Jump to content
×
Are you looking for the BariatricPal Store? Go now!

ProjectMe

Gastric Sleeve Patients
  • Content Count

    1,151
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About ProjectMe

  • Rank
    Bariatric Master

About Me

  • Gender
    Female

Recent Profile Visitors

4,046 profile views
  1. My nutritionist was awesome and a great help to me! I lost 60 pounds in the 6 months prior to surgery because of his workshops, no nonsense attitude and his wealth of knowledge about the body and nutrition. I wouldnt be where I am today without him.
  2. ProjectMe

    Where's the FUPA?

    LOL about using the acronym "FUPA"!!! Draya...love BB wives
  3. LOL! Before surgery, I would just walk up & down aisles getting whatever I thought we needed. Now, I have two lists. One for the family & one for me. And I spend waaay more time in the grocery store reading labels...kids don't even want to go with me anymore.
  4. ProjectMe

    Concerns

    Ugh...as hard as it is...comparing your loss with others will only result in alot of unnecessary anxiety. Not only are our bodies completely different from one another, our wls journeys are unique to the particular individual. When you consider age, sex, surgeon, metabolism, medical histories, genetics, etc...its like comparing apples with oranges. As long as you are following your surgeon's & nutritionist plans...you are doing GREAT!
  5. I would suggest that you check with your Dr. and get some labs done. Vitamin deficiencies can cause you to bruise very easily.
  6. I also thought this would be the one requirement that I would have trouble with. Surprisingly, it was pretty easy to adopt after surgery. I never had any trouble with getting liquids down. I pretty much sip all day, but stop at least 15 minutes prior to eating (per my nutritionists requirements). I get full very quickly when eating so I definitely eat my protein first, then a few veggies. I couldnt imagine trying to drink at the same time. There just isn't any room. I usually resume drinking after 60-90 minutes depending on how my tummy feels.
  7. I didn't expect my husband to switch up his lifestyle just because I chose to have surgery. It was my choiceto jump through the 6 months worth of hoops, go under the knife for the 13th and hopefully last time and change my mindset towards food. Because this was my choice, I did not change what I normally did for my family. I still cook dinner every night....although I may double up on the veggies & skip making the starchy sides for them. The interesting thing is my husband began to adopt my lifestyle in small ways over time. He has since lost over 60 pounds. While I appreciate the support...I didn't change my lifestyle for him. I did it for me.
  8. ProjectMe

    What We Don't Want To Hear

    For me personally...once I took my ego out of the picture and reread the article, I agree with it in its entirety. The first time I read it, i was a little perturbed by the 100 lbs being solely attributed to WLS. I lost 60 pounds prior to surgery by following the bariatric diet. Then I reread the article and inferred that the author isn't talking about what we lost prior to surgery. He or she is talking about what we do AFTER surgery. Personally, I know that I am no different from anyone else. I know that if I go off my plan, eat whatever I want, exercise when/if I want to...I will gain all the weight back and then some. And I've worked too hard to let that happen. This article helped me FOCUS and stop making excuses.
  9. I don't really see why you can't have any alcohol ever, unless you know you are prone to addiction or something. I do agree that drinking it daily would be stupid, since it's empty calories. Soda has carbonation, which some believe can stretch the sleeve and I'm not willing to take that chance, so I avoid it 100% of the time. But I have had alcohol several times in the last 9 months. Maybe once a month or so once I was allowed. Just at social occasions and I'm very careful about it, because I have noticed I get drunk much faster post-sleeve, so absolutely NO driving the entire night, just to be on the safe side. I'm generally opposed to drinking my calories, but I don't see the harm in drinking in moderation on occasion. My program is very conservative and my team also said no alcohol ever. As already mentioned the cross addiction & empty calories being the main reasons. I hardly drank prior to surgery anyways so definitely not a sacrifice for me. Regarding the OP, if you were to honestly provide a journal of everything you are drinking & eating to your surgeon, what would he or she think?
  10. Someone shared this article from bariatriceating.com that I wanted to share here: Don’t eat bread! That latte has 35g sugar! No macaroni salad. NO tortillas. No rice. It won’t last without change There is no delicate way to say this. We have always set ourselves apart from other bariatric groups in that we don’t look the other way while post ops continue to eat the bad carbs. We try and bring them back to the bariatric reality. We coax you to knock off the Pasta, rice, tortillas or bread and often people get mad or try and justify it. For years we’ve watched people blow through this surgery and they all have the same story. Everyone thinks they are ‘Different’, that they can handle the bad carbs and the sugar (they don’t get sick!) and ‘because they have lost 100 pounds in 7 months they must be doing something right’. The first hundred pounds is the surgery Hate to keep making the same point, but your surgery did it, not you. Remember that you are not driving the car for the first year. Eating the same foods that grew you to 300 pounds, but in smaller amounts is not a good long term plan as eventually you will be able to eat larger portions. Ask yourself why eating the same bad carbs would be a good plan. No doctor has advised you to eat the same way post op as you did pre op. Post ops pick this up somewhere, latch on to it and defend it, often to the bitter end of a total regain. No one fights for broccoli carbs! It’s not that the bagel will kill you, it’s that these carbs make you hungry. They rapidly turn to glucose and burn… poof, gone, #Lookingformore. They don’t give you any nutrients. They don’t create a feeling of satiety or lasting fullness. The empty carbs work against what you are trying to achieve. If you were arguing for eating salad or green bean carbs, more power to you… but people are trying to hang on to foods without value. If this big argument was for VEGETABLES… well it wouldn’t be a debate as vegetables didn’t make us fat, it was those ‘other’ carbs. Did you ever meet an obese vegetarian and wonder ‘HUH?’… how’d they get obese if they are vegetarian? Same deal… its not the vegetables, its the other stuff… the carbs… the potatoes, bread, macaroni, rice, tortillas and sugar! Square peg… round hole Stop looking for slightly better substitutes for bad choices and find new healthier foods to love instead. We keep trying to force that square peg into that round hole. Stop EATING crackers and chips… don’t find ones that you can justify because they have fewer carbs. Enough with the terrible fishy shirataki tofu noodles. Learn to live without bread and pasta so it will not call your name. We aren’t changing the behavior or trend if we continue eating them, just slightly shifting it. Before long you’ve got your hand back in the Doritos bag & fork in the Mac and cheese. Look It’s Protein Cheesecake! Don’t add protein to muffins and convince yourself they’re good for you. Stop with the Starbucks Creme Brûlée Lattes because ‘they’re your one indulgence'; they have 500 calories and thin people don’t even drink them. Stay the heck out of Wendy’s. I read an article the other day touting all the ‘good choices’ in fast food restaurants. How about stay out of them. That’s the best choice of all! Why go to the place where you know there is danger. Before you know it, oops… there are fries in your bag! You know people gain back weight, right? In our first month of new Facebook Support group I have cried for new members who have gained back all their weight. I am not immune either after fourteen years, three bariatric books and knowing better. When life hit the fan, I comforted my bruises in the way I knew best and it has taken me ten months to lose fifty pounds of it. People are having revisions, a lovely sounding word for a second serious body damaging operation. What will change? Unless there is major change along with that new surgery, won’t it have the same result? Step away from the bagel! Own that there was and maybe still is something wrong with your food picker! Use surgery as an opportunity to change, not cheat. I used be bothered by the ‘word on the street’ that we were the carb or food police, but am now proud of it. If you want to promote the virtues of Everything in Moderation while eating half a Subway, there are plenty of groups that will help you do it. If you want to eat right and learn new behaviors to make the feeling of slipping on those skinny jeans last… we have a support group that’s a healthier fit. Bariatric Surgery IS the easy way out It’s a personal food cop that is always with us, that helps us push away from the table. We make it hard when we don’t live by the bariatric rules we’ve been given. There is nothing harder then gaining weight back after surgery. There is nothing better than losing it a second time. Control is empowering. If you need to pick up and start losing again… If you need to work off a regain… it’s not too late and your pouch works just fine if you choose the right foods. Clean those lethal carbs from your life and go back to Bariatric Eating – protein first and lots of fresh salad and vegetables. We’ve got the support for you to make that change!
  11. My team (Surgeons, Nurses, Nutritionists, Psychologist) made it very clear that I would lose 50-60% of the excess weight IF I followed the plan. I knew wholeheartedly that WLS was only 1 leg of a 3 legged stool (the other 2 legs being diet & exercise). So keeping all that in mind and knowing that I wanted to reach goal in as quick a time frame as possible, I very purposefully followed the bariatric plan 6 months prior to surgery. I lost 60 pounds before I had the sleeve so my BMI the day of surgery was fairly low @ 31-32. I am 5 months out from surgery and 10 pounds away from goal. But losing the weight is just half the battle. I'm hoping that I've done the plan long enough to where it has been ingrained as habit...but I know that I have to follow the plan for life in order to keep the weight off.
  12. ProjectMe

    Call the Bariatrics police!

    ^^^^Rationalizing at its best^^^. I'm out.
  13. ProjectMe

    Call the Bariatrics police!

    My program is very conservative, particularly about alcohol. The transference of addictions was the main concern, as nutritionist, surgeons, psycholologist, and nurses all discussed with me during all stages of this process. I drank maybe a glass of wine a month before surgery, so didn't quite understand what the big deal was. Well after they showed the research during our various meetings...I no longer questioned the importance of being aware of this problem. Combine the research proven issues of addiction, empty calories, stress on the liver after a major surgery, not to mention my new tummy is so small I really don't want to waste space on alcohol...I choose not to go against my program's rules in regards to alcohol. Just not worth it in my opinion. But something I've learned on boards...some people rationalize/loosely interpret their programs rules...so my words or the words of way more experienced/successful others is taken offense to or just ignored anyways no matter how much logic is provided. Folks will do what they want to do period. Again this seems like program recommendations, where is the research you speak of that was presented to you ? I would like to see that.I am a librarian so research is my thing. However, I'm leery of spending my time locating the research for you when a simple Google search using the key words, "alcohol dependence bariatric surgery" returns quite a few results. Seems like this issue is no secret. If I thought it would make a difference & you would use this info in a responsible manner, I'd hop on that research for you. But Something tells me that you are going to do what you want to do anyways. What I don't get is why not save time & take your surgeon's & the many folks on this board's word for it. I mean we can't all be blindly following our programs plans without logic & reason... right?
  14. ProjectMe

    Call the Bariatrics police!

    My program is very conservative, particularly about alcohol. The transference of addictions was the main concern, as nutritionist, surgeons, psycholologist, and nurses all discussed with me during all stages of this process. I drank maybe a glass of wine a month before surgery, so didn't quite understand what the big deal was. Well after they showed the research during our various meetings...I no longer questioned the importance of being aware of this problem. Combine the research proven issues of addiction, empty calories, stress on the liver after a major surgery, not to mention my new tummy is so small I really don't want to waste space on alcohol...I choose not to go against my program's rules in regards to alcohol. Just not worth it in my opinion. But something I've learned on boards...some people rationalize/loosely interpret their programs rules...so my words or the words of way more experienced/successful others is taken offense to or just ignored anyways no matter how much logic is provided. Folks will do what they want to do period.

PatchAid Vitamin Patches

×