Need to Resume Antidepressants   
    I've been taking Wellbutrin for several years. It didn't interfere whatsoever with my weight loss.
  17. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from ProudGrammy in *Almost 1 year post op   
    The fear of regain is what motivates me daily. So many people say that WLS patients start regaining weight around the third year post-surgery. I know four people who had WLS ten years ago, and three of them regained -- one 40 lbs., another 60 lbs., and the third about 100 lbs. Only my former roommate stayed at 125 lbs. and it's a bit of a miracle because she eats pretty mindlessly -- but always stops when she feels full.
    I had my one year WLS anniversary five days ago and that is when I changed up my game. Before this, I eyeballed my food and exercised a little and the weight came easily off. But now I am logging and weighing everything, and am exercising daily. I really don't want to regain. That's my motivation.
  18. Like
    Prestonandme reacted to catwoman7 in 8 Years Post OP - Weight Gain   
    I started calorie counting when I was about a year out, and still do it at five years out. It's the only way I can keep on top of my weight (although not everyone likes this method - some find it a bit obsessive. But it's worked for ME). I can maintain my weight if I stay within the 1500-1700 calorie range, but this is going to be different for everyone. To lose, I stay at the low end of my range (or under) most days. If I go over 1700 too often, my weight starts heading north.
    you might want to start tracking what you're eating in something like My Fitness Pal (although there are other decent apps, too), just to see how many calories you're averaging. You'll probably have to do it for a week or two to get a good average, since some days you'll eat more than others (as we all do...). Then try to cut your average by 100 calories. If after a couple of weeks you're not seeing results on the scale, cut another 100 calories. Rinse and repeat. I find it difficult to drastically cut my calories, but if I ease them down like this, it's much easier to adjust. At some point, you're going to reach your sweet spot where you're losing again.
    btw - I still count Protein grams, but I don't count carb grams anymore - but some people have to because they're very carb sensitive (I'm not particularly carb sensitive). For me it's the protein and overall calories at this point.
  19. Like
    Prestonandme reacted to BriarRose in What's healthy range for Carbs after WLS?   
    I am 10 years out. Lost 140 pounds. In last 5 years gained 40back. Life happens. In the last year I have lost 36 of those pounds. How ? Back to basics. Protein - I grill fish or chicken or beef. Portion it up - then I make lots of vegetables - fresh riced cauliflower brocolli carrots and chop in onions or garlic fresh herbs steamed and then a quick sautéed in olive oil - meals for lunch and dinner for a few days. Hot cold - over salad - add stir fry veggies to that .... filling and all healthy. My carbs come from the veggies and fresh fruit. I also will have a daily treat that I don’t count - as anything. One skinny cow ice cream or a piece of chocolate - 2 little dove bites are heaven. And I am in control !!! Intentional eating.
  20. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from breavsg in I Think I Need to Resume Antidepressants   
    I've been taking Wellbutrin for several years. It didn't interfere whatsoever with my weight loss.
  21. Thanks
    Prestonandme got a reaction from 90’schild in All I want to do is cheat on my diet   
    Here's a link to a Ricotta Bake recipe from BariatricBits, for when you are able to tolerate soft foods:
    https://bariatricbits.com/single-serve-baked-ricotta/
    It's quick and easy to make, and is less than 150 calories.
  22. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from Tracyringo in Constipation   
    Right after surgery, I experienced terrible constipation, too. I tried all sorts of remedies to no avail. The only thing that helped in my case was Fleet enemas.
  23. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from ms.sss in Do you see yourself as thin yet?   
    I'm currently reading "Hunger" by Roxane Gay. It is a memoir about being morbidly obese, how one perceives the world, and how the world perceives the obese. At her heaviest, Gay was 577 pounds at 6'3. She does not disclose her current weight, but Google Images shows that she's still very obese.
    I found it interesting that Gay went with her father to a seminar about weight loss surgery and walked out disgusted. She called the videos of the surgery "grotesque and chilling" and the weight loss seminar "a total freak show." She and her father concluded that she is "not at this point yet." "A little more self control. Exercising twice a day. That's all you need," said her father. Gay admits she desires the results of weight loss surgery but does not want to undergo the surgery.
    Though she repeatedly denies the damaging health effects of obesity and devotes an entire book to the struggles of being obese and and coping with the harsh perceptions and judgment of others, she is unable and unwilling to do what's necessary to change her life.
    According to one study, only one obese woman out of seven is still alive at 75 years old. Gay is in her forties. I hope she one day saves herself from an early death.
  24. Thanks
    Prestonandme got a reaction from 90’schild in All I want to do is cheat on my diet   
    Here's a link to a Ricotta Bake recipe from BariatricBits, for when you are able to tolerate soft foods:
    https://bariatricbits.com/single-serve-baked-ricotta/
    It's quick and easy to make, and is less than 150 calories.
  25. Like
    Prestonandme got a reaction from JessLess in Low BMR after bariatric surgery   
    I'm just over 60 and was told several times by both my nutritionist and surgeon that the best way to boost BMR is to build muscle.
    AARP currently is hosting a "Get Moving" video series for strengthening the body, something that we older people need to do. Here's a link to the first videos:
    https://campaigns.aarp.org/getmovingLP1/?cmp=IM-HEALTH-HL-LPTWO-2020-Previous
    It requires a time investment of as little as 10 minutes a day.
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