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First of all, I'm getting sleeved in 30 days! I can't even wrap my head around it yet, but I need to. I'm also undergoing therapy with a certified mental health counselor. I am a compulsive over eater and probably a food addict. I rarely eat when I'm hungry, instead I go all day without eating and binge at night after work. I start my 21 day preop liquid diet in 9 days. I've considered doing a test run day where I just do liquids, but silly as it sounds, I don't want to sacrifice a day of eating my favorite foods in the quantities I want. Because I know those days are now numbered. This has made my therapist nervous, and he thinks I might not do well postop when I cannot engage in my compulsive behavior. He also thinks that my eating and fatness is a defense mechanism or a security issue. He's worried I'll rupture my sleeve trying to eat too soon postoperatively, or too much.

Some might ask why I would consider a restrictive procedure when I'm so out of control. This is a last ditch effort to get back in control. I'm only 28, but I already have sleep apnea and GERD. I work in healthcare, I'm getting my doctorate, and I'm a smart cookie. But this addiction is killing me, and I feel that this is an extreme step that will help me do a HARD RESET on my mind and body. I need to relearn my relationship with food, and only use it for fuel for the rest of my life. I can't allow my happiness to be contingent on what and how much goes into my mouth.

Phew, now that that's done, here's my question. To those of you who identify or consider yourselves to be or have been compulsive over-eaters or food addicts...did the surgery help? I unfortunately jumped on the duodenal switch forums and read a few posts about VSG patients who stretched their sleeves and had to do the switch in order to stop absorbing nutrients to lose weight. I don't want to go to that extreme, I don't want to be dependent on Vitamins and minerals and get blood tests more frequently than annually. I just want to be normal.

What do you guys think? Sorry for the long post. Thanks in advance for the helpful comments.

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All the sleeve surgery does is restrict the amount you can eat at one time. It can also curb physical hunger, but if someone is an emotional eater that won't make much difference. Weight loss surgery is only a treatment for obesity, not a cure.

It's hard work to get over the dependence on food we all seem to have. You working with a therapist is a great step. The reason

WLS fails for so many people is because they never can get into the mindset they need to be successful. You can find ways to eat around the sleeve, bypass etc, so if you're not 100% committed to changing your lifestyle and getting the professional help needed to do it, no amount of surgeries will work. Sure, the malabsorbtion surgeries will help you lose weight, but as soon as things stretch out and you're able to eat more, if you haven't changed your eating habits and lifestyle, you are at a very high risk of regain. Please keep working with your therapist and make sure you are 100% comitted to the lifestyle, or sadly, it will all be for not. It's not going to be easy, but so worth it! Good luck to you!

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I don't know if it is necessarily the actual procedure that helps. You will see it said her often that they operate on your stomach not your brain so you can still have head hunger. Having said that, it is the therapy that is helping me with this struggle. I am still seeing my therapist and will continue ur to for quite some time. The surgery will physically prevent you from overeating in the beginning merely because it will make you sick but the stomach hunger will return and you will be able to eat more volume eventually. Ideally you will use the honeymoon period to change your habits and (as my therapist just said) you "conditioning". You are doing the right thing by seeking therapy. Don't give that up. It is the best tool in your arsenal next to the smaller stomach (or maybe even more than). Good luck on your journey!

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It forces you to detox on all the bad crap your body is currently telling you that you need. To me that has helped with the food addiction part of things but once you can start eating more foods it becomes up to you to make the right choices.

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I appreciate your honesty. I too relied on food and wine for so many reasons other than nutrition. Sometimes I have to remind myself that I had to give up every addiction over night and it's hard. That being said it is so worth it! I think you are stronger than you think! I'm quite a bit older than you, 52, but emotions are still the same. Once you start feeling better you will create new healthy habits in your life. I'm down roughly 100lbs since last summer and about 65lbs from surgery last February. I still struggle at times with wanting to turn to food but no where near what it used to be. It's a huge commitment and you really do have to take care of yourself and be particular about what you're eating but again it's a choice and surgery is just another tool to help but one I'll never regret! One of the best decisions I've ever made!

Good luck!

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I was a food addict just like you describe! I'm proud to say I've kicked the habit! Food has become to me a means to fuel my body. My hunger is way less than it used to be I can control it. Eating is less enjoyable than before it's hard to explain. I'm 8 weeks out and down to 167 from 207. I eat super low carb and that helps with craving bad crap. Once you have it done your feelings about food change completely! Plus your body detoxes from all the crap and you feel different and foods taste different. It's pretty cool!

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Getting the sleeve was/is a life-or-death decision for me. I chose life.

It is just a tool. But, it's s powerful tool that helps with physical hunger, metabolism, body chemistry, etc.

I still need to do the mental, emotional, and spiritual work.

You can be successful in treating your food addiction but you have to use ALL your tools and support resources.

With the help of your surgical team and your therapist, along with support groups and/or recovery groups, family, friends, a faith community, or whoever you trust to help you through, you can do it.

Best of luck to you and keep us posted. This site is an awesome resource for both information and encouragement.

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I'm at 9 weeks out from surgery, and I can say that for the first six weeks it's a chore to eat anything. It has helped me get away from my comfort foods, because they no longer provided me any comfort at all. That said, as I'm able to eat and enjoy food more, I'm having to make very deliberate choices as to what I will eat and what I won't. I'm also trying to transfer the love I felt for food to a love of movement and exercise. Maybe I can shift my cravings to something healthy.

Best of luck to you. As I said, I'm new to the journey, but this has been my experience so far.

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I struggled with these same thoughts as well before surgery. Now I am 2 months post op and I don't regret getting the surgery at all. But I think the true test will be 1 to 2 years out when the honeymoon is over. I hope and pray I have the strength, diligence and motivation then as I do now to stay on track.

I think we all can do it if we remember how important this is to us, to out health and to our mobility.

Basically, its one day at a time and we can choose to make the healthy choice every moment of every day.

Good luck and I wish you well!

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I too have been going to a therapist for some time and my surgery is in November. It scares me so much that my addiction will take over. I eat when I'm full to the point of where I feel sick. I keep working on it in therapy and I use self talk to tell myself I am not hungry and to not eat mindlessly. I wanted to try the preop diet for myself to test my level of commitment to this.

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Wanted to comment back on this post. This helped my food addiction. I no longer consider myself a food addict or a compulsive over eater. The surgery forced me to find alternative ways to deal with my emotional triggers. Beyond grateful I did this! post-259838-1456708865267_thumb.jpg

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First of all, I'm getting sleeved in 30 days! I can't even wrap my head around it yet, but I need to. I'm also undergoing therapy with a certified mental health counselor. I am a compulsive over eater and probably a food addict. I rarely eat when I'm hungry, instead I go all day without eating and binge at night after work. I start my 21 day preop liquid diet in 9 days. I've considered doing a test run day where I just do liquids, but silly as it sounds, I don't want to sacrifice a day of eating my favorite foods in the quantities I want. Because I know those days are now numbered. This has made my therapist nervous, and he thinks I might not do well postop when I cannot engage in my compulsive behavior. He also thinks that my eating and fatness is a defense mechanism or a security issue. He's worried I'll rupture my sleeve trying to eat too soon postoperatively, or too much.

Some might ask why I would consider a restrictive procedure when I'm so out of control. This is a last ditch effort to get back in control. I'm only 28, but I already have sleep apnea and GERD. I work in healthcare, I'm getting my doctorate, and I'm a smart cookie. But this addiction is killing me, and I feel that this is an extreme step that will help me do a HARD RESET on my mind and body. I need to relearn my relationship with food, and only use it for fuel for the rest of my life. I can't allow my happiness to be contingent on what and how much goes into my mouth.

Phew, now that that's done, here's my question. To those of you who identify or consider yourselves to be or have been compulsive over-eaters or food addicts...did the surgery help? I unfortunately jumped on the duodenal switch forums and read a few posts about VSG patients who stretched their sleeves and had to do the switch in order to stop absorbing nutrients to lose weight. I don't want to go to that extreme, I don't want to be dependent on Vitamins and minerals and get blood tests more frequently than annually. I just want to be normal.

What do you guys think? Sorry for the long post. Thanks in advance for the helpful comments.

I have had a band 4 years. It messed up 10 months ago and I have went back to alot of my compulsive eating. Gained 20+pounds. I have to say the band did help me. You simply cant eat alot and as soon as the weight starts coming off, you just want to keep goung because you realize how much better you feel. This is why I am so excited to get my sleeve in April

Sent from my SM-G900P using the BariatricPal App

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Thanks for the update. Glad you've done so well. I think the key is the fact you sought the help of both a surgeon AND mental health professionals to combat your issues. The fight against obesity is both a physical and psychological battle. So many people overlook the importance of the latter. Congrats!

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Reading the comments, you can really see that everyone is different.

I am only 5 weeks out but really struggling with my old demons - it is just as tough as a 'normal' diet, pre being sleeved. It is all about making the right choices & not giving in to the old temptations!

From reading other peoples comments, I feel as if it is too early for me to having such a difficult time but like I said everyone is different!

I really hoped I would be one of those people who wouldn't be hungry & who would have to remind themselves to eat but I am not so it is going to be an ongoing battle but I really want this to be a success so I will keep trying until they come up with the neuro-sleeve!

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