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AvaFern

Gastric Sleeve Patients
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  1. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  2. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  3. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  4. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  5. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  6. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  7. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  8. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  9. Like
    AvaFern reacted to roxy726 in I don't get it.   
    @avafern...lol @one day you won't be perfect... Love love that!!!
    Sent from my iPhone using the BariatricPal App
  10. Like
    AvaFern reacted to Babbs in I don't get it.   
    @@AvaFern
    Your diet wouldn't work for me, because at my age, my emphasis is more on health and nutrition. I would feel like sh*t if I ate like that. And I'm so over feeling like sh*t all the time.
    But you do you.
  11. Like
    AvaFern reacted to LittleBill in I don't get it.   
    @@AvaFern - Great post! I think the best line of the whole thing though, is this one:
    "Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God,"
  12. Like
    AvaFern reacted to theantichick in I don't get it.   
    The old joke goes... What is the difference between a surgeon and God? God doesn't think he's a surgeon.
    sent from mobile device
  13. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  14. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  15. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Xombae in I don't get it.   
    I'm not offended by your post- you certainly have a right to your frustration. As a heads-up though, I am one of those people that didn't follow all of the rules post-op (after the 6-week point- during the first 6 weeks I was an angel), because I have a medical background and I am fully aware of what will hurt me as opposed to what will just make it hard to lose weight. Every surgeon has different guidelines, so there is nothing wrong with getting opinion from others when there is a documented difference in what surgeon's suggest. Some surgeons still tell you not to use a straw, and yet my surgeon took the time to explain to me why (because some people end up with gas that makes them uncomfortable) and knowing this, using a straw was the only way I got in enough fluids the first few weeks. Many surgeons, in fact almost all, still say you can't drink with your meals. This is not a medically required rule, but rather a guideline that was set because they don't want you to wash the food out of your stomach faster, feel full for a shorter amount of time, and then eat more. A lot of surgeons say no carbonation ever, and yet the origin of this rule is because after the first few weeks (before that the carbonation can irritate your stomach), if people had been weaned off of carbonation, there was a good chance they had eliminated empty calories from non-diet soda. Carbonation won't hurt you after you're healed, but it certainly won't help your diet and teaching it as a "rule" is designed for the benefit of weight loss, not actual immediate health effects (yes it's bad for you, but no it won't kill you right this minute).
    Despite their belief to the contrary, surgeons are not actually God, and not all of their directions should be taken as the bible- many yes, but certainly not all. When you are being reasonable in your question (it's 2 months out, can I have a few bites of a burger?- YES, you can), that's sort of the point that forums exist. The idea is to be supportive, not to be holier than thou because you were perfect on the diet and someone else wasn't. I have been within 3 pounds of my goal weight for two years, and at or below goal for about 20 months, and guess what...sometimes I eat crap and I have done so the entire time I have been sleeved. Some people do well with strict rules, and others do not, but when your stomach has healed, you are not physically hurting it by eating crap, you're just hurting your chance of ever being healthy.
    I had a granola bar for Breakfast today, goldfish for lunch, and 1/4 of a lean cuisine for dinner. I also had 4 SF Red Bulls, and about 6 cans of diet pepsi. Yesterday I hadn't slept for 40 hours and I had a cookie for dinner. It was good. I did not die or wake up fat, although I am 100% sure my surgeon would not be remotely pleased.
    Life is for the living and for the imperfect, and online forums can be a place to knock others down or pick them back up. Every time you make a post you get to decide what kind of person you want to be, to a type of person who may be just like you...scared, alone, sad, and very much in need of a bit of grace. I read plenty of posts where I role my eyes and think the person is an idiot...I then hit the little "x" and move on.
    I think it is awesome that you have been so successful and I completely appreciate your right to your frustration, but ultimately, it's not your problem that other people break the rules, so why waste your energy caring? Either click the little "x", grumble about how stupid people are, and move on, or take a little bit of time to provide constructive (key word there) guidance in a way that will not further the hurt and isolation that they already feel. One day you won't be perfect and someone will be kind to you... and it will make all the difference.
  16. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from OutsideMatchInside in Doctor has a lawsuit   
    Nah, doctors get sued all the time. If she has a lot of suits, then, like Babbs said, maybe be concerned, but it is very difficult to entirely avoid being sued as a doctor, especially as a surgeon. Doctors are also easy targets because their insurance almost always settles claims out of court, which keeps the claim usually sealed, but also works out to people knowing they can make a few $ in civil court without a whole lot of actual basis for the claim.
  17. Like
    AvaFern reacted to heidikat72 in The Statistics are not in our favor? (According to my worried Dad)   
    With all due respect, your father doesn't understand how to interpret statistics associated with potential complications - you don't just simply add them up to arrive at a "total".
    If he truly read the article you reference with an OPEN mind, he would have seen that for nausea and dehydration - the article itself even says this is when patients aren't getting in enough fluids. This is why the bariatric programs and the vets on this forum always always always stress how important it is to meet your Fluid intake goals. Seriously, getting in your fluids those first few weeks is YOUR JOB - even if it takes you 18hrs a day of constant sipping, DO IT. Drinking will get easier as the swelling goes down and you can drink more normally (rather than teeny tiny sips). But it is always important to track your Fluid intake and make sure you are getting enough.
    As for GERD - it does happen but often is temporary - and most bariatric programs will have you on a PPI for a couple months. You may need to have your dosage adjusted, you may need to stay on it longer - but as long as you work with your bariatric team on this and don't ignore the symptoms, it is manageable.
    Gallstones - yep this is a common one. And yes, a gallstone attack can be excruciatingly painful. But you know what? I'd still rather have a couple gallstone attacks and get my gallbladder removed if needed than deal with all the other LIFELONG and LIFE THREATENING side effects of obesity. Oh and guess what, there's a good chance you could end up with gallstones at some point even if you don't have WLS.
    Strictures - there are people on this forum who have had a stricture. Perhaps one of them can weigh in here. I believe at least some of them have been able to have it corrected/managed and still don't regret the surgery one bit.
    Deep vein thrombosis - a risk with any surgery honestly especially when your mobility may not be great immediately following. This is especially true with obese patients who already have mobility issues and/or aren't active. Many programs assess your risk for this based on your current condition and family history of blood clots. Based on this, it may be recommended to have an IVC filter put in your leg temporarily - the filter will catch any clots that form and migrate before they reach your lungs and lead to a pulmonary embolism. The more common approach is to administer blood thinner injections for a couple weeks after surgery. And to walk walk walk walk walk as much as you can post op - the more active you are, the less the change of a blot developing in the first place!
    Nutritional deficiency - this is why you take Vitamins, calcium/vitamin D supplements and B12 supplements. Why you focus on Protein first, followed by veggies then fruit and lastly starches. And why you get your blood work checked regularly post op so that any deficiencies can be treated before they become a problem. For instance on my program, that means blood work at 3, 6, 9, 12 18 and 24 months post op and annually thereafter. Also, with the sleeve you don't have the malabsorption associated with the bypass. Your Vitamin supplementation is due to the reduced volume intake. And I know personally many sleeve patients who once they are a couple years out have been able to cut back to supplementing with just one Multivitamin a day.
    I am guessing he thinks the forums are a joke because they don't support his pre-conceived negativity regarding this surgery? What exactly does he think your other options are and what are the "stats" associated with those options? His scare tactics are disgusting. Would he rather your life be shortened and your quality of life be miserable with the obesity? Have you really told him truthfully and completely the impact the obesity has on your life?
    At the end of the day - you are a 46 year old woman. You don't need daddy to sign off on your surgery. I understand wanting family emotional support - but if you don't get it, you can still go ahead with surgery. This is a decision to be made between you and your medical team. Is dad willing to go to an appointment with your medical team and hear directly from them? Ask about the complications, how they can be mitigated and what their practice's actual complication rate is? Or is he so stuck in his negativity that he wouldn't listen to the medical professionals either?
  18. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Katrina Nedby in 6 days post op and screwed up bad...   
    When I saw your post and that it was in the trending section I had an idea of how it was going to go and I thought...ahh poor person who thought it was a good idea to post here about blowing their post-op liquid diet. I hope you have thick skin.
    I like to comment on all of the posts about screwing up the diets that everyone else followed religiously and never messed up, because I am generally a big proponent of doing what works for you, which is often directly against what the literature says you should be doing. My stipulation though is that rules can be bent a smidge at the phase when you're almost done with soft foods, and flat out broken at some point beyond the two month mark where you can't actually hurt yourself by eating anything, but just won't really do yourself any favors. In the first weeks after surgery, even I, the person who most heavily advocates for making informed decisions that don't always align with doctor's orders, tend to say to stick with the plan you are given because it does actually impact your health and safety.
    That being said...clearly you know you made a mistake and since you've been commenting in here, you're doing just fine. Your mistake didn't hurt you this time, and so use this as a learning experience and move forward. We all screw up, but those of us who have maintained weight loss successfully know that when you fall off the wagon, you just have to get right back up. For the next few weeks, you aren't going to feel great, you will want normal food, and you are going to be cranky. It really does get better from here though and soon enough you will be back at a point where you can eat whatever you want (in small portions) and if your experience is like mine, you really won't have any great desire for food you shouldn't be eating.
    The sleeve is a long and periodically miserable journey. I am now 38 months post-op and I have maintained within 3 pounds of goal (above and below) for about 20 months, and within 3-4 pounds of goal for about 2 years now. There are days I eat things I shouldn't, but for the most part I don't care a whole lot about food anymore. I weigh myself everyday and when I find that my weight is creeping up again, I go back to being more strict with my diet. Right now you don't have the value of hindsight, so I'll give you mine. For every bit of misery that the first few weeks- months caused, every single second was worth it. I remember sobbing to my best friend the first week that I had ruined my life. I spent most of years 2-3 puking everytime I tried to eat anything that wasn't a dry carb, and I still can't eat a bunch of stuff without getting sick. I look at my scars from plastic surgery and sometimes I feel ashamed. I look at cake and Cookies and sometimes miss my old friends. I then go put on my size 2 jeans and my xs shirt and I smile....because in the end, all of the feeling of missing out on something and being sick and tired and hungry, it all pays off.
    You can do this. Time passes no matter what you do, so as long as you keep putting one foot in front of the other, handle every day as it comes, and use your past mistakes as ways to learn and do better in the future, soon enough you will realize that your life goes back to normal, except it's a new normal where you are healthy, happy, and when you can look back on this point and realize that all of the misery now was worth the future, which at some point will be your present.
  19. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Bella2126 in Please tell me day 4 is better then day 2!   
    I was ungodly sick on day 2 and by day 4 I just felt like a zombie. For the most part, you continue to feel better each day and a few months from now you will barely remember the misery of right now.
  20. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Katrina Nedby in 6 days post op and screwed up bad...   
    When I saw your post and that it was in the trending section I had an idea of how it was going to go and I thought...ahh poor person who thought it was a good idea to post here about blowing their post-op liquid diet. I hope you have thick skin.
    I like to comment on all of the posts about screwing up the diets that everyone else followed religiously and never messed up, because I am generally a big proponent of doing what works for you, which is often directly against what the literature says you should be doing. My stipulation though is that rules can be bent a smidge at the phase when you're almost done with soft foods, and flat out broken at some point beyond the two month mark where you can't actually hurt yourself by eating anything, but just won't really do yourself any favors. In the first weeks after surgery, even I, the person who most heavily advocates for making informed decisions that don't always align with doctor's orders, tend to say to stick with the plan you are given because it does actually impact your health and safety.
    That being said...clearly you know you made a mistake and since you've been commenting in here, you're doing just fine. Your mistake didn't hurt you this time, and so use this as a learning experience and move forward. We all screw up, but those of us who have maintained weight loss successfully know that when you fall off the wagon, you just have to get right back up. For the next few weeks, you aren't going to feel great, you will want normal food, and you are going to be cranky. It really does get better from here though and soon enough you will be back at a point where you can eat whatever you want (in small portions) and if your experience is like mine, you really won't have any great desire for food you shouldn't be eating.
    The sleeve is a long and periodically miserable journey. I am now 38 months post-op and I have maintained within 3 pounds of goal (above and below) for about 20 months, and within 3-4 pounds of goal for about 2 years now. There are days I eat things I shouldn't, but for the most part I don't care a whole lot about food anymore. I weigh myself everyday and when I find that my weight is creeping up again, I go back to being more strict with my diet. Right now you don't have the value of hindsight, so I'll give you mine. For every bit of misery that the first few weeks- months caused, every single second was worth it. I remember sobbing to my best friend the first week that I had ruined my life. I spent most of years 2-3 puking everytime I tried to eat anything that wasn't a dry carb, and I still can't eat a bunch of stuff without getting sick. I look at my scars from plastic surgery and sometimes I feel ashamed. I look at cake and Cookies and sometimes miss my old friends. I then go put on my size 2 jeans and my xs shirt and I smile....because in the end, all of the feeling of missing out on something and being sick and tired and hungry, it all pays off.
    You can do this. Time passes no matter what you do, so as long as you keep putting one foot in front of the other, handle every day as it comes, and use your past mistakes as ways to learn and do better in the future, soon enough you will realize that your life goes back to normal, except it's a new normal where you are healthy, happy, and when you can look back on this point and realize that all of the misery now was worth the future, which at some point will be your present.
  21. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Bella2126 in Please tell me day 4 is better then day 2!   
    I was ungodly sick on day 2 and by day 4 I just felt like a zombie. For the most part, you continue to feel better each day and a few months from now you will barely remember the misery of right now.
  22. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from NewChiGirl in The Easy Way Out   
    I told no one that I had surgery until a week after surgery, at which point I told my three best friends. I am now at 2.5 years post-op and those three people are the only people who know. You will absolutely have people who tell you that you are taking the easy way out, who make comments about what you're eating, and who, God forbid, if you lose weight and gain a bit back, will tell you how they were right all along that you took the easy way out and look, you failed.
    There is nothing wrong with perpetuating the fairy tale- it is your life and who you tell or don't tell is your business. I have never once regretted not telling people and I am 100% certain that the snide comments about how I had bariatric surgery would have bothered me and continued to be something people bring up, well past the point I am now which is at 11 months of maintenance at goal. People are jerks and they will 100% say stupid things and hurt your feelings if you make your decision public. If you're fine with that, then good for you, but if you're not, there is no reason in the world that you owe anyone an explanation other than diet and exercise, because ultimately if you don't diet and exercise the sleeve won't work anyway, so it's hardly as if you're lying.
  23. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Hammer_Down in Veterans   
    I'm 3 years and two months post-op. I'm very happy with my decision. I still have decent restriction, although part of the reason I am able to stay at goal is because my stomach doesn't have much of a tolerance for cheese, dairy, oil, butter, sugar, or most junk food, which is helpful. I must weigh everyday because if I don't pay attention it's easy to start gaining. I've been within 5 pounds of goal now for 2 years, and I've been at or beneath goal for about 19 months. I had lost weight plenty of times before, but prior to the sleeve I would never be able to keep it off. Now, I can't eat as much, I don't really have any great urge to eat a lot, and I don't have an emotional relationship with food.
    As I've moved to the third year, I notice that I have to be very careful with sugar. I can, for the most part, eat what I want to because I eat such small servings, but almost any form of good sugar (cake, Cookies, frappucinos) makes me gain weight almost instantly. I've been consistently around 129-131, except for last year around this time I woke up at 137 on November 1 and it took me until January to get back to 130. This past August I dropped to 126 for awhile, but I am now back up to floating between 130-134. The last 2-3 weeks I've been extra cautious of how I've been eating because I've been drinking more sugary energy drinks and this is quickly reflected on the scale. Generally though when I get to the top of my allowed weight (133-134ish) I start logging all of my food again and within a few days I drop right back down to 130-132. The key in the long run is to understand that you don't get to be normal. You don't get to be blissfully unaware of the scale, to eat whatever you want, and to stay think without remembering every single day that you need to watch what you are eating. There are still days where I wake up, weigh myself, get mad, and kick the scale...which then results in a hurt foot and makes me more mad. The trick is though that I do the same thing the next morning- I get up and I weigh myself and I write it down in my calendar. I can then go back and see that my weight does fluctuate and I'm always able to get it back down to normal. You have to stay vigilant or it is VERY easy to gain it all back.
    Getting the sleeve was the best decision I have made as it relates to my health, dieting, and my happiness. It does not though make me healthy or make me happy- it just gives me a little bit of help and how I choose to use it is really what determines success.
  24. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Bella2126 in Please tell me day 4 is better then day 2!   
    I was ungodly sick on day 2 and by day 4 I just felt like a zombie. For the most part, you continue to feel better each day and a few months from now you will barely remember the misery of right now.
  25. Like
    AvaFern got a reaction from Hammer_Down in Veterans   
    I'm 3 years and two months post-op. I'm very happy with my decision. I still have decent restriction, although part of the reason I am able to stay at goal is because my stomach doesn't have much of a tolerance for cheese, dairy, oil, butter, sugar, or most junk food, which is helpful. I must weigh everyday because if I don't pay attention it's easy to start gaining. I've been within 5 pounds of goal now for 2 years, and I've been at or beneath goal for about 19 months. I had lost weight plenty of times before, but prior to the sleeve I would never be able to keep it off. Now, I can't eat as much, I don't really have any great urge to eat a lot, and I don't have an emotional relationship with food.
    As I've moved to the third year, I notice that I have to be very careful with sugar. I can, for the most part, eat what I want to because I eat such small servings, but almost any form of good sugar (cake, Cookies, frappucinos) makes me gain weight almost instantly. I've been consistently around 129-131, except for last year around this time I woke up at 137 on November 1 and it took me until January to get back to 130. This past August I dropped to 126 for awhile, but I am now back up to floating between 130-134. The last 2-3 weeks I've been extra cautious of how I've been eating because I've been drinking more sugary energy drinks and this is quickly reflected on the scale. Generally though when I get to the top of my allowed weight (133-134ish) I start logging all of my food again and within a few days I drop right back down to 130-132. The key in the long run is to understand that you don't get to be normal. You don't get to be blissfully unaware of the scale, to eat whatever you want, and to stay think without remembering every single day that you need to watch what you are eating. There are still days where I wake up, weigh myself, get mad, and kick the scale...which then results in a hurt foot and makes me more mad. The trick is though that I do the same thing the next morning- I get up and I weigh myself and I write it down in my calendar. I can then go back and see that my weight does fluctuate and I'm always able to get it back down to normal. You have to stay vigilant or it is VERY easy to gain it all back.
    Getting the sleeve was the best decision I have made as it relates to my health, dieting, and my happiness. It does not though make me healthy or make me happy- it just gives me a little bit of help and how I choose to use it is really what determines success.
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