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Paul11011

Gastric Sleeve Patients
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Everything posted by Paul11011

  1. You have exemplified my new favorite saying, "Just because you can do it, does not mean you should do it." You are going to need to change your mind and view of food. For that reason alone stay away from testing the waters. Follow the nutrition plan you were given.
  2. While you're still newly sleeved, take advantage of that "honeymoon" period to make the behavior changes you're going to need to make to carry you through the rest of your life. At first you're going to see changes and rewards come quickly, use these as motivation and reasons to stick with your plan. Journal your food and activity. Learn about metabolism , basal metabolic rate (BMR) and how muscle building positively impacts BMR. Understand that this is going to be work, this is not the easy way out.
  3. Paul11011

    Halloween 2010.JPG

    From the album: Paul11011

  4. Paul11011

    1 Year Post Op Checkup

    On Wednesday I had my 1 year post op visit with the PA (Todd), Dietician (Kristen) and Behaviorist (Scott). I am still sitting here in shock that it has been a year already. I find myself lost in what I can only describe as a surreal state. My physical life is so different today than it was a year ago. I feel better in ways that I never could have imagined. I had a conversation with Todd today about needing to be aware of getting ill (extended flu as an example) because at my current body fat %, I could run a real risk, with such an extended illness, of my body fat get too LOW….TOO LOW….are you kidding me? Does Todd not realize he’s talking to a lifelong super morbidly obese person? How can I even conceive of my body fat getting too low? Surely he is talking about someone else; he cannot be talking about ME. Wow! I guess my life has changed. The meetings with both Scott and Kristen were nice reminders of what I need to focus on and continue to focus on as this journey continues. The first reality is that it will be continuing. I may be at a much lower weight than I was at the beginning, but this is nowhere near the end of the process. I will need to continue to be deliberate and diligent in order to be successful long term. This is a life journey and I can only strive more towards conquering those demons that are still there and need to be actively battled. Complacency and disregard for what I have been taught will only allow those demons to reappear. I feel so fortunate for the things I have learned and the people I have gotten to know over this year. Jan. 10, 2011 (Surgery Day) / Jan. 4, 2012 (1 Year post op checkup) Weight: 456 / 200 BMI: 65.4 / 28.7 Body Fat %: Approx. 44 / 12.9 Health Required Meds: 3 / 0 Neck Measurement: 24” / 15 ½” Chest Measurement: 70” / 44” Waist Measurement: 72” / 40” Hip Measurement: 51” / 40”
  5. Paul11011

    Wow look at me...I'm Obese!

    With my latest weigh-in on Monday I have now dipped under 40 on the BMI scale. So now after being Super Obese and Extremely Obese...I am now just plain ole Obese. What a silly label to be happy about huh? The other realization that I have come to and still trying to come to grips with is that this very likely will be the label I stay at. When I get to my goal weight, I will still have a BMI north of 30, so my prospects of getting to Overweight are pretty slim....man I hate puns.
  6. Paul11011

    General catch up

    Wow, it's been forever since I wrote a blog on here. About time to catch up. Here's the random stuff happening in no particular order. I am now at a weight less than I've been in approximately 12 years. As of Monday June 20, I was at 312lbs. 180lbs less than I was on Nov 23, 2010. 144lbs less than I was on the day of my surgery, Jan 10, 2011. When eating at a resturant I no longer have a fear of being placed in a booth. I am now "light" enough to use the Wii Fit balance board. I have just completed my first college class since 1994. What a difference it makes wanting to be there and knowing I'm paying for the education. At the end of June I will be unemployed for the second time in 15 months and for only the 2nd time in my life. Believe it or not I have mixed emotions about this. The industry which has provided a life for my family and I for nearly 20 years is frankly in the crapper, new construction related building materials. I'm looking at this as an opportunity to reinvent myself and perhaps find my true calling. This should allow me to return to college full time and finish my bachelors degree by next April. My son just turned 18 and graduated from high school. He's now working at KFC and hates it. I am loving it. No better way to learn the value of a good education that having to do shitty manual labor. He can't wait to start college in the fall. I think that's the story in a nut shell. Take care and thanks for reading.
  7. Paul11011

    Just A Photo Update

    Awesome, you look amazing!
  8. On Wednesday I had my 1 year post op visit with the PA (Todd), Dietician (Kristen) and Behaviorist (Scott). I am still sitting here in shock that it has been a year already. I find myself lost in what I can only describe as a surreal state. My physical life is so different today than it was a year ago. I feel better in ways that I never could have imagined. I had a conversation with Todd today about needing to be aware of getting ill (extended flu as an example) because at my current body fat %, I could run a real risk, with such an extended illness, of my body fat get too LOW….TOO LOW….are you kidding me? Does Todd not realize he’s talking to a lifelong super morbidly obese person? How can I even conceive of my body fat getting too low? Surely he is talking about someone else; he cannot be talking about ME. Wow! I guess my life has changed. The meetings with both Scott and Kristen were nice reminders of what I need to focus on and continue to focus on as this journey continues. The first reality is that it will be continuing. I may be at a much lower weight than I was at the beginning, but this is nowhere near the end of the process. I will need to continue to be deliberate and diligent in order to be successful long term. This is a life journey and I can only strive more towards conquering those demons that are still there and need to be actively battled. Complacency and disregard for what I have been taught will only allow those demons to reappear. I feel so fortunate for the things I have learned and the people I have gotten to know over this year. Jan. 10, 2011 (Surgery Day) / Jan. 4, 2012 (1 Year post op checkup) Weight: 456 / 200 BMI: 65.4 / 28.7 Body Fat %: Approx. 44 / 12.9 Health Required Meds: 3 / 0 Neck Measurement: 24” / 15 ½” Chest Measurement: 70” / 44” Waist Measurement: 72” / 40” Hip Measurement: 51” / 40”
  9. Paul11011

    Need Some Sleevers To Relate To!

    Help me get some understanding of what support you have been provided by your hospital or surgeon. Did you get a meal plan for follow up? Have they ran labs so you could know which Vitamins to be taking? If it helps to get your fluids in using the products you mentioned, that is fine. It is very important to be getting in at least 64oz. Dehydration is a bad thing.
  10. Ice cubes will satisfy your need to chew and give you some extra water.
  11. Paul11011

    Lost 201 Pounds

    Awesome! It truly is a life of which we would have never before conceived. Congratulations on finding LIFE again.
  12. Ultimately it is everyone's choice to make, isn't it? I guess for me this journey has been more about learning to make the best choice. I know I made a lot of choices presurgery because something sounded good or I wanted it and that line of reasoning got me to nearly 500 lbs. Maybe I needed a little help realizing how important it is to try to always make the best choice. Will that mean at times I'll feel like I'm missing out on things? Yep. Does that feeling of missout last long when I realize that by trying to make the best possible choice I'm 43% of the size I started at?....Nahhhh I don't think so. In any event, I wish everyone good luck on their chosen path.
  13. Paul11011

    Anybody Else Feel Guilty?

    Guilt and fear are good emotions to feel. They are indicatiors that we are not doing what we know we should be doing. Imagine how destructive it would be if you felt no shame for transgressions. You know what you did wrong, you know that it was not in your best interest to move you toward success and you what you need to do in the future to avoid feeling this way again. Now pick yourself up, stop feeling bad and everytime you have a decision to make view it as an opportunity to be succesful. Many small, correct decisions will lead to very rewarding outcomes.
  14. Paul11011

    Ashamed of WLS?

    I went into this process feeling ashamed of me. I fought for as long as I could to keep myself from facing the reality that WLS was my most viable obtion for having any hope of a longer healthier life. I still feel a bit of a sting of shame when I talk about how much I have lost, because the reality is that I would not have the opportunity to lose so much, had I not been so large. The shame that I once held about my need to have WLS has now been replaced by the joy of having made a decision which has so positively affected my life. I tell everyone that inquires about my loss what I have done. Those that have known me are so excited for me and realize just how much better my life and prospect of health are. There have been a select few that have not openly stated their displeasure, but I sensed from them a sense of it. I have handle those people in one of two ways. If their hesitancy comes from concern for me and ignorance about the process, then I willingly share with them how dire my health had been, the benefits I have seen from the procedure and engauge them in conversations to help them understand my decision. The other group and admittedly there has been just one lady thus far, I have fun with. (insert sinister, evil side here). She is the lady that upon hearing that i had WLS told me she was doing it "the hard way" by doing weight watchers. I asked her if she had done WW before and she told me she had, I asked her how it worked for her, (bet you'll guess) she said, "It worked great while I was on it, but then I gained all that weight back plus more" I said that I was sorry to hear that it did not work for her before and asked her what she planned to do differently this time so that it would stay off. Funny how uncomfortable she became when the table turned. After stammering for a bit, yeah I let her kinda just babble, I said I sure hope it works for you this time. Then I explained that I had came to a realization that my health was important enough that I needed a more effective solution than riding another yo-yo.
  15. I had initial set my goal weight at 220lbs. At the time, being 492, I never thought I would be able to get there. Well I did. On Nov. 14, 2011, 10 months and 4 days after my receiving my sleeve, I weighted in at 220 lbs. It feels great to be here, but now I am reevaluating to see where I want to get to.....what a completely unique idea for me, being able to feel like I have the ability to control what weight I want to live my life. It's still all so surreal. I have decided to reestablish my goal weight at 192lbs. Why? To have something to shoot for because I don't think I'm where I want to be just yet. Additionally 192 would put me at the total lost number of 300lbs. I have a slight numerology interest and 300 just seems like a cool number. Ok, deep breath, appreciate where I've been and where I am going, now back at focusing on doing what I need to do in order to be successful. See you at the next stop. Update: 11/21/11 weigh in, 215lbs.
  16. Paul11011

    9 months post op

    I can not believe it has been 9 months already. I am still incredibly thankful for the progressive I've seen. I can only equate my nine months with the much more famous 9 month period we all know, the progress towards birth. I feel that my journey has very much been a rebirth. I am no longer the person I used to be. Not only am I physically smaller, so many other things are different about me. I have a better attitude about life, feel more confident and resolute in who I am and what my capabilities are. I no longer look first for reasons I can't do something, rather now I'm wondering what can I do. My loss of the emotional crutch I had in food has caused me to be more emotional and deal with those emotions. It has been a wonderful and eventful journey. Here's a wrap up of where I am today: Total weight lost since initial consultation (Nov 23, 2010) -256lbs Weight loss since surgery (Jan 10, 2011) -220lbs Current weight, lowest since 6th grade 236lbs Current weight as a percentage of my beginning weight 48% No longer taking blood pressure meds, cholesterol meds and no longer wear a CPAP. I have shed all the co-mobilities I had at the beginning of this journey. Thank you all for reading and for providing me a very valuable outlet and support on my journey.
  17. Paul11011

    10 month post op

  18. Paul11011

    11/10/2011

    From the album: 10 month post op

  19. Paul11011

    11/10/2011

    From the album: 10 month post op

  20. Paul11011

    11/10/2011

    From the album: 10 month post op

  21. Paul11011

    11/10/2011

    From the album: 10 month post op

  22. You're right the article I posted is not about the sleeve. I have yet to find any scientific proof that the stomach can or for that matter can not be stretched. If you feel it can't drink away, hell I'll buy you a soda. As for me, I have nothing to gain (except weight) from it, so I'm not doing it. If you feel it's not going to affect you, feel free.
  23. Worth reading. Portion significant to this conversation are in bold. "Why Carbonated beverages are "TABOO" after Bariatric Surgery" By: Cynthia Buffington, Ph.D Did you drink carbonated soft drinks prior to your Bariatric surgery? Do you still consume carbonated soft drinks? Were you advised by your surgeon or his/her nutritional staff NOT to drink carbonated drinks after surgery? Do you understand why drinking carbonated beverages, even if sugar-free, could jeopardize your weight loss success and, perhaps even your health? A carbonated beverage is an effervescent drink that releases carbon dioxide under conditions of normal atmospheric pressure. Carbonated drinks include most soft drinks, champagne, beer, and seltzer Water. If you consume a soft drink or other carbonated beverage while eating, the carbonation forces food through he stomach pouch, reducing the time food remains in the pouch. The less time food remains in your stomach pouch, the less satiety (feelings of fullness) you experience, enabling you to eat more with increased risk for weight gain. The gas released from a carbonated beverage might "stretch" your stomach pouch. Food forced through the pouch by the carbonation could also significantly enlarge the size of your stoma (the opening between the stomach pouch and intestines of patients who have had a gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversion). An enlarged pouch or stoma would allow you to eat larger amounts of food at any one setting. In this way, consuming carbonated beverages, even if the drinks are diet or calorie free, may cause weight gain or interfere with maximal weight loss success. Soft drinks may also cause weight gain by reducing the absorption of dietary Calcium. Dietary calcium helps to stimulate fat breakdown and reduce its uptake into adipose tissue. Epidemiological and clinical studies have found a close association between obesity and low dietary calcium intake. Recent studies have found that maintaining sufficient amounts of dietary calcium helps to induce weight loss or prevent weight gain following diet. The high caffeine in carbonated sodas is one way that drinking carbonated soft drinks may reduce the absorption of calcium into the body. Studies have found that caffeine increases urinary calcium content, meaning that high caffeine may interfere with the uptake of dietary calcium into the body. Keep in mind that one 12 oz. can of Mountain Dew has 50 mg of caffeine, and Pepsi and Coke (diet or those with sugar) contain 37 mg of caffeine each. Colas, such as Pepsi and Coke (diet or with sugar), may also cause calcium deficiencies from the high amounts of phosphoric acid that they contain. Phosphate binds to calcium and the bound calcium cannot be absorbed into the body. Both animal and human studies have found that phosphoric acid is associated with altered calcium homeostasis and low calcium. Drinking carbonated beverages may also reduce dietary calcium because these beverages replace milk and other nutrient-containing drinks or foods in the diet. Several studies report inverse (negative) relationships between carbonated beverage usage and the amount of milk (particularly children) consume. Carbonated beverages, then, may reduce dietary calcium because of their high caffeine or phosphoric acid content or because drinking such beverages tends to reduce the consumption of calcium-containing foods and beverages. Such deficiencies in dietary calcium intake may be even more pronounced in Bariatric surgical patients. Calcium deficiencies with Bariatric surgery have been reported following gastric restrictive and/or malabsorptive procedures. The reduced amounts of calcium with bariatric surgery may occur as a result of low nutrient intake, low levels of Vitamin D, or, for patients who have had gastric bypass pr the biliopancreatic diversion (with or without the duodenal switch), from bypass of the portion of the gut where active absorption of calcium normally occurs. Drinking carbonated beverages may further increase the risk for dietary calcium deficiencies and, in this way, hinder maximal weight loss success. For all the reasons described above, including calcium deficits, reduced satiety, enlargement of pouch or stoma, drinking carbonated beverages, even those that are sugar-free, could lead to weight gain. Carbonated beverages that contain sugar, however, pose a substantially greater threat to the Bariatric patient in terms of weight loss and weight loss maintenance with surgery. Sugar-containing soft drinks have a relatively high glycemic index, meaning that blood sugar levels readily increase with their consumption. The rapid rise in blood sugar, in turn, increases the production of the hormone, insulin. , that acts to drive sugar into tissues where it is metabolized or processed for storage. High insulin levels, however, also contribute to fat accumulation, driving fat into the fat storage depots and inhibiting the breakdown of fat. Soft drinks with sugar are also high in calories. An average 12 oz. soft drink contains 10 teaspoons of refined sugar (40g). The typical 12-oz. can of soda contains 150 calories (Coke = 140 calories; Pepsi = 150; Dr. Pepper = 160; orange soda = 180; 7-up = 140; etc.). Soft drinks are the fifth largest source of calories for adults, accounting for 5.6% of all calories that Americans consume. Among adolescents, soft drinks provide 8%- to 9% of calories. An extra 150 calories per day from a soft drink over the course of a year, is equivalent to nearly 16 pounds and that weight gain multiplied by a few years could equate to “morbid obesity”. In addition to the adverse effects that carbonated drinks have on weight loss or weight loss maintenance, carbonated beverages may also have adverse effects on health. Soda beverages and other carbonated drinks are acidic with a pH of 3.0 or less. Drinking these acidic beverages on an empty stomach in the absence of food, as Bariatric patients are required to do, can upset the fragile acid-alkaline balance of the gastric pouch and intestines and increase the risk for ulcers or even the risk for gastrointestinal adenomas (cancer). Soft drink usage has also been found to be associated with various other health problems. These include an increased risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney stones, bone fractures and reduced bone density, allergies, cancer, acid-peptic disease, dental carries, gingivitis, and more. Soft drinks may, in addition, increase the risk for oxidative stress. This condition is believed to contribute significantly to aging and to diseases associated with aging and obesity, i.e. diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, reduced immune function, hypertension, and more. From the above discussion, do you now have a little better understanding of why your Bariatric surgeon or Bariatric nutritionist advised you NOT to consume carbonated sodas after surgery? Your Bariatric surgeon and his/her staff want to see you achieve the best results possible from your surgery – both in terms of weight loss and health status – and so do YOU. Consider the consequences of drinking such beverages now that you understand more clearly why such drinks are “Bariatric taboo”.
  24. What's the upside to going back to having carbonated beverages? I know it's acedotal, but of the people that i have spoken with that had significant regains, the first thing they talk about doing when they "went off the wagon" was starting to drink soda again. I have read so many reports about the determental effects of carbonated drinks, even those that are sugar free, It also makes perfect sense to me that there is the potential for sleeve expansion with the increased gas which will be in the stomach. Additionally be very carefull if carbonated beverages and soda where something you drank alot of in the past. Testing the waters with it now may very well lead to a place you don't want to be. Don't make it a trigger food.
  25. Paul11011

    New attention from the opposite sex......

    Welcome to the fun side of WLS, relationship issues. The first thing I want you to know and I mean really know, is that you have not done anything to him nor done anything wrong. Got that, good, it's not your fault. What is most likely happening is that his underlying insecurities, that he has always had, are now coming to the surface because of the increased attention coming your way (again not your fault). He had previously been content with his insecurities because after all he had you, but the heavier, not likely to leave him you. Now the new you, in his mind has so many more options, that his insecurities are telling him that since you have the new found options, you MUST want to be with somone better than him. Irrational or not (which it is) this is what he is thinking. He is going to have to learn how to deal with his issues, which will be helped by you being supportive and encouraging, but ultimatley he will need to solve for himself. One suggestion I would have is for you to remind him of how great you two have always been, even when you were heavier, and that he deserves to be with the new you, and that the other "options" you have now would have never before been interested. Good luck, but keep in mind this is also a process and will not happen overnight.
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