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The Binder is SCREAMING At Me! LOL!



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Well, since surgery is on Wednesday, I figured it was a good time to review my post-op diet binder since I'll be doing my grocery shopping this weekend. This is the first time since I really looked thru it since meeting with the dietician (I only met with her once and that was just last week - my surgery was scheduled an hour after I met with her). What stood out to me is that much of the instruction is in CAPS, BOLD, UNDERLINED, and seems to be yelling at me/the patient. I totally understand that a point is trying to be made, but I would have appreciated someone maybe explaining to me why these things were so important, rather than just "yelling" at me about them on paper. My situation is a bit different as I don't have a food addiction, I'm not an overeater, I'm not an unhealthy eater, etc. Long story short, I gained an insane amount of weight during pregnancy due to an undiagnosed chronic illness and have been physically unable to exercise (to a beneficial degree) for many years. It was eventually decided that I should have surgery to get the weight off and once the weight is off, I should have more energy and can hopefully get back to a more active lifestyle. So, my question is, with regards to all the "sugar-free, fat-free, no carbonated drinks, no alcohol, no bread, no Pasta, no rice, no butter, etc." is that because they are poor food choices or because they can actually cause damage to your new stomach? I know sugar can cause dumping syndrome in folks that get bypass, but I'm having the sleeve and was told that's not an issue. Thankfully I don't have much of a sweet tooth, so it's not really an issue, but to NEVER be able to have any sugar ever again? Ugh.... I'm also a little confused about why they're so hellbent on patients only drinking certain Protein Drinks (they only allow two premade shakes - all others are milk mixed with powder). When I went thru the program at another hospital (but decided to change surgeons before the actual surgery) they were much more flexible on Protein drinks, the pre-op diet was totally different, the post-op diet was a bit different, stages/timing of "new foods" post-op is different... I'm just trying to figure out why there are so many differences between programs, and why this new hospital seems so unbelievably strict (again, with the "yelling" and inflexibility in their program). Any insight would be great. I'm so looking forward to getting this over with. The anxiety leading up to this I think is worse than the surgery itself! LOL!

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I know things effect the body differently. For me sugar is a no no but I have had a little and I was super buzzed from it. The bread needs to be toasted. I believe it's because the soft stuff can block the stoma. However my aunt had the vsg also and she eats whatever but she is 2 years out. The carbonated drinks make air bubbles in the stomach and that can be really bad to have extra air in such a small place. I am no expert but i did talk to a young lady that kept drinking soda after her vsg and sh said she gained almost all her weight back it had been 4 years since her surgery.
IDK if this helps you but good luck.

hw 417
sw 351
cw 333
gw 175 cross fingers :)

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Dumping syndrome can happen to anyone after having any type of bariatric surgery. Pasta, rice, and noodles and bread all have sugar in then so the suggestion is to eat minimally. They are carbs.

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2 minutes ago, Shell4451 said:

Dumping syndrome can happen to anyone after having any type of bariatric surgery. Pasta, rice, and noodles and bread all have sugar in then so the suggestion is to eat minimally. They are carbs.

Interesting about the sugar/dumping as I specifically asked about this. I was originally going to have RnY, but changed to VSG when I decided to change surgeons. I asked the dietician about the sugar thing and she specifically said it was not an issue for VSG patients. I'll still avoid it as I'm well aware how awful dumping syndrome can be. Thanks for the head's up.

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Either way, sugar is not good. LOL
Sorry if the information i have is different from what you heard.

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3 hours ago, LAJ23 said:

So, my question is, with regards to all the "sugar-free, fat-free, no carbonated drinks, no alcohol, no bread, no Pasta, no rice, no butter, etc." is that because they are poor food choices or because they can actually cause damage to your new stomach?

Generally, the prohibitions against sugar-free, fat-free, no carbonation, etc, etc. is because these are highly caloric foods that people tend to overeat. If you are trying to lose weight, for whatever reason, you should avoid them. There is very little you could do that could cause damage to your new stomach without causing you extreme pain. Taking NSAIDS and extreme overeating before your staple line has healed are two that I can think of off the top of my head. After I reached goal, I added the "bad" foods back in small amounts, but my sleeve was picky. I could not eat bread, or bready things like cake or muffins, they balled up inside, absorbed Fluid, and hurt. Rice did the same. Oddly enough, toast is fine with me, as are Cookies. Ice cream did not feel good in my sleeve. Carbonated drinks felt funny too, but I like root beer so I would have one every so often. However, I could and did drink the occasional glass of wine, I ate butter, and Pasta. Mostly I liked Protein with starches, or stir-frys with a spicy sauce, and fruit. Really, once you are at goal you can eat what you like as long as you are burning the same number of calories as you take in.

As for the differences in shake requirements between programs, that's just them. The staff get used to a certain regimen and it's easier for them to answer questions if they know everybody's doing mostly the same stuff.

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13 hours ago, LAJ23 said:

\regards to all the "sugar-free, fat-free, no carbonated drinks, no alcohol, no bread, no Pasta, no rice, no butter, etc." is that because they are poor food choices or because they can actually cause damage to your new stomach? I know sugar can cause dumping syndrome in folks that get bypass, but I'm having the sleeve and was told that's not an issue. Thankfully I don't have much of a sweet tooth, so it's not really an issue, but to NEVER be able to have any sugar ever again? Ugh.... I'm also a little confused about why they're so hellbent on patients only drinking certain Protein Drinks (they only allow two premade shakes - all others are milk mixed with powder). When I went thru the program at another hospital (but decided to change surgeons before the actual surgery) they were much more flexible on Protein drinks, the pre-op diet was totally different, the post-op diet was a bit different, stages/timing of "new foods" post-op is different... I'm just trying to figure out why there are so many differences between programs, and why this new hospital seems so unbelievably strict (again, with the "yelling" and inflexibility in their program). Any insight would be great. I'm so looking forward to getting this over with. The anxiety leading up to this I think is worse than the surgery itself! LOL!

Alcohol can cause damage to the new, sensible stomach. In most programs there is a 3 or 6 month abstinence from alcohol with a recommendation to leave it for life. Few thing really upsets me that much as when a WLS patients asks in a forum about if they can have a drink at 1 month out (or something like that) because it is their birthday or they are going to an event or what not, and then someone says "try it". NO, you actually cannot. We cannot in all good consciousness tell people it is ok to have a drink at 1-2-3-4 months out when the doctors, the ones that work with this says no. Worst case scenario is that you die. That is the reality. Best case scenario you get an upset stomach and get unbelievably drunk. Why risk it, alcohol is not that good. The stomach needs to heal, and the alcohol "tears" on the stomach lining.

Sure, it is utopia that a WLS patient never gets a drink again. That probably won't happen unless you are like me, that didn't actually drink alcohol before surgery because I think it is actually a taste of horrendous, and I will probably never have more than a sip of it again. But, most social gatherings are often based around either alcohol or food, or both - so I get the issues. There are some main issues with drinking alcohol after wls:

  1. - We can't handle it that good. You'll be a very cheap date on this. One drink might get you all the way gazeboed. So if you expect to have the same treshold as before, that is not going to happen. Your own safety on this is also in risk since you don't know your body + alcohol anymore, so it is recommended that if you must drink, do it at home the first times among people you trust to get to know how your body responds to it. I don't know about you, but the 2-3 times I drank myself under the table in my life before WLS, my legs malfunctioned. In the sense that they spread to some men far out of my taste.
  2. Alcohol is empty calories. One glass of wine is around 100cals, and one beer is 300cals. You are on a calorie budget and if you spend them on alcohol it affects your other spending's - good food. Once in a while will not hurt, but when it is every day, one beer adds up to 2100,- calories, that is 2-3 days worth of food for you. And then there is sugar etc.
  3. WLS patients tends to replace the food addiction with other addictions. For me fx, I now drink tons of redbull and energy drinks instead of coca cola and fastfoods. I also take benzos which makes me high on the regular. Many want to see me cross eyed when I am hones about this, but I think it is important to be honest, and to let others that have developed a new addiction that it is common to do so. Unfortunately the food addiction turns out to be replaced by alcohol abuse in very many cases.
    https://www.bariatricservices.eu/drinking-alcohol-after-bariatric-surgery/
  4. There is a lot of misconceptions about carbonated drinks. It does not expand your new stomach since the elastic part of it has been taken out. But it interferes with the subtile signs of feeling full and satisfied. What ones sees is that bariatric patients that continue to drink lots of carbonation gain more weight because they eat more since the signal of being full is disturbed.
  5. bread is heavy to swallow. Like literally. It clumps up and makes you feel stuffed and sick. It also offers little nutrition in terms of what calories you spend on it vs what you get in return. Some people eat bread, some don't. For a bari-stomach half-white bread seems to be better than heavy grains. Toasted is better than not toasted etc. Some eat zero carb bread etc. I think personally it is better to slab some cheese and ham on a salad leaf. More nutrients, less calories, keeps me filled and I don't get that feeling of the bread "clumping" up inside me.
  6. Pasta is not healthy. Empty calories. It also clumps up inside you. If you must, try eating veggie-pasta or bean-pasta, make zuccini noodles etc. Worth noting that bot bread and pasta can cause you pain.
  7. Same goes for rice - it is granted not as empty calories as pasta, but still just carbs. And it expands in you.
  8. I eat butter. I shouldn't because I have an inflamed gallbladder, but I do. I never touch margarine or vegetable fat, highly processed things that cause inflammation in it self. Either butter or coconut oil. Your stomach might have a hard time with the fat, but in my opinion butter is way better than some processed **** and vegetable oils etc. Just keep in mind that 10 grams of butter is close to 100 calories. Try measuring it up and see how little 10 grams is. Also you might respond poor to high fat products. I bought an airfryer, so I hardly ever use butter anymore. If I have a loaf of some breadish things I usually use spread low fat cheese instead of butter on it. FX skinny cheese, ham and cheese.
  9. Protein is protein and should be your main focus to get in the first 2-3 months. They want you to drink shakes because you probably won't eat adequate of protein. I did not drink a single Protein Shake because I hate hate hate the taste (other than some lemonade type protein shakes). The reason why they want you to use a specific kind is either because they get commission from the producer of the shake, or because the shake is a better option compared to the commercial ones that are just garbage put in a bag. Most of the time it is about money.
  10. Programs are often surgeon preference. I did not have a strict pre-op diet fx. I only had to loose some pounds. It upsets me when surgeons make their patients live of liquids for 3 weeks prior. It is hard AF, and you have to live on it for 2-4 weeks after as well. I think that was enough - smoothies and Soups are not welcome in my house😂.



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I'd follow your plan for now. But, I'm almost two years out and I eat small portions of many of the things on the "bad" list once in a while except for carbonated beverages, which happily, I don't really like.

When I was about to get my surgery I asked my dietician, "So no tortellini again?" :( And she said it had Protein and a small portion once in a while was OK.

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16 hours ago, LAJ23 said:

Well, since surgery is on Wednesday, I figured it was a good time to review my post-op diet binder since I'll be doing my grocery shopping this weekend. This is the first time since I really looked thru it since meeting with the dietician (I only met with her once and that was just last week - my surgery was scheduled an hour after I met with her). What stood out to me is that much of the instruction is in CAPS, BOLD, UNDERLINED, and seems to be yelling at me/the patient. I totally understand that a point is trying to be made, but I would have appreciated someone maybe explaining to me why these things were so important, rather than just "yelling" at me about them on paper. My situation is a bit different as I don't have a food addiction, I'm not an overeater, I'm not an unhealthy eater, etc. Long story short, I gained an insane amount of weight during pregnancy due to an undiagnosed chronic illness and have been physically unable to exercise (to a beneficial degree) for many years. It was eventually decided that I should have surgery to get the weight off and once the weight is off, I should have more energy and can hopefully get back to a more active lifestyle. So, my question is, with regards to all the "sugar-free, fat-free, no carbonated drinks, no alcohol, no bread, no Pasta, no rice, no butter, etc." is that because they are poor food choices or because they can actually cause damage to your new stomach? I know sugar can cause dumping syndrome in folks that get bypass, but I'm having the sleeve and was told that's not an issue. Thankfully I don't have much of a sweet tooth, so it's not really an issue, but to NEVER be able to have any sugar ever again? Ugh.... I'm also a little confused about why they're so hellbent on patients only drinking certain Protein Drinks (they only allow two premade shakes - all others are milk mixed with powder). When I went thru the program at another hospital (but decided to change surgeons before the actual surgery) they were much more flexible on Protein drinks, the pre-op diet was totally different, the post-op diet was a bit different, stages/timing of "new foods" post-op is different... I'm just trying to figure out why there are so many differences between programs, and why this new hospital seems so unbelievably strict (again, with the "yelling" and inflexibility in their program). Any insight would be great. I'm so looking forward to getting this over with. The anxiety leading up to this I think is worse than the surgery itself! LOL!

First, let’s be clear, not everyone is here because they have an addiction to food. Obesity is caused by several different factors, one of which you mentioned but let me remind you of the others; genetics, age, race, endocrine situation, neurological disorders, stress, lack of activity, and calorie intake with respect to activity due to short or long-term lack of mobility.

The binder, like the surgery is a tool designed to help us, not offend. I think the dietician’s do a hell of a job trying to present the information in a way thats beneficial for everyone and perhaps no specific for each individual. That’s where you come in. I too only had one appointment with my dietician, but I’ve exchanged emails, and she urges me to continue to reach out if I have any questions or need clarification or additional recommendation. Your situation may qualify for certain accommodations, and less restrictions, but instead of complaining express your concerns to the people that will be helping you in your journey, and know your unique health situation.

Also, give your Bariatrics center the feedback on the perceived tone of nutrition information in your binder. Like everything else in the world, change for the better comes after you are able to look at things through a different lens.

Wishing you the best.

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21 hours ago, LAJ23 said:

Well, since surgery is on Wednesday, I figured it was a good time to review my post-op diet binder since I'll be doing my grocery shopping this weekend. This is the first time since I really looked thru it since meeting with the dietician (I only met with her once and that was just last week - my surgery was scheduled an hour after I met with her). What stood out to me is that much of the instruction is in CAPS, BOLD, UNDERLINED, and seems to be yelling at me/the patient. I totally understand that a point is trying to be made, but I would have appreciated someone maybe explaining to me why these things were so important, rather than just "yelling" at me about them on paper. My situation is a bit different as I don't have a food addiction, I'm not an overeater, I'm not an unhealthy eater, etc. Long story short, I gained an insane amount of weight during pregnancy due to an undiagnosed chronic illness and have been physically unable to exercise (to a beneficial degree) for many years. It was eventually decided that I should have surgery to get the weight off and once the weight is off, I should have more energy and can hopefully get back to a more active lifestyle. So, my question is, with regards to all the "sugar-free, fat-free, no carbonated drinks, no alcohol, no bread, no Pasta, no rice, no butter, etc." is that because they are poor food choices or because they can actually cause damage to your new stomach? I know sugar can cause dumping syndrome in folks that get bypass, but I'm having the sleeve and was told that's not an issue. Thankfully I don't have much of a sweet tooth, so it's not really an issue, but to NEVER be able to have any sugar ever again? Ugh.... I'm also a little confused about why they're so hellbent on patients only drinking certain Protein Drinks (they only allow two premade shakes - all others are milk mixed with powder). When I went thru the program at another hospital (but decided to change surgeons before the actual surgery) they were much more flexible on Protein drinks, the pre-op diet was totally different, the post-op diet was a bit different, stages/timing of "new foods" post-op is different... I'm just trying to figure out why there are so many differences between programs, and why this new hospital seems so unbelievably strict (again, with the "yelling" and inflexibility in their program). Any insight would be great. I'm so looking forward to getting this over with. The anxiety leading up to this I think is worse than the surgery itself! LOL!

People have denial to varying degrees here. Being fat is caused by what you choose to put in you mouth on a daily basis, its around 90% diet. We all have to take some self responsibility for our fatness. That said the font type is some minor detail the important part is that you really take it to heart. When designing the program bulleting items or bolding them helps many patients to know what is important. Older low vision people are also reading the same paperwork. Paperwork is not a chatroom where “one can yell”

if you feel like the staff are yelling at you on other hand in person then find another program. Some have nicer staff!

this is a major surgery. The surgeons probably try to keep their program as standard as possible incase of complication they will know the context (how the client was to be eating etc) if its all standard. Again if you don't like one surgeons rules there are many to choose from so that you can get one who has more similar ideas to how you want to live and behave after surgery

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Well, since surgery is on Wednesday, I figured it was a good time to review my post-op diet binder since I'll be doing my grocery shopping this weekend. This is the first time since I really looked thru it since meeting with the dietician (I only met with her once and that was just last week - my surgery was scheduled an hour after I met with her). What stood out to me is that much of the instruction is in CAPS, BOLD, UNDERLINED, and seems to be yelling at me/the patient. I totally understand that a point is trying to be made, but I would have appreciated someone maybe explaining to me why these things were so important, rather than just "yelling" at me about them on paper. My situation is a bit different as I don't have a food addiction, I'm not an overeater, I'm not an unhealthy eater, etc. Long story short, I gained an insane amount of weight during pregnancy due to an undiagnosed chronic illness and have been physically unable to exercise (to a beneficial degree) for many years. It was eventually decided that I should have surgery to get the weight off and once the weight is off, I should have more energy and can hopefully get back to a more active lifestyle. So, my question is, with regards to all the "sugar-free, fat-free, no carbonated drinks, no alcohol, no bread, no Pasta, no rice, no butter, etc." is that because they are poor food choices or because they can actually cause damage to your new stomach? I know sugar can cause dumping syndrome in folks that get bypass, but I'm having the sleeve and was told that's not an issue. Thankfully I don't have much of a sweet tooth, so it's not really an issue, but to NEVER be able to have any sugar ever again? Ugh.... I'm also a little confused about why they're so hellbent on patients only drinking certain Protein Drinks (they only allow two premade shakes - all others are milk mixed with powder). When I went thru the program at another hospital (but decided to change surgeons before the actual surgery) they were much more flexible on Protein drinks, the pre-op diet was totally different, the post-op diet was a bit different, stages/timing of "new foods" post-op is different... I'm just trying to figure out why there are so many differences between programs, and why this new hospital seems so unbelievably strict (again, with the "yelling" and inflexibility in their program). Any insight would be great. I'm so looking forward to getting this over with. The anxiety leading up to this I think is worse than the surgery itself! LOL!

Some surgeons have their "wants" I had to deal with the fact t that I'm vegan. The were understanding and we've had to discuss that along of the pre and post op diet criteria didn't match my diet. We made a plan that works. Even in the hospital they brought me a milk laden Protein beverage, even though they know I'm vegan and lactose intolerant. I had my mom bring my Protein Powder from home and all was well. You just need to talk with the dietician and work things out

Eddy Blaine Brown II

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