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Amanda Dutton LPC

Gastric Bypass Patients
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  1. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Panda333 in Acid reflux & sleeve   
    If you have reflux before surgery, sleeve generally won't help. I know there are a few that have gotten relief from occasional heartburn, but since the sleeve leaves access to stomach acid in the sleeve (RNY separates it and it doesn't meet the food until after the pouch), it's not going to change the cause of reflux.

    It's definitely something to consider.

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."


  2. Congrats!
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Aprilgal in Sharing my knowledge - my 14-year Surgi-versary!   
    Hi, everyone!
    Today (1/3/19) is my 14 year surgi-versary, and I wanted to Celebrate by sharing the gift of knowledge with anyone who may be a few steps behind me.
    1. Be kind to yourself. This journey is long and hard and most definitely bumpy - but it's yours to do with as you see fit. Don't settle, but don't beat yourself up for a misstep. We did that for too long before surgery, k?
    2. Be strong. You are your own best advocate. You know your body, and you know when something is not right. Push for answers. Assert yourself. Fight for what you need.
    3. Be vulnerable. Cry, scream, punch pillows - do whatever works and won't get you in trouble, hurt or arrested. Be emotional. Keeping those feelings stuck deep inside is what lead many of us to overeating. Don't give feelings back that power.
    4. Be open. Ask for help. Seek help. It may feel weird and strange and icky, I know. But take care of yourself. Self-care isn't selfish. It's totally selfLESS. We can't do anything for people that need us if we fall apart, so flip the script and practice recognizing self-care as the greatest gift you can give others.
    5. Be grateful. Every day. Even for something small. Each time we wake up, it's a reminder that we get another opportunity to make a change in ourselves and the world.
    And above all else...
    BE YOU. [emoji175][emoji175][emoji175][emoji175]
      
    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."
  3. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from ohjuly7878 in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gastric Bypass   
    Hey! I haven't posted on BP in ages, but got back on and came across your post, so I thought I'd offer an encouraging response.
    I'm 14 years post RNY and have RA & also take Humira. I've had no issues with it being effective, since it's an injectable and not oral. I also take Gabapentin for fibromyalgia and it hasn't been an issue either.
    My RA wasn't diagnosed until about 5 years ago, but I have had signs for years. I also use a topical NSAID with no issues (Voltaren gel), again, since it's not oral, but I don't use it often.
    Hope that helps!
    ~SW: 278, CW:168 & proud!~
  4. Congrats!
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Aprilgal in Sharing my knowledge - my 14-year Surgi-versary!   
    Hi, everyone!
    Today (1/3/19) is my 14 year surgi-versary, and I wanted to Celebrate by sharing the gift of knowledge with anyone who may be a few steps behind me.
    1. Be kind to yourself. This journey is long and hard and most definitely bumpy - but it's yours to do with as you see fit. Don't settle, but don't beat yourself up for a misstep. We did that for too long before surgery, k?
    2. Be strong. You are your own best advocate. You know your body, and you know when something is not right. Push for answers. Assert yourself. Fight for what you need.
    3. Be vulnerable. Cry, scream, punch pillows - do whatever works and won't get you in trouble, hurt or arrested. Be emotional. Keeping those feelings stuck deep inside is what lead many of us to overeating. Don't give feelings back that power.
    4. Be open. Ask for help. Seek help. It may feel weird and strange and icky, I know. But take care of yourself. Self-care isn't selfish. It's totally selfLESS. We can't do anything for people that need us if we fall apart, so flip the script and practice recognizing self-care as the greatest gift you can give others.
    5. Be grateful. Every day. Even for something small. Each time we wake up, it's a reminder that we get another opportunity to make a change in ourselves and the world.
    And above all else...
    BE YOU. [emoji175][emoji175][emoji175][emoji175]
      
    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."
  5. Thanks
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Emilia DD in Inspiration from those who stalled and turned it around?   
    I posted this last week, but I hope it is helpful for you.

    https://www.bariatricpal.com/applications/tapatalk/index.php?/topic/421945-Sharing-my-knowledge---my-14-year-Surgi-versary!#entry4731671

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  6. Congrats!
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Aprilgal in Sharing my knowledge - my 14-year Surgi-versary!   
    Hi, everyone!
    Today (1/3/19) is my 14 year surgi-versary, and I wanted to Celebrate by sharing the gift of knowledge with anyone who may be a few steps behind me.
    1. Be kind to yourself. This journey is long and hard and most definitely bumpy - but it's yours to do with as you see fit. Don't settle, but don't beat yourself up for a misstep. We did that for too long before surgery, k?
    2. Be strong. You are your own best advocate. You know your body, and you know when something is not right. Push for answers. Assert yourself. Fight for what you need.
    3. Be vulnerable. Cry, scream, punch pillows - do whatever works and won't get you in trouble, hurt or arrested. Be emotional. Keeping those feelings stuck deep inside is what lead many of us to overeating. Don't give feelings back that power.
    4. Be open. Ask for help. Seek help. It may feel weird and strange and icky, I know. But take care of yourself. Self-care isn't selfish. It's totally selfLESS. We can't do anything for people that need us if we fall apart, so flip the script and practice recognizing self-care as the greatest gift you can give others.
    5. Be grateful. Every day. Even for something small. Each time we wake up, it's a reminder that we get another opportunity to make a change in ourselves and the world.
    And above all else...
    BE YOU. [emoji175][emoji175][emoji175][emoji175]
      
    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."
  7. Congrats!
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Aprilgal in Sharing my knowledge - my 14-year Surgi-versary!   
    Hi, everyone!
    Today (1/3/19) is my 14 year surgi-versary, and I wanted to Celebrate by sharing the gift of knowledge with anyone who may be a few steps behind me.
    1. Be kind to yourself. This journey is long and hard and most definitely bumpy - but it's yours to do with as you see fit. Don't settle, but don't beat yourself up for a misstep. We did that for too long before surgery, k?
    2. Be strong. You are your own best advocate. You know your body, and you know when something is not right. Push for answers. Assert yourself. Fight for what you need.
    3. Be vulnerable. Cry, scream, punch pillows - do whatever works and won't get you in trouble, hurt or arrested. Be emotional. Keeping those feelings stuck deep inside is what lead many of us to overeating. Don't give feelings back that power.
    4. Be open. Ask for help. Seek help. It may feel weird and strange and icky, I know. But take care of yourself. Self-care isn't selfish. It's totally selfLESS. We can't do anything for people that need us if we fall apart, so flip the script and practice recognizing self-care as the greatest gift you can give others.
    5. Be grateful. Every day. Even for something small. Each time we wake up, it's a reminder that we get another opportunity to make a change in ourselves and the world.
    And above all else...
    BE YOU. [emoji175][emoji175][emoji175][emoji175]
      
    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."
  8. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from jg7979 in  BIG NEWS! Several insurers are REMOVING supervised diet requirements   
    I have a legitimate question, please? Speaking as a therapist and a RNY vet.

    What is it about taking away the supervised program that is attractive to those of you that are seeking surgery? Is it that it takes away one of the multiple hoops we already have to jump through or is it that it shortens the length of time before scheduling surgery?

    The biggest reason I ask is because it seems kind of scary for me because so many folks I work with (and folks here, too) are already saying that they felt so unprepared for life after surgery, I'm afraid that shortening the timeframes even more will make it even worse. So much of the medically supervised time should be for the "pre-work."

    I just really worry that this is a secret way for insurance to come back later and say "see, this bariatric surgery thing isn't working. All these people are gaining their weight back. We should stop covering it."

    I know, I know - it sounds like a conspiracy theory, but I deal with insurance companies not wanting to pay for services so often (3 sessions after a suicide attempt? Sure, that'll be plenty! [emoji849]), it just wouldn't surprise me. 🤷‍♀️

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."


  9. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from wallpapermusic in Bipolar diagnosis   
    So glad I came across this thread. Hopefully I can help.

    Therapist, specialize in treating us, also complete evaluations, also have Bipolar I (and had surgery so...🤷🏼‍♀️).

    According to the actual guidelines that we are supposed to follow regarding who has to be considered as not ready for surgery:
    - actively psychotic
    - recent (past year) inpatient hospitalization for mental health (suicidal/homicidal)
    - drug/alcohol abuse within the past 6 months
    - unstable mental health diagnosis (e.g. not actively in treatment, not keeping up with meds and appointments, etc.)

    Now, the good news is, NONE of those things mean the person will NEVER be approved - they may just have to have a period of time that they show stability/treatment compliance BEFORE they get approved.

    That info is straight from the ASMBS (American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery) guidelines. If the psychiatrist says otherwise, he can take it up with them! 🤣

    I hope that helps.

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  10. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from wallpapermusic in Bipolar diagnosis   
    So glad I came across this thread. Hopefully I can help.

    Therapist, specialize in treating us, also complete evaluations, also have Bipolar I (and had surgery so...🤷🏼‍♀️).

    According to the actual guidelines that we are supposed to follow regarding who has to be considered as not ready for surgery:
    - actively psychotic
    - recent (past year) inpatient hospitalization for mental health (suicidal/homicidal)
    - drug/alcohol abuse within the past 6 months
    - unstable mental health diagnosis (e.g. not actively in treatment, not keeping up with meds and appointments, etc.)

    Now, the good news is, NONE of those things mean the person will NEVER be approved - they may just have to have a period of time that they show stability/treatment compliance BEFORE they get approved.

    That info is straight from the ASMBS (American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery) guidelines. If the psychiatrist says otherwise, he can take it up with them! 🤣

    I hope that helps.

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  11. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from FluffyChix in Weight Loss Meds???   
    You are very welcome! I've been there, so I'm happy to help. Even WITH insurance coverage, I am on a med for an autoimmune disorder that would cost $2300 a WEEK if it wasn't for patient assistance. Now it's $5/month.

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  12. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Jezzabelle360 in Weight Loss Meds???   
    Apply for patient assistance through the manufacturer. You may be able to still get the Trintellix, possibly for free. Scroll down on the website to the Trintellix link.

    https://www.takeda.com/en-us/corporate-responsibility/patient-assistance

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  13. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Jezzabelle360 in Weight Loss Meds???   
    Apply for patient assistance through the manufacturer. You may be able to still get the Trintellix, possibly for free. Scroll down on the website to the Trintellix link.

    https://www.takeda.com/en-us/corporate-responsibility/patient-assistance

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  14. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from ProudGrammy in Am I a 'recovered' morbidly obese person?   
    So, I think I might be able to help on this one.

    Food addiction - or really, an eating disorder - has actually been shown to be fundamentally different from other addictions in that you *can* recover from it.

    Although we call ourselves "food addicts" we aren't really, because food isn't something that we can abstain from 100%, like other addictions. It's a process addiction, meaning the addiction is the behavior instead of the substance.

    As we work on the recovery from the disordered eating behavior, we can learn how to become a (hate this word) "normal" eater. BUT...

    We can still have a relapse if we get too comfortable! If it helps to think of yourself as being in lifelong recovery (it's how I still choose to think about it at 14 years out), then rock on. Either way is fine!

    I'm super proud to read what you wrote about how good it feels for food to not be the main focus in your life! Doesn't it feel awesome??


    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  15. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from seaforest in Depression and anxiety   
    You are totally right (but I may be biased, too - LoL - also a counselor!), we lost our #1 coping tool and have to start feeling "all the things," probably for the first time in a really long time. For me, it was like being an addict (who am I kidding, I am an addict) jonesing for the next hit so I could "numb it all away."

    For some of us (yes, us - even some therapists), we will always need medication. I look at it like this - the meds are like my life raft - but it's still up to me to paddle if I want to get anywhere.

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  16. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from starr313 in Big Book on the Gastric Sleeve Book   
    That's why it's all about learning! Who knows? You may have totally just helped someone else who wouldn't have been brave enough to ask! Glad you got the answer - especially since you were able to figure it out yourself!

    I use this website to reference when trying to get an idea of how much protein something has and I don't have a label. Hope this is helpful to you! http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/info/books-phds/books/foodfacts/html/data/data2d.html

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  17. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from VooLivre2017 in Advice from a veteran   
    Hi, everyone!
    I posted this in the veterans forum, but I thought y'all might really benefit from hearing/reading this, too.
    Today (1/3/19) is my 14 year surgi-versary, and I wanted to Celebrate by sharing the gift of knowledge with anyone who may be a few steps behind me.
    1. Be kind to yourself. This journey is long and hard and most definitely bumpy - but it's yours to do with as you see fit. Don't settle, but don't beat yourself up for a misstep. We did that for too long before surgery, k?
    2. Be strong. You are your own best advocate. You know your body, and you know when something is not right. Push for answers. Assert yourself. Fight for what you need.
    3. Be vulnerable. Cry, scream, punch pillows - do whatever works and won't get you in trouble, hurt or arrested. Be emotional. Keeping those feelings stuck deep inside is what lead many of us to overeating. Don't give feelings back that power.
    4. Be open. Ask for help. Seek help. It may feel weird and strange and icky, I know. But take care of yourself. Self-care isn't selfish. It's totally selfLESS. We can't do anything for people that need us if we fall apart, so flip the script and practice recognizing self-care as the greatest gift you can give others.
    5. Be grateful. Every day. Even for something small. Each time we wake up, it's a reminder that we get another opportunity to make a change in ourselves and the world.
    And above all else...
    BE YOU.   
    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."
  18. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from ProudGrammy in Has anyone kept their surgery a secret?   
    It's definitely a personal choice. I think it's totally appropriate for you to do whatever makes you feel comfortable. You may decide to not say anything for awhile and then one day change your mind - or not!

    Everyone in my circle knew because it had been a long decision process for me and I wanted the accountability. Eventually, the transformation was significant and it stuck, so it was something I was proud to share. Now, I've made my journey my life purpose, so I definitely share with everyone I encounter if the opportunity arises and it keeps me even more accountable (I'm a therapist and I coach bariatric surgery patients, too).

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."


  19. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from ProudGrammy in "We don't think you're a good candidate for WLS at this time" ....Should I seek a 2nd opinion?   
    Therapist here, 14 years post RNY. ‍♀️

    Definitely see a different clinic AND start seeing a therapist (preferably see the therapist at least once so you can tell the new clinic you are going).

    Based on your post, nothing stands out that would indicate that you couldn't have surgery.

    1) even if you were stress eating - not something that can't be dealt with in therapy (e.g. I think most of us stress eat at some point, TBH)
    2) My original doctor said I "wasn't bog enough" for surgery (278lbs, 26 years old, arthritis in knees and high blood pressure) - so I fired him and went to another doc. She saw and heard me, so she agreed that I could have surgery
    3) if all else fails, go ahead and see a psychologist for an evaluation. Find one in network with your insurance AND that is approved by the surgery group, if they have a list). Nothing like having a step out of the way AND validation that you are ready.

    Hope that helps!

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  20. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Neversaynever in Less than 1 week post surgical and can't stop FANTASIZING ABOUT FOOD!   
    So very normal!

    If we think about it like an addict (which most of us are, whether we realize it or not), we are in "withdrawal" after surgery from the carbs, sugar and fat our bodies are used to. So our brains start saying "hold up - where did it all go? Did you forget we like this stuff? Let me remind you!"

    Drug addicts call these "using dreams." They can be so real, they will wake up convinced they relapsed. It happens to us too.

    So look at it as your brain realizing that it's not getting all the "bad stuff" - not the lettuce, but the fatty things that would go with it - and Celebrate. You may feel like you're going crazy, but you're really going through detox.

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."


  21. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Naughty Glitter Goddess in Psychological roller coaster   
    100% normal right now. Oh honey, your body is already running off of the fat cells just to keep you upright, so you are getting a big old hormone dump.

    Since we hardly get any nutrients early on, we are using way more calories than we take in just to think, breathe and keep our organs running. So our bodies are just throwing fat cells into the furnace and those hormones are raging.

    It WILL continue to get better, bit I know that doesn't help now. Vent here. Rant here. Let us support you, cheer for you and Celebrate with you.

    If you DO want to journal, don't think of it as a "dear diary" type thing. It can be your thoughts, song lyrics, doodles, or even a giant profanity scrawled across the page! LoL

    Whatever you feel, feel it. Your experience is valid and real. Allowing yourself to feel thos stuff now will help you beat cravings later because you will know that you can live through the feelings without food. And you'll be a rockstar!

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  22. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from ABawdyMermaid in Life without NSAIDS?   
    Cbdistillery and Lazarus Naturals are my favorites. I have RA and fibro, so not being able to take NSAIDS is a b**ch. But I also do the CBD under the tongue and it works well for me.

    And it's recently been federally approved for farming, so every state should be able to get it now (CBD has 0.3% THC or less, so it's legal to sell/have/use in even non-MJ friendly states.

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  23. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC reacted to MegHealthy in Middle GA(2018)   
    That’s a great idea to start to taper more! Diet Coke and not drinking while I’m eating are going to be two big ones for me! I’ll keep you posted, I hope you are doing well on your journey!
  24. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from ProudGrammy in Am I a 'recovered' morbidly obese person?   
    So, I think I might be able to help on this one.

    Food addiction - or really, an eating disorder - has actually been shown to be fundamentally different from other addictions in that you *can* recover from it.

    Although we call ourselves "food addicts" we aren't really, because food isn't something that we can abstain from 100%, like other addictions. It's a process addiction, meaning the addiction is the behavior instead of the substance.

    As we work on the recovery from the disordered eating behavior, we can learn how to become a (hate this word) "normal" eater. BUT...

    We can still have a relapse if we get too comfortable! If it helps to think of yourself as being in lifelong recovery (it's how I still choose to think about it at 14 years out), then rock on. Either way is fine!

    I'm super proud to read what you wrote about how good it feels for food to not be the main focus in your life! Doesn't it feel awesome??


    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

  25. Like
    Amanda Dutton LPC got a reaction from Naughty Glitter Goddess in Psychological roller coaster   
    100% normal right now. Oh honey, your body is already running off of the fat cells just to keep you upright, so you are getting a big old hormone dump.

    Since we hardly get any nutrients early on, we are using way more calories than we take in just to think, breathe and keep our organs running. So our bodies are just throwing fat cells into the furnace and those hormones are raging.

    It WILL continue to get better, bit I know that doesn't help now. Vent here. Rant here. Let us support you, cheer for you and Celebrate with you.

    If you DO want to journal, don't think of it as a "dear diary" type thing. It can be your thoughts, song lyrics, doodles, or even a giant profanity scrawled across the page! LoL

    Whatever you feel, feel it. Your experience is valid and real. Allowing yourself to feel thos stuff now will help you beat cravings later because you will know that you can live through the feelings without food. And you'll be a rockstar!

    ~SW: 278 CW: 165~
    RNY 1/5/2005
    "What got you here won't get you there."

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