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7 Bites_Jen

Gastric Sleeve Patients
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Everything posted by 7 Bites_Jen

  1. 7 Bites_Jen

    Cream of wheat

    Oh, definitely add the cinnamon too
  2. 7 Bites_Jen

    Medical followup after the sleeve: PCP or surgeon?

    For the first 18 months after surgery, I saw my surgeon on anything and everything gastric related. Everything else was my PCP.
  3. 7 Bites_Jen

    Pregnancy

    I have several friends that have had very successful pregnancies and healthy births after surgery! One has even had two since her sleeve surgery (she was sleeved in 2011 - baby #1 was 2013 and baby #2 was just born last week )
  4. 7 Bites_Jen

    Hi everyone

    Congrats!! Sounds like you're doing great! Keep us posted on your progress!
  5. What a boost! I bet that felt good
  6. 7 Bites_Jen

    Cream of wheat

    I did eat it on pureed - I couldn't keep down much during that time so I had to rely on whatever I COULD eat. You can add a sprinkle of Protein powder, a spoonful of natural nut butter, some Greek yogurt or some silken tofu to it to add some protein to it.
  7. Wow, this one stepped on my toes - in a GOOD way! I completely relate to every one of these issues - especially the quick fix one. A lot of WLS patients are not only addicted to food, but they're addicted to dieting as well! Always looking for that perfect eating plan, that perfect diet, and the "next best thing". What I was searching for was validation that it was okay for me to eat certain foods!
  8. This is great! I especially like that you mention hanging out with the wrong people. I'm noticing two types of people in my life: those that are food-obsessed and those that aren't. When I'm with the people that are food-obsessed I find myself eating poorly. When I hang out with people that aren't obsessed I don't even THINK about food. Great article!
  9. First off - BREATHE!! Second - go give yourself a bit hug. It's not uncommon to gain a little when you go from liquids to soft foods. Be sure you're getting in your liquids, be sure you're getting in your protein, and be sure you're moving! Those three things are key components. If you're still concerned, you might talk to your doctor or your nutritionist and they can give you some good insight on what's going on.
  10. 7 Bites_Jen

    Any Regrets?

    I have zero regrets. Things may not have always been perfect, and I've made a lot of mistakes along the way, but with every mistake came knowledge. I've learned so much during this journey about myself, my body, and about health and nutrition in general. <3
  11. It’s summertime again! Which means hot sun, cold drinks, and trips to the beach, the pool, and to the lake (camping, anyone?). Summertime is a great opportunity to get back on track with protein-rich meals that will help you beat the heat! It’s summertime again! Which means hot sun, cold drinks, and trips to the beach, the pool, and to the lake (camping, anyone?). Summertime is a great opportunity to get back on track with protein-rich meals that will help you beat the heat! Grill Baby! Grilling is one of the best ways to cook meats and vegetables in the summer - it won’t heat your house and you can be creative with marinades! We love to marinade chicken in a simple mixture of 1/4 C olive oil, 1/4 C lemon juice, 1 T garlic, and 1/2 C water. Steak gets a bath in 1/4 C soy sauce, 1/4 C Worcestershire sauce, and 1 T garlic. Pork and fish can get a similar treatment as chicken, as can vegetables. You can also use store bought marinades and salad dressings to add bold flavor. Be sure to watch for added sugars and salt, though! A great tip for grilling - for fish and vegetables, invest in a grill basket. It will keep your food from falling through the grates of the grill! Meat Salads Meat salads are absolutely fabulous in the summer. Tuna and chicken are super popular, but you can also use salmon (remove the bones if using canned), mixed seafoods, and shrimp! A great cold shrimp salad that is full of flavor, protein, and good fats is shrimp, avocado, and red onion in a summery lemon vinaigrette. You can find the recipe here! You can also play with flavorings, adding herbs, different sauces, and condiments to your meat salad: Southwest Tuna Salad 1 T Greek Yogurt 1 T salsa 1 can chunk light tuna, packed in water, drained chopped onion to taste 2 T black beans (optional), rinsed and drained Combine yogurt and salsa in a bowl. Add onion and stir. Allow to sit for 2-5 minutes to marinate onion. Add beans (if using) and tuna and gently stir. Serve chilled. Speaking Of Salads ... Another great salad option is a salad-in-a-jar. These are all the rage on Pinterest and Facebook, and are as customizable as you’d want. Just layer your salad with dressing on the bottom, followed by any chopped veggies such as tomatoes or onions, then whatever meat you’re using, followed by cheese, then your salad greens. The formula we use is (in a 1 pint jar): 1 T dressing 2 T chopped veggies 2-3 oz cooked meat 1/2-1 oz shredded or crumbled cheese Salad greens packed into the top of the jar. Don’t have a jar? No worries, just throw your stuff in a bowl and give it a toss! Pre-chopped veggies can be stored in an air-tight container for a few days, so you can still do prep work earlier in the week. Soup? In SUMMER??? Yes! You can even do soup in summer! Light broth-based soups and cold veggie soups can help you stay hydrated in the heat. A super easy throw-together light soup I love is: (About 4 bariatric servings of 1/2 C) 1 C shredded chicken 1 box chicken broth or stock 1/4 C frozen corn (optional) 1 chopped zucchini You LITERALLY throw it all into a pot, bring it to a boil, cook it for 10-15 minutes and you’re done! Soup eating tip - if you have the gastric band or the RnY it may be helpful to drink the broth first then eat the solids. Sip Sip Sip! Yes, keeping those fluids up is STILL important. Even more so during the summer! Water is best for hydration, of course, but sometimes you want something a little different. Try making your own fruit-infused water or tea! There are some great infuser bottles and pitchers on the market right now, or you can just muddle (shmoosh a bit) the fruit in the bottom of your glass or pitcher and pour your liquid right over it. This is also a great way to use up that leftover fruit you might have sitting in your fridge! Summer is all about staying cool, calm and collected - all the while keeping our nutrition and hydration going! You can do it! Share your ideas below in the comments section!
  12. 7 Bites_Jen

    Great Summer Meals to Keep You Chillin'

    Oh that sounds fantastic! We're actually going to be making gazpacho on the show! I will have to have some Greek yogurt on hand for that!!
  13. Congratulations on your new journey! I definitely agree 100% with what everyone has said on Protein. At this stage, I wouldn't add fruit YET (that can come later). You can absolutely make your own shake though - you can add some extracts, sugar free syrups (Torani makes some wonderful ones), and you can even add things like powdered Jello or crystal light to them as well to add flavor without adding texture. The rumbling in your tummy could be hunger, but it's more likely your new tummy working away. Our bodies are a machine, and our sleeves are the gas tank. When we eat, we're filling the tank, so to speak. When it's digesting, it can sometimes rumble and gurgle - in the beginning I really thought it was hunger, so I would try to eat and then make myself sick!
  14. 7 Bites_Jen

    Here I am!

    Congratulations on your surgery! And good job with all the hard work you've already put in! I totally relate to being scared of complications. Every time I felt bad the word, "LEAK" went through my brain. Thankfully, it was NEVER the case. Complications DO happen, but they are pretty rare. So ... BREATHE! There's a good chance that you're not going to have any problems. If you DO feel any symptoms like chest pain, uncontrollable shortness of breath, rapid heart rate, or fever then call your doctor ASAP. But it sounds like you're doing an amazing job - the pain after 2 sips is normal, BTW. Your tummy is still very swollen. Just take it super slow! Keep it up!
  15. 7 Bites_Jen

    Great Summer Meals to Keep You Chillin'

    It’s summertime again! Which means hot sun, cold drinks, and trips to the beach, the pool, and to the lake (camping, anyone?). Summertime is a great opportunity to get back on track with protein-rich meals that will help you beat the heat! Grill Baby! Grilling is one of the best ways to cook meats and vegetables in the summer - it won’t heat your house and you can be creative with marinades! We love to marinade chicken in a simple mixture of 1/4 C olive oil, 1/4 C lemon juice, 1 T garlic, and 1/2 C water. Steak gets a bath in 1/4 C soy sauce, 1/4 C Worcestershire sauce, and 1 T garlic. Pork and fish can get a similar treatment as chicken, as can vegetables. You can also use store bought marinades and salad dressings to add bold flavor. Be sure to watch for added sugars and salt, though! A great tip for grilling - for fish and vegetables, invest in a grill basket. It will keep your food from falling through the grates of the grill! Meat Salads Meat salads are absolutely fabulous in the summer. Tuna and chicken are super popular, but you can also use salmon (remove the bones if using canned), mixed seafoods, and shrimp! A great cold shrimp salad that is full of flavor, protein, and good fats is shrimp, avocado, and red onion in a summery lemon vinaigrette. You can find the recipe here! You can also play with flavorings, adding herbs, different sauces, and condiments to your meat salad: Southwest Tuna Salad 1 T Greek Yogurt 1 T salsa 1 can chunk light tuna, packed in water, drained chopped onion to taste 2 T black beans (optional), rinsed and drained Combine yogurt and salsa in a bowl. Add onion and stir. Allow to sit for 2-5 minutes to marinate onion. Add beans (if using) and tuna and gently stir. Serve chilled. Speaking Of Salads ... Another great salad option is a salad-in-a-jar. These are all the rage on Pinterest and Facebook, and are as customizable as you’d want. Just layer your salad with dressing on the bottom, followed by any chopped veggies such as tomatoes or onions, then whatever meat you’re using, followed by cheese, then your salad greens. The formula we use is (in a 1 pint jar): 1 T dressing 2 T chopped veggies 2-3 oz cooked meat 1/2-1 oz shredded or crumbled cheese Salad greens packed into the top of the jar. Don’t have a jar? No worries, just throw your stuff in a bowl and give it a toss! Pre-chopped veggies can be stored in an air-tight container for a few days, so you can still do prep work earlier in the week. Soup? In SUMMER??? Yes! You can even do soup in summer! Light broth-based soups and cold veggie soups can help you stay hydrated in the heat. A super easy throw-together light soup I love is: (About 4 bariatric servings of 1/2 C) 1 C shredded chicken 1 box chicken broth or stock 1/4 C frozen corn (optional) 1 chopped zucchini You LITERALLY throw it all into a pot, bring it to a boil, cook it for 10-15 minutes and you’re done! Soup eating tip - if you have the gastric band or the RnY it may be helpful to drink the broth first then eat the solids. Sip Sip Sip! Yes, keeping those fluids up is STILL important. Even more so during the summer! Water is best for hydration, of course, but sometimes you want something a little different. Try making your own fruit-infused water or tea! There are some great infuser bottles and pitchers on the market right now, or you can just muddle (shmoosh a bit) the fruit in the bottom of your glass or pitcher and pour your liquid right over it. This is also a great way to use up that leftover fruit you might have sitting in your fridge! Summer is all about staying cool, calm and collected - all the while keeping our nutrition and hydration going! You can do it! Share your ideas below in the comments section!
  16. I can answer your question as to why they only followed contestants for 7 months - they didn't want to admit that the contestants 1) stopped losing and/or 2) regained a SIGNIFICANT amount of weight. I would have to search for the article, but a contestant came out saying that about 60% of the contestants regained the majority of their weight back after leaving the ranch. The idea of living the Biggest Loser lifestyle outside the Biggest Loser ranch is absolutely ridiculous, and he is an irresponsible medical professional for pretending that it is not only possible, but healthy for long-term weight loss and maintenance.
  17. Snacking habits are a hot topic in the Bariatric community. There are both healthy and unhealthy ways of snacking for those of us with tiny tummies. Can you tell the difference? Snacking. This is a hot topic in the WLS World. It’s become the Great American Pastime, having raced past baseball in popularity levels. Everyone does it. Most of the time, it’s okay. There’s usually nothing wrong with a handful of nuts there, or a cheese-topped cracker here. But when it takes over and becomes something more ... sinister, shall we say - well, it becomes something that we need to take control of IMMEDIATELY. There are many ways that snacking can be healthy. An apple with peanut butter, for example, makes a great post-workout snack, replenishing electrolytes and vital sugars. Or some carrots with hummus dip at 3pm - keeping our hunger satiated until dinner time. So, then, when does it become UNhealthy ..? Unhealthy Snacking Snacking can quickly go from a nutritious pick-me-up to a problem very quickly. here are some ways that can happen: Mindless Snacking. Sitting in front of the TV eating a bowl of cheese puffs, for example. You’re not actually thinking about what you’re eating, you’re just stuffing them into your mouth wondering which Game of Thrones character will be the next to die (because, at this point, it could be ANYONE). Another example of this is just grabbing the first thing you see off the shelf because it’s there. Snacking When You’re Not Hungry. One misconception that a lot of people have is that the human body needs fuel every few hours. This is not true. Your body needs fuel when it tells you you need it. You’ll know. There’s usually an empty feeling in one’s tummy followed by a gurgling sound. If you’re feeling neither of these things, you’re not hungry and your body is not in need of fuel just then. I hear people all the time say, “I’m eating every two hours and I’m still not losing.” I wonder if they ever consider they’re not losing because they’re over-fueling their bodies? Snacking On Unhealthy Foods. Please, please, please do NOT tell me those fruit-filled “fiber” cookies are healthy. Please. They’re not. Period. They’re junk food. They may be “high in fiber” and made with “whole grain” but they still have just as much fat, sugar, and calories as their cream-filled counterparts. Also culprits for pretending to be healthy: baked chips, sugar-free candy, fat-free ... well ANYTHING. Here’s the deal. If you’re going to snack, make it something that is as nutritionally sound as possible. Eat an apple or a banana with some cheese or peanut butter. Eat some celery with spreadable goat cheese. Eat something that is actual FOOD. NOT something that is filled with preservatives, sugar, sodium, and God-knows-what ... Snacking All The Time. In other words, snacking instead of having a meal. We call this “grazing” and in the Bariatric community it’s a huge no-no. Why? Well, quite simply because when we graze, we’re basically “eating around” our surgeries. We’re able to eat more food over the course of the day when we do this, thus increasing our caloric intake to, possibly, more than we’re supposed to. This can lead to re-gain. So if you’ve noticed that scale creeping up a bit, check your eating habits. This could very well be the culprit. Healthy Snacking So, then, what IS healthy snacking in the WLS world? Here are some tips that can help you make better snacking choices. MindFUL Snacking. Plan your snacks out ahead of time and have them pre-prepped and ready to go. Some really good ones for this - boiled eggs, boiled shrimp, cubed cheese, cooked meats like chicken or ground beef. Then, sit down at a table with your snack and eat it with utensils like you would an actual meal. Be mindful about every bite you’re eating. Take a bite. Taste your food. Be thoughtful about it. Be THANKFUL for it. Not Hungry? Don’t Eat! It sounds like such a simple concept, and it’s one that so many of us (myself included) have issue with. So you think you’re supposed to eat every two hours. But you’re not hungry. Think for a second. Do you feel empty? Does it feel like your blood sugar is dropping? Are you listless or lacking in energy? If the answer to these questions is no, then you don’t have to eat. Don’t force yourself to eat when you’re not hungry. It’s never a good practice, especially for a recovering food addict. Snack on Healthy, Less-Processed, High Protein Foods. There are so many good foods out there that are real food and not filled with junk. I’ve already talked about things like boiled eggs and meats. Other good choices are: nuts, string cheese (check the labels for sodium and sugar), jerky (again, watch the sodium if this is a concern), tuna/salmon packs, beans, etc. Any and all of these things are great choices. If you need something crunchy or sweet add in a piece of fruit or raw veggie that you like (try red bell pepper with hummus. Seriously yum ...). The point is, be sure that if you DO snack that you’re eating protein first and adding in fruits or veggies when needed. Snack Only When You Need To. When you’re actually hungry. After you workout. If you feel your blood sugar dropping. THESE are all reasons to snack. Not because you’re bored, not because so-and-so on whatever forum told you you’re supposed to eat every 2 hours, and not because you see that piece of cake lying there and just can’t turn away from it. Many doctors and nutritionists tell us not to snack at all. If this is your case, then by all means, PLEASE follow their directions and their orders. I’m not a doctor or nutritionist. The information contained here is not to be considered as medical advice, but as personal opinion from someone that’s experienced weight issues, obesity, and weight loss surgery.
  18. Have you gotten off track and lost your "Bariatric Brain"? Maybe it's time to start thinking like a bariatric patient again! Let’s face it - after bariatric surgery, life is not the same. Your diet will change, your body will change, and in many cases, your attitude will change. For many of us, however, a point in time comes when we find ourselves in a different state. In some respect, we almost forget that we’ve had bariatric surgery. After our initial phases of being on liquids, soft and chopped foods, and transitioning into full solids, we spend some time reveling in our ability to eat a ton less and to be able to only eat certain foods. For the first 6-12 months, we are in a “honeymoon phase” of sorts - we’re losing weight easily, we have the assurance that we just CAN’T eat certain things such as rice, bread, pasta, etc., and we’re in a certain mindset that I’ve dubbed the “Bariatric Brain”. For some of us, that mindset remains because we are never able to eat certain things without them getting stuck or without experiencing dumping syndrome. For others, that mindset all but disappears when we discover that we can eat certain foods without sliming or them getting stuck, or that other foods no longer send us to the bathroom for an hour. From my own experience, the downfall out of the “Bariatric Brain” began 6 months after my surgery. I was told my my nutritionist that I was allowed to have carbonation from that point on. I was a little confused, as all of the other people I knew with the sleeve had been told they could never have it again, but my addiction to diet soda was stronger than my common sense. From that point on, I learned I could also eat bread (8 months), pasta (10 months) and rice (14 months). From there, it was no-holds barred. Something else that happens with the sleeve that they don’t tell you is that at a certain point - your stomach capacity will increase after a time. This is because for a few months, it’s swollen to a point that you can only hold about ½ a cup of food at one time. After the first year, and it is completely healed, that capacity increases to about a cup. For someone that’s not expecting that, it can be a little confusing. For a food addict, it can be exciting and tempting. At that point, you are no longer bound by restrictions. When this happens, some people begin to forget about their surgery. They begin to get back into a different mindset. One of “oh, I can eat this!” instead of, “Nope - gotta leave that off”. When this happens, the diet shifts to one of fast food, sugar, carbs, soft drinks, and alcohol (not every food in every case, mind you). It is that moment when the tool that we so greatly loved and admired begins to fail us. Or, rather, WE begin to fail our TOOL. When this happens, it’s time to return to the mindset we were in during the first year. It’s time to think like a bariatric patient again. This is no easy feat, after all, we’ve returned to our addiction - FOOD. But at the same time, in the case of most other addictions - drugs, alcohol, nicotine, etc. - there is almost always a backslide. A heroine addict may sneak out of rehab for that one more fix, an AA leader might get depressed one night and get insanely drunk, someone trying to quit smoking might sneak a puff or two at a rock concert. These instances are normal and, some believe, even a healthy part of the healing from addiction. If this is acceptable in these cases, why is it not acceptable in the weight loss world? When this happens, take a step back. Look at yourself from the outside in. It’s important here to remind yourself that getting off track is NORMAL and OK. Although not everyone has done it, many MANY people have - and some of those people have the most successful weight loss stories on the Bariatric Pal forum. With that in mind, how does one go back to the “Bariatric Brain”? Go Back To Basics Remember what started the weight loss to begin with? Protein, water, walking? Get back to it! Make sure you’re getting AT LEAST 60g of protein a day (even better is 80-90g!). Make sure you’re getting AT LEAST 64oz of water a day, and make sure you’re getting some kind of activity for AT LEAST 15 minutes a day (30-45 minutes is better). Return To Liquids? Some people return to a liquid diet for a few days (no more than 3). They feel that this helps “reset” their system and returns their mindset back to where it should be. One way of doing this is through the “5-Day Pouch Test” (designed for RnY or Gastric Band patients) in which you return to liquids for a few days then gradually return to solid foods. For those that have the sleeve or the duodenal switch, the pouch test might not work for you as it’s not designed for that kind of surgery. That being said, if you feel the need, you can also return to liquids for a few days. Return To Support Groups Support groups are the #1 key to a successful weight loss surgery, regardless of your surgery or your stage. If you are a year or more out, consider returning to a support group. Hearing what the people in the early stages are having issues with, and helping them work through those issues can, in fact, help you work through yours. Read, and Educate Yourself Consider finding books, articles, cookbooks, and magazines on bariatric surgery. Do research on one aspect that really interests you. Immerse yourself in it again like you did in the beginning! Remember Your Motivation What was your reason for having Bariatric Surgery to begin with? Your health? Your family? Your looks? Looking at what you wanted from your surgery and where you are now might help you to refocus. In The End Remember … What you are going through right now is okay, and completely normal. Thousands of people are going through exactly the same thing you are. You are not alone! Remember that if you’re REALLY struggling, you can always find help. Talk you your nutritionist or dietician, seek mentorship in a support group, or find a good counselor that has experience with food addiction and bariatric patients. And ALWAYS remember - YOU CAN DO THIS!!!
  19. I go back and re-read my nutritionists packet from surgery, then I go and watch some of my OLLLLLD YouTube Videos pre-surgery. It reminds me what I need to be doing and why I'm doing it!
  20. This is a great recipe that involves NO cooking and some pre-prepped help! PS If you want it hot rather than cold, it's easy to toss into a pan or a microwave
  21. LOVE IT! I absolutely LOVE my vacuum sealer. It's a life saver!
  22. 7 Bites_Jen

    Think Your Snacking Habits Are Healthy?

    Snacking. This is a hot topic in the WLS World. It’s become the Great American Pastime, having raced past baseball in popularity levels. Everyone does it. Most of the time, it’s okay. There’s usually nothing wrong with a handful of nuts there, or a cheese-topped cracker here. But when it takes over and becomes something more ... sinister, shall we say - well, it becomes something that we need to take control of IMMEDIATELY. There are many ways that snacking can be healthy. An apple with peanut butter, for example, makes a great post-workout snack, replenishing electrolytes and vital sugars. Or some carrots with hummus dip at 3pm - keeping our hunger satiated until dinner time. So, then, when does it become UNhealthy ..? Unhealthy Snacking Snacking can quickly go from a nutritious pick-me-up to a problem very quickly. here are some ways that can happen: Mindless Snacking. Sitting in front of the TV eating a bowl of cheese puffs, for example. You’re not actually thinking about what you’re eating, you’re just stuffing them into your mouth wondering which Game of Thrones character will be the next to die (because, at this point, it could be ANYONE). Another example of this is just grabbing the first thing you see off the shelf because it’s there. Snacking When You’re Not Hungry. One misconception that a lot of people have is that the human body needs fuel every few hours. This is not true. Your body needs fuel when it tells you you need it. You’ll know. There’s usually an empty feeling in one’s tummy followed by a gurgling sound. If you’re feeling neither of these things, you’re not hungry and your body is not in need of fuel just then. I hear people all the time say, “I’m eating every two hours and I’m still not losing.” I wonder if they ever consider they’re not losing because they’re over-fueling their bodies? Snacking On Unhealthy Foods. Please, please, please do NOT tell me those fruit-filled “fiber” cookies are healthy. Please. They’re not. Period. They’re junk food. They may be “high in fiber” and made with “whole grain” but they still have just as much fat, sugar, and calories as their cream-filled counterparts. Also culprits for pretending to be healthy: baked chips, sugar-free candy, fat-free ... well ANYTHING. Here’s the deal. If you’re going to snack, make it something that is as nutritionally sound as possible. Eat an apple or a banana with some cheese or peanut butter. Eat some celery with spreadable goat cheese. Eat something that is actual FOOD. NOT something that is filled with preservatives, sugar, sodium, and God-knows-what ... Snacking All The Time. In other words, snacking instead of having a meal. We call this “grazing” and in the Bariatric community it’s a huge no-no. Why? Well, quite simply because when we graze, we’re basically “eating around” our surgeries. We’re able to eat more food over the course of the day when we do this, thus increasing our caloric intake to, possibly, more than we’re supposed to. This can lead to re-gain. So if you’ve noticed that scale creeping up a bit, check your eating habits. This could very well be the culprit. Healthy Snacking So, then, what IS healthy snacking in the WLS world? Here are some tips that can help you make better snacking choices. MindFUL Snacking. Plan your snacks out ahead of time and have them pre-prepped and ready to go. Some really good ones for this - boiled eggs, boiled shrimp, cubed cheese, cooked meats like chicken or ground beef. Then, sit down at a table with your snack and eat it with utensils like you would an actual meal. Be mindful about every bite you’re eating. Take a bite. Taste your food. Be thoughtful about it. Be THANKFUL for it. Not Hungry? Don’t Eat! It sounds like such a simple concept, and it’s one that so many of us (myself included) have issue with. So you think you’re supposed to eat every two hours. But you’re not hungry. Think for a second. Do you feel empty? Does it feel like your blood sugar is dropping? Are you listless or lacking in energy? If the answer to these questions is no, then you don’t have to eat. Don’t force yourself to eat when you’re not hungry. It’s never a good practice, especially for a recovering food addict. Snack on Healthy, Less-Processed, High Protein Foods. There are so many good foods out there that are real food and not filled with junk. I’ve already talked about things like boiled eggs and meats. Other good choices are: nuts, string cheese (check the labels for sodium and sugar), jerky (again, watch the sodium if this is a concern), tuna/salmon packs, beans, etc. Any and all of these things are great choices. If you need something crunchy or sweet add in a piece of fruit or raw veggie that you like (try red bell pepper with hummus. Seriously yum ...). The point is, be sure that if you DO snack that you’re eating protein first and adding in fruits or veggies when needed. Snack Only When You Need To. When you’re actually hungry. After you workout. If you feel your blood sugar dropping. THESE are all reasons to snack. Not because you’re bored, not because so-and-so on whatever forum told you you’re supposed to eat every 2 hours, and not because you see that piece of cake lying there and just can’t turn away from it. Many doctors and nutritionists tell us not to snack at all. If this is your case, then by all means, PLEASE follow their directions and their orders. I’m not a doctor or nutritionist. The information contained here is not to be considered as medical advice, but as personal opinion from someone that’s experienced weight issues, obesity, and weight loss surgery.
  23. With the New Year comes the New Year Resolutions. For many people, one of the largest resolutions is a change in lifestyle - that includes losing weight! I remember my resolution in 2012 was to lose weight and get healthy. And I was able to do that with the help of the vertical sleeve. 2015 is going to hold that for many people and thousands of people undergo weight loss surgery to help them achieve their healthy goals for the new year. For those of you that are just thinking about surgery, I want to encourage you to know that you are not alone! You have a wealth of resources at your fingertips. I wanted to take a moment to share with you some amazing resources that you may find helpful on your journey! Websites BariatricPal.com Of course, BariatricPal is one of the very best websites to find information and support. Here there are “rooms” geared for each surgery as well as pages for recipes, articles, and much more. You will find information on everything you might want to know from before surgery to years after. I suggest checking out the Before/After pages for a good dose of motivation and inspiration! 7BitesShow.com 7 Bites is the first cooking series on YouTube geared specifically toward the bariatric community. The website has videos, recipes and blog posts. weightlosssurgerychannel.com Weight Loss Surgery Channel has a collection of videos on everything WLS related weather it be health, food and recipes, and more. BariatricFoodie The Bariatric Foodie has some great recipes for those that still love food, but want to stay on track TheWorldAccordingToEggface Eggface is one of the most popular of the bariatric cooking blogs. You will find great recipes, blog posts and giveaways on her blog. BariatricCookery.com This is a great resource page for everything from recipes to products. Books The “Big Book” series by Alex Breacher and Natalie Stein. There are four books in the series and all are great reads. They have a wealth of information on everything you need to know before, during and after surgery. The very best thing about these books is that they include personal stories from people that have been there. Breaking The Chains: A Guide To Bariatric Surgery by Jennifer DeMoss and Suzette Munson. The ladies of 7Bites pull from their and others’ experiences with weight loss surgery to provide a simplified, but comprehensive guide. Information on everything from how to pick your surgery and doctor to how to survive the first two weeks after surgery are included. The Sleeved Life by Pennie Nicola. This book tells about Pennie’s experience with the Vertical Sleeve procedure and discusses the ins and outs of the surgery from start to finish. Weight Loss Surgery For Dummies. The everything you ever wanted to know and then some guide to all things weight loss surgery. Many, MANY doctors and nurses recommend this book to their patients. Another great resource not listed here is your local bariatric support group! If you haven’t found one yet, contact your Surgery Center of Excellence or your nutritionist, they should be able to give you a good idea of one or two in your area. Or you can check out the list here on Bariatric Pal - it’s a very comprehensive list of support groups around the world!
  24. Does your New Year resolution include Weight Loss Surgery to help you achieve your goals this year? This is a great list of Weight Loss Surgery resources just for you! With the New Year comes the New Year Resolutions. For many people, one of the largest resolutions is a change in lifestyle - that includes losing weight! I remember my resolution in 2012 was to lose weight and get healthy. And I was able to do that with the help of the vertical sleeve. 2015 is going to hold that for many people and thousands of people undergo weight loss surgery to help them achieve their healthy goals for the new year. For those of you that are just thinking about surgery, I want to encourage you to know that you are not alone! You have a wealth of resources at your fingertips. I wanted to take a moment to share with you some amazing resources that you may find helpful on your journey! Websites BariatricPal.com Of course, BariatricPal is one of the very best websites to find information and support. Here there are “rooms” geared for each surgery as well as pages for recipes, articles, and much more. You will find information on everything you might want to know from before surgery to years after. I suggest checking out the Before/After pages for a good dose of motivation and inspiration! 7BitesShow.com 7 Bites is the first cooking series on YouTube geared specifically toward the bariatric community. The website has videos, recipes and blog posts. weightlosssurgerychannel.com Weight Loss Surgery Channel has a collection of videos on everything WLS related weather it be health, food and recipes, and more. BariatricFoodie The Bariatric Foodie has some great recipes for those that still love food, but want to stay on track TheWorldAccordingToEggface Eggface is one of the most popular of the bariatric cooking blogs. You will find great recipes, blog posts and giveaways on her blog. BariatricCookery.com This is a great resource page for everything from recipes to products. Books The “Big Book” series by Alex Breacher and Natalie Stein. There are four books in the series and all are great reads. They have a wealth of information on everything you need to know before, during and after surgery. The very best thing about these books is that they include personal stories from people that have been there. Breaking The Chains: A Guide To Bariatric Surgery by Jennifer DeMoss and Suzette Munson. The ladies of 7Bites pull from their and others’ experiences with weight loss surgery to provide a simplified, but comprehensive guide. Information on everything from how to pick your surgery and doctor to how to survive the first two weeks after surgery are included. The Sleeved Life by Pennie Nicola. This book tells about Pennie’s experience with the Vertical Sleeve procedure and discusses the ins and outs of the surgery from start to finish. Weight Loss Surgery For Dummies. The everything you ever wanted to know and then some guide to all things weight loss surgery. Many, MANY doctors and nurses recommend this book to their patients. Another great resource not listed here is your local bariatric support group! If you haven’t found one yet, contact your Surgery Center of Excellence or your nutritionist, they should be able to give you a good idea of one or two in your area. Or you can check out the list here on Bariatric Pal - it’s a very comprehensive list of support groups around the world!
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