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SteveT74

Gastric Sleeve Patients
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Everything posted by SteveT74

  1. SteveT74

    December 2018 Sleevers!

    Hey guys. Just checking in on my fellow December 2018 sleavers. I am chugging along on my weight loss journey. I am down. I was a low BMI patient so I lost most of my excess weight in the first 2.5 months post-op. Since the end of March, it's been slow going with the scale. I have only lost about 7 pounds since March 7, but I did lose about 1.5% off my body fat 1.5" off my waist since. I am pretty happy with where things are at the moment. I would like to lose another 5-10 pounds--but that would only be to give me a little cushion against regain (maybe?). I still have a healthy appetite, but nothing like I did before surgery. That said, I probably eat more than most bariatric patients at this point--but I am very careful about what I eat. I don't cheat at all--not even a little bit. Yesterday was a tough challenge. My daughter had her 8th birthday party yesterday and we served pizza and an ice cream cake from cold stone creamery (dark chocolate fudge and salted caramel ice cream with angel food cake. I realize that it's very easy to fall off the wagon--it's how ended up starting to regain after every diet I was on before in my life. I can't have "just a little bite of this" or "a taste of that". Sure, I could a few times, but one little bite can become just a little piece and escalates from there. Even though I am thin and in really good shape right now, I am never going to be a "thin person" like someone that is naturally thin his/her whole life. The potential for me to become heavy again is always going to be there. So, I am going to always have to be that much stricter with my diet and exercise. So, I came up with a plan to deal with my daughter's party. First, I made sure to eat before her party something healthy (salad with grilled chicken and bolthouse low carb/low cal dressing) and I promised myself a yummy snack after the party (pumpkin seeds, pecans and a piece of ChocZero dark chocolate (very yummy)). It may not be as exciting as ice cream cake, but it's still yummy to me. I was able to get through the party without taking even the tiniest bite of anything. You have to have a plan and stick with it to make this process successful. As an added bonus, I felt no guilt today.
  2. SteveT74

    December 2018 Sleevers!

    Are you guys sure you are stalled? The scale is just a convenient tool for judging progress since water weight, time of the month etc. can greatly effect your weight on the scale. You'd be much better of combining your weigh ins with body measurements (hips, thighs, waist, chest) and body fat percentage (either with a bio-impedence scale or get an omicron handheld body fat monitor [preferable]). If I was just going by what the scale said, I would think I am in the world's longest bariatric stall. I have only lost 7 pounds in the last 8 week, but I lost 3.5" off my waist, 1.5" off my chest and my body fat is down 18% since surgery (on 12/17). None of that shows up on the scale, but this is more important than what the scale says. If you're losing muscle mass, what good is the weight loss. OP, if you aren't getting exercise daily and you are straying from your diet plan---now is the time to get back on track. The surgery isn't going to get you to onederland on its own.
  3. I was blessed to not suffer from obesity as a kid or even as an adult in my 20's. In fact, I worked as a personal trainer through college and part of law school and was in great shape in my early to mid twenties. I had a few mild ups and downs with the scale (gained 15-20 extra pounds) in my late twenties, but got back into shape and kept the weight off for a few years. It wasn't until I reach my early thirties (after I got married) that the weight started to accumulate. I didn't notice it in the mirror. I would gain 10 pounds take it off, regain 12 pounds take ten off, regain 14 pounds take 5 off---you know the pattern. The swings got to the point where I would drop 30 and regain 45. Low and behold, I got up to probably got up to around 270 (don't really know my true HW). Regardless of what the numbers on the scale said, I never saw myself as "obese"--not the guy in the mirror or the guy. In my dreams, I was always I my 20's, in great shape and super healthy. Waking up was always a big disappointment. I had my VSG in December 2018 and I have dropped about 75 pounds since my highest "measured" weight. Although I am now 45, I am almost back to the weight I was 20 years ago and the shape I was in too. Ironically, when I dream at night, I am now the fat version of me from the past 5 or so years. I actually have this reoccurring dream where I am standing next to my refrigerator stuffing my face as quickly as I can, when I hear my wife coming down the stairs. I start to panic to get the food back in the fridge to hide my binge eating from her. I am embarrassed by my behavior and disgusted with myself in these dreams. They cause me to wake up in a panic only to realize it's just a dream and I didn't gain the weight or start binge eating again. It's an awful feeling--almost as awful as waking up from a dream where I am thin only to find that the real me is morbidly obese. Maybe when I had dreams when I was fat about being skinny, it was my subconscious trying to remind me of the guy I was and am still meant to be. Maybe these new dreams are are my subconscious warning to myself about the possibility of what could happen to me if I don't stick to the plan. I would like to think these dreams are more than just an example of how I can torture myself and induce anxiety. Has anyone else had these types of dreams and experiences???
  4. SteveT74

    Carbs?

    I am not sure what you mean about assumptions. While there may be many ways to WL and more than one healthy dietary approach (points I fully agree with), you're making assumptions when you say her nutritionist is satisfied. That's not what I am reading. She says her nutritionist wants her to get her calories up, but not push herself since we know how that can go. Moreover, I am not making far out assumption about OP's diet. She gives us the ino. OP said she's eating 5-600 calories and she's set goals of 70g protein, 20-30 grams fat and 20 grams of net carbs. It doesn't sound like she's consistently hitting those goals if she's still under 600 calories, but I am going to assume she is for purposes of this response that she is hitting hose goals. If she hits those goals, she's eating 280 calories from protein per day, 80 calories from carbs and a max of 270 calories from fat--which adds up to 680 calories a day (although she says she's eating less than that), Based on this information, her macros are 41% protein, 39.5% fat (best case scenario) and 11.7% carbs. If she's at or under 600 calories a day, she's not actually hitting these goals and if her emphasis is on protein-- the balance is going to be heavier on protein and even lighter on carbs and fat. With such low calorie consumption, her present diet is likely not providing her with sufficient micronutrients in the long term. So, I am suggesting that if she is so restricted (bless her for that) it's hard to eat more calories in bulk that she is presently consuming, she can get her calories up by consuming foods that have healthy dense fats--like a handful or two of nuts a day that are high in healthy fats and protein. You don't need to eat a lot of nuts to get a lot of quality calories. This will get her where her nutritionist wants and will be manageable with a tight stomach. It will also help her in the long run potentially avoid some of the nutritional pitfalls that could happen (like hair loss and other more significant issues). I respect you a lot SillyKitty and love your posts, but don't think your reprimand--soft as it may have been--was warranted. her nutritionist would like to see her get the calorie consumption up. Moreover, the info I was providing isn't based on assumption, it's based on science. OP can continue to stick to this type of diet and be ok in the short term, but it's not ideal. If she's meeting her protein numbers (which I assume she is--so, yeah, that's one assumption), she's consuming at least 300 calories in protein. If she is specifically trying to go low carb and low fat on 600 calories a day, you're I would reasonably assume her actual protein intake is more than needed to meet her surgeon's minimum. At this calorie consumption rate, you're looking at macros that 70% plus in protein. If that's the case, she doesn't need to necessarily cut down on her protein, but those macros should be balanced out a bit or there will be nutritional deficiencies. I am sure that's what her nutritionist is concerned about in the long term. Short term (say over a 5 or 6 month period), this might be ok. However, since she had surgery on
  5. Congrats on the new baby!!! That's a wonderful thing, even if the timing isn't as ideal as your doctors might have preferred (hey, **** happens, right???). In the end, there is nothing more important that children and being good mommies and daddies--which also means we need to be taking good care of ourselves. I am sure you've heard this all before, but you really need to work closely with your surgical team, Ob-Gyn and your nutritionist during this pregnancy. It's going to be a big challenge for your to get in the calories you need for your growing baby and to keep your weight down so after you have your little one, you don't have an extra 30-40 pounds to lose. You can do it--but it's going to require a lot of extra work on your part. You can still exercise your @ss off during the pregnancy and sticky to a healthy diet created by your medical team (really stick to it!!). It will all work out well in the end! It's going to great if you put in the effort!!
  6. Seriously, could you be more of a d**k? Save your judgment for yourself.
  7. Hey, you can go to the gym before your one month post-op visit when you feel up to it. You can't weight train of course, but you can certainly do cardio. You start of light--elliptical or treadmill. If you're up to it after a few days, you can take a spin class or increase the intensity on the elliptical or treadmill. Since it's cold where I live, walking outside wasn't an option when I had surgery in December 2018. The gym was my saving grace---pacing around the house just wasn't working for me. Congrats and you'll do great!!!
  8. SteveT74

    Stall frustration....

    FYI, I just turned 45. I know that being a 45 year old guy trying to get back into shape has some unique challenges. We can't train the same way we did in our twenties, nor should you even try. What worked then, will not work now--not for the long term anyway. I am kicking my ass like you are. I am up around 4am to get to the gym by 4:30-4:34. I take a spin class five days a week (twice on Wednesdays). I then weight train intensively 5-6 days a week, mixing and matching supersets and drop sets. Focusing on compound lifts most days and then having one day of just isolation and "Big Lift Day" once a week when I do squats, deadlifts, barbell rows, bench press, kettle bell swings, lat pull and mix in pushups and rowing machine as part of a circuit. I keep the weight challenging but not max by any means. i have to focus on trying to perfect my form--I can't get way with sloppy form like I could 20 years ago. I always use a heart rate monitor so I make sure that I keep my bpm up into the high 130's low 140's on average. I'll spike in the 150's the end of a super set and then rest until my rate drops in the 120's and then start a new set (usually that means waiting 1minute to a 1:30 seconds). Forget what the scale says, I think just adding this one "Big Lift Day" into my routine really kicked my body into gear and got my muscle mass growing and definitely kicked up my testosterone a notch (which is great for getting rid of belly fat). If I didn't have extra skin around my mid-section from years of being obese, I would have a six pack now. August 2018: This week:
  9. Thanks for the support guys. I guess these types of dreams are fairly common occurrences. They never told us about these during those pre-op meetings and classes. I guess I am really happy where I am and where things are going that losing this would be just awful. Even when I lost weight in the past, in the back of my mind I knew it would eventually come back (since that's how it's always been for me as an adult). This has to be the time that it stays off!!! As bad as it was looking morbidly obese, the feeling of having no control over myself and feeling like crap all the the time. I had issues sleeping because breathing ward hard when I laid down. I would often sleep sitting up like a bear. Living with diabetes sucked in so many ways. I had issues with ED because of it (and the meds I took for it). I had gastroparesis due to neuropathy in my stomach. Heart disease. I was 44 and I felt like I was 70. Last year when I met with my cardiologist after my 44th birthday, he was really worried for me (not in that BS way that some doctors have when they feel obligated to read us the riot act). He was sweet as sugar but he told me that based on my blood work, stress test etc. and family history, if I don't make a major change right now I will probably have my first major heart attack in the next five years. I CAN'T ever live like that again!!!! I owe it to my wife and kids to be super healthy Dad--not fat dad that will be dead before they are in high school.
  10. SteveT74

    Carbs?

    If you're only eating 6 or 700 calories a day and almost all of that is coming from protein, it sounds like you're not eating enough calories to support a healthy nutritional balance. You're also eating so much protein that you're excluding important micronutrients. I am a big believer in going ultra-low carb (love Keto), but to cut out carbs AND fat is definitely going catch up with you. You can live without carbs (except for fiber, which we really need a lot of), but fats and protein are both essential. Protein is very important--particularly in the month or two after surgery when you're recovering since amino acids are required for tissue growth, neurological repair and growth, hair growth etc. However, you can't really live long term on protein alone. First off, your body will convert protein to glycogen to compensate for the reduction in available glucose that you might ordinarily get from carbs. Protein molecules can be converted to glucose by your liver in a process called glyconeogenesis. It's an inefficient way to create glucose--which is a good thing in most instances since it means that your body consumes about three time the amount of energy to create glucose from protein than it does from carbohydrates. However, this process also creates a lot of unpleasant by-products and waste that needs to be processed by your liver and kidneys. If this is your primary/only source of energy for a long enough period of time, your going to risk liver and kindney damage and possibly failure. This is one of the things your Surgeon is checking for when they do your blood work every three months (it shows up in your creatine, thiamine and protein level reports). This will tell him or her if you're eating to little or too much protein. Second, you need to have fats in your diet. I am not talking about cheese burgers and bacon. We can all live without that crap. However, healthy fats are very important for neurological function, heart health, liver function and hormone production etc. You need to also be eating the right kinds of fats from things like avocado, fatty fish oil (wild caught sockeye salmon), extra virgin olive oil, ghee etc, nuts (pecans, macadamia, brazil nuts--all great). These are all great sources of omega-6 fatty acids, which are also very important for your immune function and will help you suppress free radicals and mutations that can cause cancer and other health issues. Third, even though I am a Keto evangalist, you do need to some carbs in your diet. Those carbs need to come mostly in the form of fiber along with some nutrient rich foods that will help improve your micronutrient profile. Sure, we can take supplements but most of those pills only mimic the vitamins we would otherwise get through a healthy diet. There not one in the same. That said, 20 net grams of carbs is more than enough to live on---but your total carbs (including fiber and sugar alcohols does not require any limitation). Depending your choices though, you can certainly have more than 20 net grams of carbs and still be very healthy and lose lots of weight. You just have to monitor your calories a little more carefully. Finally, even with your tiny tummy, you can easily get your calorie (nutrient) consumption up to 1000 to 1200 a day if you add in fats. A small handful of brazil nuts, macadamia nuts, pumpkin seeds or pecans will get you plenty of healthy fat, protein and fiber to fuel you through the day. Sure, these are calorie dense foods, but if you can't eat food in quantity, you should still try to get your calorie consumption up near 1000k a day. It's not going to really change your rate of weight loss significantly (it might slow things a tiny bit), but it will help you prevent regain to get yourself to a point where you can eat a sustainable amount of calories daily. You don't want your body to adapt to 600 calories a day and base your new set point on maintenance at that level. That's not a recipe for long term success.
  11. SteveT74

    Low BMI Surgery

    I started the process with a BMI of 37.5 last April and I weighed in at 256 during my first bariatric consult. On the day of surgery (12/17/18), I weighed 234 and I had a BMI of 34.5. By New Years Eve, I was down to 224. On January 15, I was down to 212. By January 30, I was down to 204. On February 15, I was down to 197. On March 1, I weighed 196.7. March 15, I weighed 196.1. Today I weighed 193.2. So you can see that it came off fast and has leveled off. I have lost 2 inches off my waist since March 1, so the inches are coming off if the weight isn't. I follow a strict diet and exercise program--which is pretty intense, but I am really enjoying it. I feel awesome. Here's some photos documenting the journey. Last Summer this is me at 255 or so: This is me on Surgery Day (12/17/18) (weight: 234): This is me on January 17, 2019 (Weight: 210) This is me on February 28, 2019 (weight: 197.8) This is me on March 23, 2019 (Weight: 192.1): So, the weight loss has slowed up, but that's ok. I want to lose another 10-15 pounds, but I don't "need" to lose that weight. I am more concerned at this point with improving my physical conditioning and strength. The weight came off so fast that I didn't really "see" the difference in the mirror, but the photos show a dramatic change. I still hasn't really sunk in yet, but it's kind of like winning the health lottery. I am look healthy and fit. I am no longer diabetic according to my doctors. My BP is normal and my blood tests look great 3 months post op. Huge improvements. Honestly, having this surgery is the best thing I ever did for myself. I wish I had done this sooner--but better late than never. Obviously, the surgery helps get the ball rolling and gives you the tool so that the rest of the changes you make in your lifestyle will actually work for you. I have tried to do this before with hardcore dieting and exercise and I would just hit a wall and then lose ground. Not anymore!! If 191 is my wall, that's ok for me--but I think I'll still lose some more weight over the next few months, but the changes won't be as dramatic or noticeable (on the scale or otherwise).
  12. SteveT74

    December 2018 Sleevers!

    Fortunately, we have muscle memory, so the strength will come back quickly. Even if strength stalls your weight loss as far as the scale is concerned (there's a good chance it can), the results will be worth it. Losing weight is great, but being and feeling strong, fit and healthy is even better!
  13. Sounds like good advice to me, but I just don't know how to put this on auto-pilot. I am conscious of everything I eat, drink and the physical activity I need to do to get and stay in shape. I still only 3.5 months out from surgery, this healthy lifestyle and change in my body is very new. I guess I worry about slipping back into bad habits and I don't really trust myself unless I am being strict in following my rules (which are not entirely the same as my doctor's rules).
  14. SteveT74

    December 2018 Sleevers!

    Wow, you're down to 180???? That's amazing!!!! Good for you!!!! I know how you feel about the changes happening so fast. I am in the same position, although the scale is stuck around 191-194 for me--and has been for a while. I still want to drop at least 10 more pounds, but it's not going to be easy at this point. I have significantly improved my physical conditioning---cardio and strength in the past three months. Fortunately, my strength and conditioning continues to improve while the scale stays the same.
  15. SteveT74

    Drinking alcohol again????

    I had my VSG on 12/17 and I enjoyed a few drinks on New Year's Eve. I definitely got drunk, but still not as much as my wife who drank less than me. I had one vodka and soda with dinner this past weekend (out at a restaurant for my wife's b-day). It went down fine and I didn't feel anything from it--although I did nurse that drink for an hour. I am working so hard to get into shape and lose weight, why drink liquid calories that are just going to make it that much harder for me to stay on track?? I am sure I'll have drinks in the future, but I don't see myself drinking for the purpose of getting drunk any time soon. I will never say never, but it's just not something I want for myself right now. Same goes with weed. I have smoked a couple of times since surgery, but I really only took a couple of hits and I don't want to consume anything that is going to make me want to eat more.
  16. SteveT74

    Stall frustration....

    Hi there, First off, you can't compare your progress to others. The fact is, if you weren't training hard, you'd probably be losing more weight on the scale--but you wouldn't see it on your body the same way. The scale is BS-just an easy metric to track. You should be more focused on losing inches--which is really the whole point anyway. As long as that's happening (as you said), you're doing the right things. The weight loss on the scale will eventually catch up. Second, you may want to get a body fat monitor, like the handheld one that Omicron makes. I have only lost 3.5 pounds in the past month, but I lost 1.5 inches off my waist and 1.8% of my body fat. I don't consider that a stall by any means. If you want to experiment with increasing your calories or changing up your diet by cutting down on carbs or increasing the amount of healthy fat you're eating (something along those lines), you might give your body a little kickstart by confusing it. Bottom line is you lost 137 pounds since last June. That's f---ing amazing. That last few pounds are always going to be the hardest.
  17. SteveT74

    Carbs?

    The answer is both! First off, you don't count total carbs because the carbs that you eat in the form of fiber and sugar alcohols generally pass through undigested and don't contributed to weight gain or energy productiion. You have to deduct them from your total carb intake--so the focus is on net carbs. I am personally follow an ultra-low carb diet and try to keep my total carb intake under 30 net grams (usually under 20). I also count calories and track what I eat. I budget 1500 calories a day, with 45 percent come from protein, 45 percent from fat (healthy fats) andn 10% from carbs. It's working for me.
  18. SteveT74

    Non Scale Victories

    I have so many non-scale victories--which is fortunate since I only lost 3.5 pounds in the past month. I am, however, only 17 pounds from my goal weight (maybe I should just change my goal??). So, my non scale victories are as follows: 1. I went from wearing size 44 pants on December 1 to now wearing 32 pants! 2. One of the other kid's mom at my daughter's nursery that I used to talk to all the time saw me this past weekend and introduced herself as if she had never talked to me before. She didn't recognize me!! 4. I had to buy slim fit shirts and suits because standard fit is too loose around my waist. 5. My wife says I am not snoring anymore!! 6. I am no longer taking medication for T2DM, high blood pressure or high triglycerides, 7. My surgeon asked me if I would be willing to be in advertisement where I show my before and after and talk about how bariatric surgery changed my life (haven't decided if I want to do that though). 8. Most importantly, I feel great. I have loads of energy and I am not embarrassed of my appearance or being the fat guy in the room. I am actually looking forward to wearing a bathing suit this summer!! I feel like i didn't just lose weight, but like I turned the clock back 15 years. Even if I don't lose another pound, I am thrilled with the results. My only regret is not having had the surgery sooner.
  19. SteveT74

    10 months, is it over or a stall?

    Hi there, Congrats on doing a great job losing that weight. That's outstanding work. None of us are in a position to really know how much you're still capable of losing. However, given that you have already lost more than 70% of your excess pre-op body weight, it's fair to say that the days of rapid, seemingly effortless weight loss is over. You can still lose more and reach your goal weight, but it may take longer to lose the weight than in the beginning and it will probably require a lot more work on your part. The last 20 pounds is always the toughest. I am at that point too (although I am only 3.5 months out--but different situation). I am only 15 pounds away from my goal weight, but I only lost 3.5 pounds over the past month. It's better than nothing, but even losing that 3.5 pounds required hard work on my part (strictly following my diet and hitting the gym daily). You may need to go over your diet with your nutritionist to see if there is areas where you can improve. How much exercise are you getting each week?
  20. SteveT74

    December 2018 Sleevers!

    Lolo, I know I am preaching to the converted, but you know when you loose a lot of weight quickly you inevitably loose muscle along with the fat. The only way to counter that is strength training. I know you have been working out a lot, but if you're finding that you're really losing a lot of upper body strength you may need to reallocate your gym time to strength training even if it means less time on cardio--although when strength training is done right, it's a cardio workout too.
  21. SteveT74

    Keto diet question

    It's not that long. My doc had me eating solids in 4 weeks. I still follow all my doctor's instructions, but I choose to eat keto foods and skip the carbs. That said, my macros are not really keto because I am 45 percent of my calories come from protein. That's way too high for keto. I am more of an extreme low carb diet if I want to get technical. I am not consuming enough calories for a true therapeutic keto diet nor can I do intermittent fasting. However, my blood glucose levels are very stable now. I am never over 120 even after eating. I am generally under 100. My BP is normal. If I ever see adverse effects on my health, I would change my diet. So far so good though! Sent from my SM-G965U1 using Tapatalk
  22. SteveT74

    Keto diet question

    Thanks for the response. I agree with most of your comments. Keto definitely is not for everyone. Although Keto does not require calorie counting, it also isn't a license to ear as much as you want as long as it's on the diet. I track my calories daily and stay at or below 1500 a day at this point. I will eventually go up closer to 2000, but this is working for now and I am only 14 weeks post-OP. I will sit down with my nutritionist in three months after I have my next round of bloodwork to see if I need to make any changes. I will say one thing that should apply to any health diet---stay away from commercial, processed foods and beverages. Don't eat anything that l, when you look at the ingredients, sounds like it was invented in a lab. Stay away from simple carbs and sugar. We don't need them. You can't go wrong with a whole foods diet, with or without keto. Sent from my SM-G965U1 using Tapatalk
  23. SteveT74

    December 2018 Sleevers!

    Thanks! Sent from my SM-G965U1 using Tapatalk
  24. SteveT74

    December 2018 Sleevers!

    That's awesome!!!! I am definitely not losing two pounds a week, so that's great! I would like to lose another 10, but that might take a few months. I am not sure I really need to really lose anymore, but I wanted cushion against regain. I am lean now and would love to get a six pack for the first time in my life. I think I have some loose skin that might make that difficult though--not sure if it's fat or skin. I wish I could afford a tummy tuck!!! Sent from my SM-G965U1 using Tapatalk
  25. SteveT74

    December 2018 Sleevers!

    I have my wife to do that for me. [emoji3] Sent from my SM-G965U1 using Tapatalk
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