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Amanda Clark

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  1. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in The Protein Shake Up   
    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    So how much Protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?


    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    Emerging research is suggesting that the distribution of our protein intake throughout the day can be just as important for maintaining muscle mass as the total quantity. One study found that consuming more than 30g of protein at a time provided no additional benefit, with the maximum benefit achieved at 30g.
    Eating enough protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass and function. The older we get the faster our body breaks down our muscle after building it, to the point where we can almost pump ourselves up at the gym and slowly start deflating as we walk out the door. Muscle has an important impact on our metabolic rate, or how many calories our body burns in the day. Our calorie burning ability influences how easy it is to gain, lose or maintain weight.
    So how much protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?
    There are varying recommendations for protein intake following bariatric surgery ( gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric band ) . The recommendations fall within the range of 50 – 80g of protein per day for most people. Taller individuals with higher muscle mass fall towards the top of this range and may even have needs that exceed 80g per day.
    If this protein intake is spaced out between three periods in the day, then this would suggest that 16 – 26g would be ideal within each period, with a maximum of 30g in any period. If a period includes a meal and a snack, then we can divide the day into Breakfast plus morning snack, lunch plus afternoon snack and dinner plus supper snack.
    My assessment of the usual intakes down the track after surgery is that dinner would usually provide an easy opportunity to consume sufficient protein via intake of meat, poultry, fish, egg dishes or legumes such as black Beans or lentils. Breakfast and lunch are the riskier times, where haste and convenience can influence intake.
    Let’s review the protein content of some common breakfast meals that equate to approx. 200 Cals:

    1 slice of toast + ½ cup baked beans + coffee with milk = 10g
    ½ cup high protein Cereal + 3 oz milk + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    1 cup yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    Smoothie with 150 ml fat free milk + 2 Tbsp yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 8g
    Omelette made with 1 large egg + 1 oz grated cheese + vegetables = 15g So, it seems it is not so easy to achieve the maximum of 30g or even 1/3 of the total requirement at breakfast after bariatric surgery, being 16-26g.
    This means that what we eat at the morning snack is going to make or break a well-proportioned daily protein intake.
    Let’s look at some options that can make up the difference and equate to approx. 100 Cals:

    ½ cup cottage cheese + 6 carrot or celery sticks = 21g
    0.7 oz peanuts = 5g
    2 Tbsp Pepitas = 6g
    8 oz fat free milk based coffee eg Cappuccino = 6g
    1 slice cheese with Tomato and cucumber = 7g
    7 oz natural yoghurt = 10g
    Small granola bar = 2g
    ½ Quest Protein Bar or shake = 10g Morning snack options of approx 100 Cals that would not have contributed to achieving the protein target would be:

    1 piece of fruit = 2g
    0.7g mixed fruit and nuts = 2g
    6 carrot sticks and 1/2 cup salsa = 2g
    2.3 oz yoghurt = 2g
    1 cup popcorn = 1g
    2 fruit Cookies = 2g You can see that it would take a little planning but it is achievable. I think the take home message is that mid morning is the time to incorporate a protein based snack such as a half serve of a Protein Shake or bar and that cottage cheese is your friend.
    A similar assessment of lunches reveals:

    1 slice bread + 40g meat + salad = 15g
    1.5 cups meat or legume based Soup = 10g
    90g chicken + salad = 21g
    burger pattie + salad = 21g This places less reliance on the protein content of the snack as the amount of meat consumed at lunch approaches a 100g serve.
    Evening meals planned around the bariatric plate model will result in greater than 20g protein where half the plate is filled with meat, poultry or fish.
    Problems arise where meat is not well tolerated, such as commonly reported in gastric banding and also in other surgeries due to reduced stomach acid from the smaller stomach size or from long-term use of anti reflux medications.
  2. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in The Protein Shake Up   
    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    So how much Protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?


    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    Emerging research is suggesting that the distribution of our protein intake throughout the day can be just as important for maintaining muscle mass as the total quantity. One study found that consuming more than 30g of protein at a time provided no additional benefit, with the maximum benefit achieved at 30g.
    Eating enough protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass and function. The older we get the faster our body breaks down our muscle after building it, to the point where we can almost pump ourselves up at the gym and slowly start deflating as we walk out the door. Muscle has an important impact on our metabolic rate, or how many calories our body burns in the day. Our calorie burning ability influences how easy it is to gain, lose or maintain weight.
    So how much protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?
    There are varying recommendations for protein intake following bariatric surgery ( gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric band ) . The recommendations fall within the range of 50 – 80g of protein per day for most people. Taller individuals with higher muscle mass fall towards the top of this range and may even have needs that exceed 80g per day.
    If this protein intake is spaced out between three periods in the day, then this would suggest that 16 – 26g would be ideal within each period, with a maximum of 30g in any period. If a period includes a meal and a snack, then we can divide the day into Breakfast plus morning snack, lunch plus afternoon snack and dinner plus supper snack.
    My assessment of the usual intakes down the track after surgery is that dinner would usually provide an easy opportunity to consume sufficient protein via intake of meat, poultry, fish, egg dishes or legumes such as black Beans or lentils. Breakfast and lunch are the riskier times, where haste and convenience can influence intake.
    Let’s review the protein content of some common breakfast meals that equate to approx. 200 Cals:

    1 slice of toast + ½ cup baked beans + coffee with milk = 10g
    ½ cup high protein Cereal + 3 oz milk + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    1 cup yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    Smoothie with 150 ml fat free milk + 2 Tbsp yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 8g
    Omelette made with 1 large egg + 1 oz grated cheese + vegetables = 15g So, it seems it is not so easy to achieve the maximum of 30g or even 1/3 of the total requirement at breakfast after bariatric surgery, being 16-26g.
    This means that what we eat at the morning snack is going to make or break a well-proportioned daily protein intake.
    Let’s look at some options that can make up the difference and equate to approx. 100 Cals:

    ½ cup cottage cheese + 6 carrot or celery sticks = 21g
    0.7 oz peanuts = 5g
    2 Tbsp Pepitas = 6g
    8 oz fat free milk based coffee eg Cappuccino = 6g
    1 slice cheese with Tomato and cucumber = 7g
    7 oz natural yoghurt = 10g
    Small granola bar = 2g
    ½ Quest Protein Bar or shake = 10g Morning snack options of approx 100 Cals that would not have contributed to achieving the protein target would be:

    1 piece of fruit = 2g
    0.7g mixed fruit and nuts = 2g
    6 carrot sticks and 1/2 cup salsa = 2g
    2.3 oz yoghurt = 2g
    1 cup popcorn = 1g
    2 fruit Cookies = 2g You can see that it would take a little planning but it is achievable. I think the take home message is that mid morning is the time to incorporate a protein based snack such as a half serve of a Protein Shake or bar and that cottage cheese is your friend.
    A similar assessment of lunches reveals:

    1 slice bread + 40g meat + salad = 15g
    1.5 cups meat or legume based Soup = 10g
    90g chicken + salad = 21g
    burger pattie + salad = 21g This places less reliance on the protein content of the snack as the amount of meat consumed at lunch approaches a 100g serve.
    Evening meals planned around the bariatric plate model will result in greater than 20g protein where half the plate is filled with meat, poultry or fish.
    Problems arise where meat is not well tolerated, such as commonly reported in gastric banding and also in other surgeries due to reduced stomach acid from the smaller stomach size or from long-term use of anti reflux medications.
  3. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in The Protein Shake Up   
    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    So how much Protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?


    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    Emerging research is suggesting that the distribution of our protein intake throughout the day can be just as important for maintaining muscle mass as the total quantity. One study found that consuming more than 30g of protein at a time provided no additional benefit, with the maximum benefit achieved at 30g.
    Eating enough protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass and function. The older we get the faster our body breaks down our muscle after building it, to the point where we can almost pump ourselves up at the gym and slowly start deflating as we walk out the door. Muscle has an important impact on our metabolic rate, or how many calories our body burns in the day. Our calorie burning ability influences how easy it is to gain, lose or maintain weight.
    So how much protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?
    There are varying recommendations for protein intake following bariatric surgery ( gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric band ) . The recommendations fall within the range of 50 – 80g of protein per day for most people. Taller individuals with higher muscle mass fall towards the top of this range and may even have needs that exceed 80g per day.
    If this protein intake is spaced out between three periods in the day, then this would suggest that 16 – 26g would be ideal within each period, with a maximum of 30g in any period. If a period includes a meal and a snack, then we can divide the day into Breakfast plus morning snack, lunch plus afternoon snack and dinner plus supper snack.
    My assessment of the usual intakes down the track after surgery is that dinner would usually provide an easy opportunity to consume sufficient protein via intake of meat, poultry, fish, egg dishes or legumes such as black Beans or lentils. Breakfast and lunch are the riskier times, where haste and convenience can influence intake.
    Let’s review the protein content of some common breakfast meals that equate to approx. 200 Cals:

    1 slice of toast + ½ cup baked beans + coffee with milk = 10g
    ½ cup high protein Cereal + 3 oz milk + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    1 cup yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    Smoothie with 150 ml fat free milk + 2 Tbsp yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 8g
    Omelette made with 1 large egg + 1 oz grated cheese + vegetables = 15g So, it seems it is not so easy to achieve the maximum of 30g or even 1/3 of the total requirement at breakfast after bariatric surgery, being 16-26g.
    This means that what we eat at the morning snack is going to make or break a well-proportioned daily protein intake.
    Let’s look at some options that can make up the difference and equate to approx. 100 Cals:

    ½ cup cottage cheese + 6 carrot or celery sticks = 21g
    0.7 oz peanuts = 5g
    2 Tbsp Pepitas = 6g
    8 oz fat free milk based coffee eg Cappuccino = 6g
    1 slice cheese with Tomato and cucumber = 7g
    7 oz natural yoghurt = 10g
    Small granola bar = 2g
    ½ Quest Protein Bar or shake = 10g Morning snack options of approx 100 Cals that would not have contributed to achieving the protein target would be:

    1 piece of fruit = 2g
    0.7g mixed fruit and nuts = 2g
    6 carrot sticks and 1/2 cup salsa = 2g
    2.3 oz yoghurt = 2g
    1 cup popcorn = 1g
    2 fruit Cookies = 2g You can see that it would take a little planning but it is achievable. I think the take home message is that mid morning is the time to incorporate a protein based snack such as a half serve of a Protein Shake or bar and that cottage cheese is your friend.
    A similar assessment of lunches reveals:

    1 slice bread + 40g meat + salad = 15g
    1.5 cups meat or legume based Soup = 10g
    90g chicken + salad = 21g
    burger pattie + salad = 21g This places less reliance on the protein content of the snack as the amount of meat consumed at lunch approaches a 100g serve.
    Evening meals planned around the bariatric plate model will result in greater than 20g protein where half the plate is filled with meat, poultry or fish.
    Problems arise where meat is not well tolerated, such as commonly reported in gastric banding and also in other surgeries due to reduced stomach acid from the smaller stomach size or from long-term use of anti reflux medications.
  4. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in The Protein Shake Up   
    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    So how much Protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?


    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    Emerging research is suggesting that the distribution of our protein intake throughout the day can be just as important for maintaining muscle mass as the total quantity. One study found that consuming more than 30g of protein at a time provided no additional benefit, with the maximum benefit achieved at 30g.
    Eating enough protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass and function. The older we get the faster our body breaks down our muscle after building it, to the point where we can almost pump ourselves up at the gym and slowly start deflating as we walk out the door. Muscle has an important impact on our metabolic rate, or how many calories our body burns in the day. Our calorie burning ability influences how easy it is to gain, lose or maintain weight.
    So how much protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?
    There are varying recommendations for protein intake following bariatric surgery ( gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric band ) . The recommendations fall within the range of 50 – 80g of protein per day for most people. Taller individuals with higher muscle mass fall towards the top of this range and may even have needs that exceed 80g per day.
    If this protein intake is spaced out between three periods in the day, then this would suggest that 16 – 26g would be ideal within each period, with a maximum of 30g in any period. If a period includes a meal and a snack, then we can divide the day into Breakfast plus morning snack, lunch plus afternoon snack and dinner plus supper snack.
    My assessment of the usual intakes down the track after surgery is that dinner would usually provide an easy opportunity to consume sufficient protein via intake of meat, poultry, fish, egg dishes or legumes such as black Beans or lentils. Breakfast and lunch are the riskier times, where haste and convenience can influence intake.
    Let’s review the protein content of some common breakfast meals that equate to approx. 200 Cals:

    1 slice of toast + ½ cup baked beans + coffee with milk = 10g
    ½ cup high protein Cereal + 3 oz milk + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    1 cup yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    Smoothie with 150 ml fat free milk + 2 Tbsp yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 8g
    Omelette made with 1 large egg + 1 oz grated cheese + vegetables = 15g So, it seems it is not so easy to achieve the maximum of 30g or even 1/3 of the total requirement at breakfast after bariatric surgery, being 16-26g.
    This means that what we eat at the morning snack is going to make or break a well-proportioned daily protein intake.
    Let’s look at some options that can make up the difference and equate to approx. 100 Cals:

    ½ cup cottage cheese + 6 carrot or celery sticks = 21g
    0.7 oz peanuts = 5g
    2 Tbsp Pepitas = 6g
    8 oz fat free milk based coffee eg Cappuccino = 6g
    1 slice cheese with Tomato and cucumber = 7g
    7 oz natural yoghurt = 10g
    Small granola bar = 2g
    ½ Quest Protein Bar or shake = 10g Morning snack options of approx 100 Cals that would not have contributed to achieving the protein target would be:

    1 piece of fruit = 2g
    0.7g mixed fruit and nuts = 2g
    6 carrot sticks and 1/2 cup salsa = 2g
    2.3 oz yoghurt = 2g
    1 cup popcorn = 1g
    2 fruit Cookies = 2g You can see that it would take a little planning but it is achievable. I think the take home message is that mid morning is the time to incorporate a protein based snack such as a half serve of a Protein Shake or bar and that cottage cheese is your friend.
    A similar assessment of lunches reveals:

    1 slice bread + 40g meat + salad = 15g
    1.5 cups meat or legume based Soup = 10g
    90g chicken + salad = 21g
    burger pattie + salad = 21g This places less reliance on the protein content of the snack as the amount of meat consumed at lunch approaches a 100g serve.
    Evening meals planned around the bariatric plate model will result in greater than 20g protein where half the plate is filled with meat, poultry or fish.
    Problems arise where meat is not well tolerated, such as commonly reported in gastric banding and also in other surgeries due to reduced stomach acid from the smaller stomach size or from long-term use of anti reflux medications.
  5. Like
    Amanda Clark reacted to alwaysvegas in The Protein Shake Up   
    Thank you for the post and link to the scientific study. I'd heard 30g Protein thrown around quite a bit, but never did read the actual scientific study!
  6. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in The Protein Shake Up   
    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    So how much Protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?


    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    Emerging research is suggesting that the distribution of our protein intake throughout the day can be just as important for maintaining muscle mass as the total quantity. One study found that consuming more than 30g of protein at a time provided no additional benefit, with the maximum benefit achieved at 30g.
    Eating enough protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass and function. The older we get the faster our body breaks down our muscle after building it, to the point where we can almost pump ourselves up at the gym and slowly start deflating as we walk out the door. Muscle has an important impact on our metabolic rate, or how many calories our body burns in the day. Our calorie burning ability influences how easy it is to gain, lose or maintain weight.
    So how much protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?
    There are varying recommendations for protein intake following bariatric surgery ( gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric band ) . The recommendations fall within the range of 50 – 80g of protein per day for most people. Taller individuals with higher muscle mass fall towards the top of this range and may even have needs that exceed 80g per day.
    If this protein intake is spaced out between three periods in the day, then this would suggest that 16 – 26g would be ideal within each period, with a maximum of 30g in any period. If a period includes a meal and a snack, then we can divide the day into Breakfast plus morning snack, lunch plus afternoon snack and dinner plus supper snack.
    My assessment of the usual intakes down the track after surgery is that dinner would usually provide an easy opportunity to consume sufficient protein via intake of meat, poultry, fish, egg dishes or legumes such as black Beans or lentils. Breakfast and lunch are the riskier times, where haste and convenience can influence intake.
    Let’s review the protein content of some common breakfast meals that equate to approx. 200 Cals:

    1 slice of toast + ½ cup baked beans + coffee with milk = 10g
    ½ cup high protein Cereal + 3 oz milk + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    1 cup yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    Smoothie with 150 ml fat free milk + 2 Tbsp yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 8g
    Omelette made with 1 large egg + 1 oz grated cheese + vegetables = 15g So, it seems it is not so easy to achieve the maximum of 30g or even 1/3 of the total requirement at breakfast after bariatric surgery, being 16-26g.
    This means that what we eat at the morning snack is going to make or break a well-proportioned daily protein intake.
    Let’s look at some options that can make up the difference and equate to approx. 100 Cals:

    ½ cup cottage cheese + 6 carrot or celery sticks = 21g
    0.7 oz peanuts = 5g
    2 Tbsp Pepitas = 6g
    8 oz fat free milk based coffee eg Cappuccino = 6g
    1 slice cheese with Tomato and cucumber = 7g
    7 oz natural yoghurt = 10g
    Small granola bar = 2g
    ½ Quest Protein Bar or shake = 10g Morning snack options of approx 100 Cals that would not have contributed to achieving the protein target would be:

    1 piece of fruit = 2g
    0.7g mixed fruit and nuts = 2g
    6 carrot sticks and 1/2 cup salsa = 2g
    2.3 oz yoghurt = 2g
    1 cup popcorn = 1g
    2 fruit Cookies = 2g You can see that it would take a little planning but it is achievable. I think the take home message is that mid morning is the time to incorporate a protein based snack such as a half serve of a Protein Shake or bar and that cottage cheese is your friend.
    A similar assessment of lunches reveals:

    1 slice bread + 40g meat + salad = 15g
    1.5 cups meat or legume based Soup = 10g
    90g chicken + salad = 21g
    burger pattie + salad = 21g This places less reliance on the protein content of the snack as the amount of meat consumed at lunch approaches a 100g serve.
    Evening meals planned around the bariatric plate model will result in greater than 20g protein where half the plate is filled with meat, poultry or fish.
    Problems arise where meat is not well tolerated, such as commonly reported in gastric banding and also in other surgeries due to reduced stomach acid from the smaller stomach size or from long-term use of anti reflux medications.
  7. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in The Protein Shake Up   
    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    So how much Protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?


    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    Emerging research is suggesting that the distribution of our protein intake throughout the day can be just as important for maintaining muscle mass as the total quantity. One study found that consuming more than 30g of protein at a time provided no additional benefit, with the maximum benefit achieved at 30g.
    Eating enough protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass and function. The older we get the faster our body breaks down our muscle after building it, to the point where we can almost pump ourselves up at the gym and slowly start deflating as we walk out the door. Muscle has an important impact on our metabolic rate, or how many calories our body burns in the day. Our calorie burning ability influences how easy it is to gain, lose or maintain weight.
    So how much protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?
    There are varying recommendations for protein intake following bariatric surgery ( gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric band ) . The recommendations fall within the range of 50 – 80g of protein per day for most people. Taller individuals with higher muscle mass fall towards the top of this range and may even have needs that exceed 80g per day.
    If this protein intake is spaced out between three periods in the day, then this would suggest that 16 – 26g would be ideal within each period, with a maximum of 30g in any period. If a period includes a meal and a snack, then we can divide the day into Breakfast plus morning snack, lunch plus afternoon snack and dinner plus supper snack.
    My assessment of the usual intakes down the track after surgery is that dinner would usually provide an easy opportunity to consume sufficient protein via intake of meat, poultry, fish, egg dishes or legumes such as black Beans or lentils. Breakfast and lunch are the riskier times, where haste and convenience can influence intake.
    Let’s review the protein content of some common breakfast meals that equate to approx. 200 Cals:

    1 slice of toast + ½ cup baked beans + coffee with milk = 10g
    ½ cup high protein Cereal + 3 oz milk + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    1 cup yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    Smoothie with 150 ml fat free milk + 2 Tbsp yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 8g
    Omelette made with 1 large egg + 1 oz grated cheese + vegetables = 15g So, it seems it is not so easy to achieve the maximum of 30g or even 1/3 of the total requirement at breakfast after bariatric surgery, being 16-26g.
    This means that what we eat at the morning snack is going to make or break a well-proportioned daily protein intake.
    Let’s look at some options that can make up the difference and equate to approx. 100 Cals:

    ½ cup cottage cheese + 6 carrot or celery sticks = 21g
    0.7 oz peanuts = 5g
    2 Tbsp Pepitas = 6g
    8 oz fat free milk based coffee eg Cappuccino = 6g
    1 slice cheese with Tomato and cucumber = 7g
    7 oz natural yoghurt = 10g
    Small granola bar = 2g
    ½ Quest Protein Bar or shake = 10g Morning snack options of approx 100 Cals that would not have contributed to achieving the protein target would be:

    1 piece of fruit = 2g
    0.7g mixed fruit and nuts = 2g
    6 carrot sticks and 1/2 cup salsa = 2g
    2.3 oz yoghurt = 2g
    1 cup popcorn = 1g
    2 fruit Cookies = 2g You can see that it would take a little planning but it is achievable. I think the take home message is that mid morning is the time to incorporate a protein based snack such as a half serve of a Protein Shake or bar and that cottage cheese is your friend.
    A similar assessment of lunches reveals:

    1 slice bread + 40g meat + salad = 15g
    1.5 cups meat or legume based Soup = 10g
    90g chicken + salad = 21g
    burger pattie + salad = 21g This places less reliance on the protein content of the snack as the amount of meat consumed at lunch approaches a 100g serve.
    Evening meals planned around the bariatric plate model will result in greater than 20g protein where half the plate is filled with meat, poultry or fish.
    Problems arise where meat is not well tolerated, such as commonly reported in gastric banding and also in other surgeries due to reduced stomach acid from the smaller stomach size or from long-term use of anti reflux medications.
  8. Like
    Amanda Clark reacted to alwaysvegas in Do you have Decision Fatigue?   
    Great article! I often bake my Proteins and vegetables at one time with limited universal spices (garlic powder, onion powder, pepper), but make separate sauces and use different additional seasonings for different meals.
    So my Protein and vegetables can be chicken, broccoli, onions, mushrooms.
    But when I pack my lunch I add alfredo sauce and italian seasonings. And for dinner I use soy sauce, white pepper, ginger, and fish sauce.
    I still make the decision on the sauces and spices daily, but it takes the planning out of the Proteins and veggies! I just change up the proteins and veggies weekly.
  9. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in The Protein Shake Up   
    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    So how much Protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?


    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    Emerging research is suggesting that the distribution of our protein intake throughout the day can be just as important for maintaining muscle mass as the total quantity. One study found that consuming more than 30g of protein at a time provided no additional benefit, with the maximum benefit achieved at 30g.
    Eating enough protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass and function. The older we get the faster our body breaks down our muscle after building it, to the point where we can almost pump ourselves up at the gym and slowly start deflating as we walk out the door. Muscle has an important impact on our metabolic rate, or how many calories our body burns in the day. Our calorie burning ability influences how easy it is to gain, lose or maintain weight.
    So how much protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?
    There are varying recommendations for protein intake following bariatric surgery ( gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric band ) . The recommendations fall within the range of 50 – 80g of protein per day for most people. Taller individuals with higher muscle mass fall towards the top of this range and may even have needs that exceed 80g per day.
    If this protein intake is spaced out between three periods in the day, then this would suggest that 16 – 26g would be ideal within each period, with a maximum of 30g in any period. If a period includes a meal and a snack, then we can divide the day into Breakfast plus morning snack, lunch plus afternoon snack and dinner plus supper snack.
    My assessment of the usual intakes down the track after surgery is that dinner would usually provide an easy opportunity to consume sufficient protein via intake of meat, poultry, fish, egg dishes or legumes such as black Beans or lentils. Breakfast and lunch are the riskier times, where haste and convenience can influence intake.
    Let’s review the protein content of some common breakfast meals that equate to approx. 200 Cals:

    1 slice of toast + ½ cup baked beans + coffee with milk = 10g
    ½ cup high protein Cereal + 3 oz milk + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    1 cup yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    Smoothie with 150 ml fat free milk + 2 Tbsp yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 8g
    Omelette made with 1 large egg + 1 oz grated cheese + vegetables = 15g So, it seems it is not so easy to achieve the maximum of 30g or even 1/3 of the total requirement at breakfast after bariatric surgery, being 16-26g.
    This means that what we eat at the morning snack is going to make or break a well-proportioned daily protein intake.
    Let’s look at some options that can make up the difference and equate to approx. 100 Cals:

    ½ cup cottage cheese + 6 carrot or celery sticks = 21g
    0.7 oz peanuts = 5g
    2 Tbsp Pepitas = 6g
    8 oz fat free milk based coffee eg Cappuccino = 6g
    1 slice cheese with Tomato and cucumber = 7g
    7 oz natural yoghurt = 10g
    Small granola bar = 2g
    ½ Quest Protein Bar or shake = 10g Morning snack options of approx 100 Cals that would not have contributed to achieving the protein target would be:

    1 piece of fruit = 2g
    0.7g mixed fruit and nuts = 2g
    6 carrot sticks and 1/2 cup salsa = 2g
    2.3 oz yoghurt = 2g
    1 cup popcorn = 1g
    2 fruit Cookies = 2g You can see that it would take a little planning but it is achievable. I think the take home message is that mid morning is the time to incorporate a protein based snack such as a half serve of a Protein Shake or bar and that cottage cheese is your friend.
    A similar assessment of lunches reveals:

    1 slice bread + 40g meat + salad = 15g
    1.5 cups meat or legume based Soup = 10g
    90g chicken + salad = 21g
    burger pattie + salad = 21g This places less reliance on the protein content of the snack as the amount of meat consumed at lunch approaches a 100g serve.
    Evening meals planned around the bariatric plate model will result in greater than 20g protein where half the plate is filled with meat, poultry or fish.
    Problems arise where meat is not well tolerated, such as commonly reported in gastric banding and also in other surgeries due to reduced stomach acid from the smaller stomach size or from long-term use of anti reflux medications.
  10. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in The Protein Shake Up   
    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    So how much Protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?


    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    Emerging research is suggesting that the distribution of our protein intake throughout the day can be just as important for maintaining muscle mass as the total quantity. One study found that consuming more than 30g of protein at a time provided no additional benefit, with the maximum benefit achieved at 30g.
    Eating enough protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass and function. The older we get the faster our body breaks down our muscle after building it, to the point where we can almost pump ourselves up at the gym and slowly start deflating as we walk out the door. Muscle has an important impact on our metabolic rate, or how many calories our body burns in the day. Our calorie burning ability influences how easy it is to gain, lose or maintain weight.
    So how much protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?
    There are varying recommendations for protein intake following bariatric surgery ( gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric band ) . The recommendations fall within the range of 50 – 80g of protein per day for most people. Taller individuals with higher muscle mass fall towards the top of this range and may even have needs that exceed 80g per day.
    If this protein intake is spaced out between three periods in the day, then this would suggest that 16 – 26g would be ideal within each period, with a maximum of 30g in any period. If a period includes a meal and a snack, then we can divide the day into Breakfast plus morning snack, lunch plus afternoon snack and dinner plus supper snack.
    My assessment of the usual intakes down the track after surgery is that dinner would usually provide an easy opportunity to consume sufficient protein via intake of meat, poultry, fish, egg dishes or legumes such as black Beans or lentils. Breakfast and lunch are the riskier times, where haste and convenience can influence intake.
    Let’s review the protein content of some common breakfast meals that equate to approx. 200 Cals:

    1 slice of toast + ½ cup baked beans + coffee with milk = 10g
    ½ cup high protein Cereal + 3 oz milk + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    1 cup yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    Smoothie with 150 ml fat free milk + 2 Tbsp yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 8g
    Omelette made with 1 large egg + 1 oz grated cheese + vegetables = 15g So, it seems it is not so easy to achieve the maximum of 30g or even 1/3 of the total requirement at breakfast after bariatric surgery, being 16-26g.
    This means that what we eat at the morning snack is going to make or break a well-proportioned daily protein intake.
    Let’s look at some options that can make up the difference and equate to approx. 100 Cals:

    ½ cup cottage cheese + 6 carrot or celery sticks = 21g
    0.7 oz peanuts = 5g
    2 Tbsp Pepitas = 6g
    8 oz fat free milk based coffee eg Cappuccino = 6g
    1 slice cheese with Tomato and cucumber = 7g
    7 oz natural yoghurt = 10g
    Small granola bar = 2g
    ½ Quest Protein Bar or shake = 10g Morning snack options of approx 100 Cals that would not have contributed to achieving the protein target would be:

    1 piece of fruit = 2g
    0.7g mixed fruit and nuts = 2g
    6 carrot sticks and 1/2 cup salsa = 2g
    2.3 oz yoghurt = 2g
    1 cup popcorn = 1g
    2 fruit Cookies = 2g You can see that it would take a little planning but it is achievable. I think the take home message is that mid morning is the time to incorporate a protein based snack such as a half serve of a Protein Shake or bar and that cottage cheese is your friend.
    A similar assessment of lunches reveals:

    1 slice bread + 40g meat + salad = 15g
    1.5 cups meat or legume based Soup = 10g
    90g chicken + salad = 21g
    burger pattie + salad = 21g This places less reliance on the protein content of the snack as the amount of meat consumed at lunch approaches a 100g serve.
    Evening meals planned around the bariatric plate model will result in greater than 20g protein where half the plate is filled with meat, poultry or fish.
    Problems arise where meat is not well tolerated, such as commonly reported in gastric banding and also in other surgeries due to reduced stomach acid from the smaller stomach size or from long-term use of anti reflux medications.
  11. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in The Protein Shake Up   
    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    So how much Protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?


    Protein’s importance is widely recognized in bariatric surgery because requirements are at least as high after surgery as before, yet stomachs are so much smaller.
    Emerging research is suggesting that the distribution of our protein intake throughout the day can be just as important for maintaining muscle mass as the total quantity. One study found that consuming more than 30g of protein at a time provided no additional benefit, with the maximum benefit achieved at 30g.
    Eating enough protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass and function. The older we get the faster our body breaks down our muscle after building it, to the point where we can almost pump ourselves up at the gym and slowly start deflating as we walk out the door. Muscle has an important impact on our metabolic rate, or how many calories our body burns in the day. Our calorie burning ability influences how easy it is to gain, lose or maintain weight.
    So how much protein do we need and can we get enough at each meal without only eating meat?
    There are varying recommendations for protein intake following bariatric surgery ( gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric band ) . The recommendations fall within the range of 50 – 80g of protein per day for most people. Taller individuals with higher muscle mass fall towards the top of this range and may even have needs that exceed 80g per day.
    If this protein intake is spaced out between three periods in the day, then this would suggest that 16 – 26g would be ideal within each period, with a maximum of 30g in any period. If a period includes a meal and a snack, then we can divide the day into Breakfast plus morning snack, lunch plus afternoon snack and dinner plus supper snack.
    My assessment of the usual intakes down the track after surgery is that dinner would usually provide an easy opportunity to consume sufficient protein via intake of meat, poultry, fish, egg dishes or legumes such as black Beans or lentils. Breakfast and lunch are the riskier times, where haste and convenience can influence intake.
    Let’s review the protein content of some common breakfast meals that equate to approx. 200 Cals:

    1 slice of toast + ½ cup baked beans + coffee with milk = 10g
    ½ cup high protein Cereal + 3 oz milk + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    1 cup yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 14g
    Smoothie with 150 ml fat free milk + 2 Tbsp yoghurt + ¼ cup fruit = 8g
    Omelette made with 1 large egg + 1 oz grated cheese + vegetables = 15g So, it seems it is not so easy to achieve the maximum of 30g or even 1/3 of the total requirement at breakfast after bariatric surgery, being 16-26g.
    This means that what we eat at the morning snack is going to make or break a well-proportioned daily protein intake.
    Let’s look at some options that can make up the difference and equate to approx. 100 Cals:

    ½ cup cottage cheese + 6 carrot or celery sticks = 21g
    0.7 oz peanuts = 5g
    2 Tbsp Pepitas = 6g
    8 oz fat free milk based coffee eg Cappuccino = 6g
    1 slice cheese with Tomato and cucumber = 7g
    7 oz natural yoghurt = 10g
    Small granola bar = 2g
    ½ Quest Protein Bar or shake = 10g Morning snack options of approx 100 Cals that would not have contributed to achieving the protein target would be:

    1 piece of fruit = 2g
    0.7g mixed fruit and nuts = 2g
    6 carrot sticks and 1/2 cup salsa = 2g
    2.3 oz yoghurt = 2g
    1 cup popcorn = 1g
    2 fruit Cookies = 2g You can see that it would take a little planning but it is achievable. I think the take home message is that mid morning is the time to incorporate a protein based snack such as a half serve of a Protein Shake or bar and that cottage cheese is your friend.
    A similar assessment of lunches reveals:

    1 slice bread + 40g meat + salad = 15g
    1.5 cups meat or legume based Soup = 10g
    90g chicken + salad = 21g
    burger pattie + salad = 21g This places less reliance on the protein content of the snack as the amount of meat consumed at lunch approaches a 100g serve.
    Evening meals planned around the bariatric plate model will result in greater than 20g protein where half the plate is filled with meat, poultry or fish.
    Problems arise where meat is not well tolerated, such as commonly reported in gastric banding and also in other surgeries due to reduced stomach acid from the smaller stomach size or from long-term use of anti reflux medications.
  12. Like
    Amanda Clark reacted to Alex Brecher in Nutritional Deficiencies and Weight Loss Surgery (WLS) – What to Know   
    Nutritional deficiencies are a major concern after weight loss surgery.
    You eat less food, so you eat fewer nutrients.
    Sleeve and bypass patients absorb fewer nutrients.
    You eat less fat, which makes it harder to absorb fat-soluble nutrients like Vitamin A.
    Some bariatric surgery patients take one or two Multivitamins, plus an entire barrage of high-dose Vitamin and mineral supplements. Others barely take any supplements. Which should you be taking? How do you even know whether you need a supplement? Can you prevent deficiencies just by eating a better diet?


    VITAMIN A – Vision, immunity, and healthy red blood cells
    Risk for Deficiency
    Nutrient malabsorption procedures: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, gastric sleeve, BPD-DS
    Very low-fat diet

    Food Sources
    Orange fruits (mango, cantaloupe)
    Orange vegetables (carrots, sweet potatoes,
    Green vegetables (kale, spinach)
    Liver

    Deficiency Information
    Blood test: serum retinol (vitamin A)
    Consequences of deficiency: impaired vision; changes in Iron metabolism

    Supplement Notes
    High doses can be toxic – take only if your doctor prescribes them.

    VITAMIN D – Calcium metabolism and bone health, affects immune function and heart health
    Risk for Deficiency
    Nutrient malabsorption procedures: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, gastric sleeve, BPD-DS
    Very low-fat diet
    Little skin exposure to sun, live in northern climate, or older age

    Food Sources
    Fatty fish (salmon, herring, mackerel)
    Fortified milk
    Egg yolks (if you are a bariatric surgery patient, you might mostly be eating egg whites)
    Some fortified cereals

    Deficiency Information
    Blood test: 25-hydroxyvitamin D
    Consequences of deficiency: osteoporosis (low bone mineral density and higher risk for fractures); possible higher risk for heart disease

    Supplement Notes
    High doses can be toxic – take only if your doctor prescribes them.
    Need for supplementation is very common.

    VITAMIN B12 – Healthy red blood cells, homocysteine metabolism (important in heart health)
    Risk for Deficiency
    WLS that reduces nutrient absorption: gastric bypass, gastric sleeve, BPD-DS.
    Plant-based diet.
    Heavy bleeding: e.g., complication after WLS)
    Older age

    Food Sources
    Animal-based foods: meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, eggs
    Some fortified cereals

    Deficiency Information
    Blood test: vitamin B12
    Blood test: CBC (complete blood count)
    Consequences of deficiency: risk of heart disease; megaloblastic anemia; permanent neurological damage; osteoporosis; depression

    Supplement Notes
    High doses not likely to be toxic.
    Supplements may be necessary if you are on antacids such as proton pump inhibitors

    FOLIC ACID – Healthy red blood cells, homocysteine metabolism (important in heart health), prevention of neural tube defects (for pregnant women)
    Risk for Deficiency
    Nutrient malabsorption procedures: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, gastric sleeve, BPD-DS
    Low dietary intake – especially when grain intake is low after weight loss surgery

    Food Sources
    Fortified grains (most grains in the U.S.): including spaghetti, bread, cereal
    Lentils
    Asparagus
    Orange juice
    Spinach
    Lima beans

    Deficiency Information
    Blood test: serum folate
    Blood test: homocysteine
    Consequences of deficiency: cognitive dysfunction; neural tube defects; megaloblastic anemia

    Supplement Notes
    High doses can hide vitamin B12 deficiencies.

    CALCIUM – Bone health, muscle function
    Risk for Deficiency
    Nutrient malabsorption procedures: Roux-en-Y, gastric bypass, BPD-DS
    Diet low in dairy products – either because of lactose intolerance or other reasons (such as avoiding milk because of the calories).

    Food Sources
    Dairy products: milk, cheese, yogurt (choose fat-free)
    Fortified milk substitutes (almond milk, soy milk)
    Fortified orange juice
    Canned bony fish (salmon, sardines)
    Green leafy vegetables (absorption is poor)
    Some fortified cereals
    Tofu

    Deficiency Information
    Blood test: calcium levels – note: this is not a good test for adequate calcium! You can have normal test results and still not have enough calcium in your diet!
    Dietary intake analysis: see if you get at least 1,200 to 1,500 milligrams per day from your diet.
    Rough estimate of dietary intake: at least 4 servings of high-calcium foods each day
    Consequences of deficiency: decreased bone mineral density (osteoporosis and higher risk for bone fractures)

    Supplement Notes
    Taking too much calcium can cause kidney stones and be bad for the heart.
    Ask your doctor how much calcium you should take in a Multivitamin and as a calcium (or calcium and Vitamin D or calcium and magnesium) supplement.
    Don’t take your calcium supplement at the same time as iron because you will interfere with absorption

    IRON – Healthy red blood cells, energy and other metabolism
    Risk for Deficiency
    Nutrient malabsorption procedures: Roux-en-Y, gastric bypass, BPD-DS
    Vegetarian or vegan (plant-based) diet
    Adolescents and women of child-bearing age.
    Individuals with excessive bleeding (such as with a post-op complication)

    Food Sources
    Fortified grains (most grains in the U.S.): including spaghetti, bread, cereal
    Meat, seafood, and poultry (animal-based sources have a more absorbable form of iron)
    Beans and lentils
    Green vegetables, such as spinach, kale, broccoli
    Potatoes
    Raisins
    Deficiency Information
    Blood test: serum iron/Fe
    Blood test: ferritin
    Blood test: total iron binding capacity (TIBC) (high value means low iron status)
    Blood test: hemoglobin and hematocrit

    Supplement Notes
    Iron supplements can be toxic even if your dose is not that high. Don’t take them unless your doctor prescribes them.
    That includes iron in multivitamins.
    Don’t take iron supplements at the together with calcium supplements.
    Try to take supplements with Vitamin C (in food or as a supplement) to increase absorption.

    THE OTHERS
    The above deficiencies are most common among weight loss surgery patients, but other deficiencies are possible. You are at risk because of your low food intake as you restrict calories. Malabsorptive procedures, such as gastric bypass and gastric sleeve, also put you at risk. Ask your doctor if you are concerned about any of the following Vitamins and minerals. Often, a simple blood test or even a run-through of your daily diet can help you figure out if you need an additional supplement over your daily multivitamin and mineral supplement.
    B vitamins: B1 (thiamin), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin)
    Vitamin C
    Vitamin K
    Magnesium
    Zinc

    The Bottom Line
    Nutritional deficiencies are a big risk after weight loss surgery, but they depend on a few different factors.
    Type of weight loss surgery – sleeve and bypass patients are more prone to nutrient deficiencies than lap-band patients.
    Your diet – eat Protein first and choose nutritious foods to lower your risk of deficiencies.
    Genetics and other uncontrollable factors – women are more likely to need iron supplements, for example, than men.

    Megadoses of vitamin and minerals can be toxic, so don’t prescribe them for yourself. Instead, contact your surgeon or regular doctor. Simple tests can often let you know your nutrient status so you can know which nutrients to supplement.
  13. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in Sugary Drink Pictures   
    Surveys show that the general public thinks that Vitamin Water, fruit juice drinks and sports drinks are healthful options for themselves and their children. Here's a comparison of the number of teaspoons of added sugar in a variety of common drinks.


    Images:
    Note these images reflect the amount of added sugar per container and have had natural sugars deducted from the totals. Natural sugars include naturally occurring glucose and fructose in fruit based drinks and lactose in milk.
    Soda / Soft Drink, 375ml can = 10 tsp
    Cordial mixed 1 :5, 200ml glass = 4 tsp
    Energy Drink - 600ml = 12 tsp, 300ml = 6 tsp
    Vitamin Water, 600ml = 5 1/2 tsp
    Sports Drink, 600ml = 11 tsp
    Iced Tea, 600ml = 7 tsp
    Fruit juice drink, 250ml = 6 tsp
    Flavoured milk, 300ml = 4 tsp, 600ml = 8 tsp
    Vegetable juice, 200l = 0 tsp
    100% juice, 250ml = 0tsp
    Note: We recommend that 100% juice be limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted by 2 pieces of fruit for the value of the fibre contained in the whole fruit.
    Our previous article identified that the target for children is 7 tsp per day. This could be used up by a low sugar Cereal at Breakfast and a cup of fruit juice drink at lunch. How much sugar do your children or grandchildren drink?
  14. Like
    Amanda Clark reacted to Alex Brecher in Sugary Drink Pictures   
    Amanda, Thanks for this great visual. It always helps to see an image to help understand exactly how much sugar we are talking about. It is shocking how much sugar is in some of these beverages. coffee beverages are another high-sugar beverage – for example, a latte can have 20 or more grams of sugar. Another way to help put these high-sugar beverages in perspective is to compare them to sweets – something like a cookie might have 20 grams of sugar – or less than the amount in a soda.

  15. Like
    Amanda Clark reacted to Alex Brecher in Sugary Drink Pictures   
    My son created something very similar for his 4th-grade science project:

    Makes me so proud!
  16. Like
    Amanda Clark reacted to Djmohr in Sugary Drink Pictures   
    And this is why the only thing I drink is water! Besides having that little bit of actual fruit once in a while tastes so much better than a glass of juice.
  17. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Djmohr in Sugar- start with the children   
    Sugar seems to be the talk of the town and celebrities claim to be avoiding it completely. We all know it's not great but how much is too much for us and our children. How do we help our children to be more discerning?


    A recent intake survey in the US which was published in The Journal of Public Health showed that almost everyone (96%) had given their child a sugary drink in the previous month. Categories included fruit juice drinks ( eg. 25% juice) / Carbonated sugary drinks / Sports Drinks / Flavoured Water eg. Vitamin Water / Energy Drinks / Iced Tea so it seems we’re all doing it. Some more than others with the most common choice being fruit juice drinks or carbonated soda / soft drinks.
    Parents answered questions on which drinks they believed to be healthy alternatives to water. Almost all identified 100% fruit juice and milk as healthy options ( note that even 100% juice is ideally limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted for 2 pieces of actual fruit so that fibre is consumed.)Many parents also reported that fruit juice drink, vitamin water or sports drink were also healthy options but are they right?
    The World Health Organisation has recommended that all nations reduce their intake of added sugars to 10% of calories and suggest it would be even better if we could make it down to 5%.
    To put this into perspective, if we just take the 10% goal this sets a target of:
    Men: 12 – 14 tsp added sugar per day
    Women: 10 tsp added sugar per day
    Children: 7 tsp added sugar per day.
    This still sounds like a reasonably generous limit until we look in children’s lunchboxes and find well meaning parents providing a 250ml fruit juice drink with 6tsp in that alone
    The current estimates suggest that the average American consumes 32 tsp of added sugar per day and the average Australian consumes 25 tsp. About half of this intake comes from sugary drinks. We are way off the mark. Never mind the current trend to aim to cut out sugar altogether, just getting it down to 10% is going to be a battle.
    We need to start young with our children and give them water to drink.
    When my children were young, I gave them pocket money and if we were out and they requested a sugary drink or a fast food meal – I let them choose whether to buy that with their own money or I would be happy to pay for water or a sandwich. I found this an easy option for kids to decide how important those foods were to them. Usually they went with the healthy meal option but they knew they were free to choose, so there was no deprivation involved and no tantrums.
    Stay tuned for the next entry showing clearly the number of teaspoons of sugar in various drinks so you can be on the lookout for unintended sugar.
    What strategies do you use to encourage water or milk intake amongst the children in your life?
  18. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Djmohr in Sugar- start with the children   
    Sugar seems to be the talk of the town and celebrities claim to be avoiding it completely. We all know it's not great but how much is too much for us and our children. How do we help our children to be more discerning?


    A recent intake survey in the US which was published in The Journal of Public Health showed that almost everyone (96%) had given their child a sugary drink in the previous month. Categories included fruit juice drinks ( eg. 25% juice) / Carbonated sugary drinks / Sports Drinks / Flavoured Water eg. Vitamin Water / Energy Drinks / Iced Tea so it seems we’re all doing it. Some more than others with the most common choice being fruit juice drinks or carbonated soda / soft drinks.
    Parents answered questions on which drinks they believed to be healthy alternatives to water. Almost all identified 100% fruit juice and milk as healthy options ( note that even 100% juice is ideally limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted for 2 pieces of actual fruit so that fibre is consumed.)Many parents also reported that fruit juice drink, vitamin water or sports drink were also healthy options but are they right?
    The World Health Organisation has recommended that all nations reduce their intake of added sugars to 10% of calories and suggest it would be even better if we could make it down to 5%.
    To put this into perspective, if we just take the 10% goal this sets a target of:
    Men: 12 – 14 tsp added sugar per day
    Women: 10 tsp added sugar per day
    Children: 7 tsp added sugar per day.
    This still sounds like a reasonably generous limit until we look in children’s lunchboxes and find well meaning parents providing a 250ml fruit juice drink with 6tsp in that alone
    The current estimates suggest that the average American consumes 32 tsp of added sugar per day and the average Australian consumes 25 tsp. About half of this intake comes from sugary drinks. We are way off the mark. Never mind the current trend to aim to cut out sugar altogether, just getting it down to 10% is going to be a battle.
    We need to start young with our children and give them water to drink.
    When my children were young, I gave them pocket money and if we were out and they requested a sugary drink or a fast food meal – I let them choose whether to buy that with their own money or I would be happy to pay for water or a sandwich. I found this an easy option for kids to decide how important those foods were to them. Usually they went with the healthy meal option but they knew they were free to choose, so there was no deprivation involved and no tantrums.
    Stay tuned for the next entry showing clearly the number of teaspoons of sugar in various drinks so you can be on the lookout for unintended sugar.
    What strategies do you use to encourage water or milk intake amongst the children in your life?
  19. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Djmohr in Sugar- start with the children   
    Sugar seems to be the talk of the town and celebrities claim to be avoiding it completely. We all know it's not great but how much is too much for us and our children. How do we help our children to be more discerning?


    A recent intake survey in the US which was published in The Journal of Public Health showed that almost everyone (96%) had given their child a sugary drink in the previous month. Categories included fruit juice drinks ( eg. 25% juice) / Carbonated sugary drinks / Sports Drinks / Flavoured Water eg. Vitamin Water / Energy Drinks / Iced Tea so it seems we’re all doing it. Some more than others with the most common choice being fruit juice drinks or carbonated soda / soft drinks.
    Parents answered questions on which drinks they believed to be healthy alternatives to water. Almost all identified 100% fruit juice and milk as healthy options ( note that even 100% juice is ideally limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted for 2 pieces of actual fruit so that fibre is consumed.)Many parents also reported that fruit juice drink, vitamin water or sports drink were also healthy options but are they right?
    The World Health Organisation has recommended that all nations reduce their intake of added sugars to 10% of calories and suggest it would be even better if we could make it down to 5%.
    To put this into perspective, if we just take the 10% goal this sets a target of:
    Men: 12 – 14 tsp added sugar per day
    Women: 10 tsp added sugar per day
    Children: 7 tsp added sugar per day.
    This still sounds like a reasonably generous limit until we look in children’s lunchboxes and find well meaning parents providing a 250ml fruit juice drink with 6tsp in that alone
    The current estimates suggest that the average American consumes 32 tsp of added sugar per day and the average Australian consumes 25 tsp. About half of this intake comes from sugary drinks. We are way off the mark. Never mind the current trend to aim to cut out sugar altogether, just getting it down to 10% is going to be a battle.
    We need to start young with our children and give them water to drink.
    When my children were young, I gave them pocket money and if we were out and they requested a sugary drink or a fast food meal – I let them choose whether to buy that with their own money or I would be happy to pay for water or a sandwich. I found this an easy option for kids to decide how important those foods were to them. Usually they went with the healthy meal option but they knew they were free to choose, so there was no deprivation involved and no tantrums.
    Stay tuned for the next entry showing clearly the number of teaspoons of sugar in various drinks so you can be on the lookout for unintended sugar.
    What strategies do you use to encourage water or milk intake amongst the children in your life?
  20. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in Sugary Drink Pictures   
    Surveys show that the general public thinks that Vitamin Water, fruit juice drinks and sports drinks are healthful options for themselves and their children. Here's a comparison of the number of teaspoons of added sugar in a variety of common drinks.


    Images:
    Note these images reflect the amount of added sugar per container and have had natural sugars deducted from the totals. Natural sugars include naturally occurring glucose and fructose in fruit based drinks and lactose in milk.
    Soda / Soft Drink, 375ml can = 10 tsp
    Cordial mixed 1 :5, 200ml glass = 4 tsp
    Energy Drink - 600ml = 12 tsp, 300ml = 6 tsp
    Vitamin Water, 600ml = 5 1/2 tsp
    Sports Drink, 600ml = 11 tsp
    Iced Tea, 600ml = 7 tsp
    Fruit juice drink, 250ml = 6 tsp
    Flavoured milk, 300ml = 4 tsp, 600ml = 8 tsp
    Vegetable juice, 200l = 0 tsp
    100% juice, 250ml = 0tsp
    Note: We recommend that 100% juice be limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted by 2 pieces of fruit for the value of the fibre contained in the whole fruit.
    Our previous article identified that the target for children is 7 tsp per day. This could be used up by a low sugar Cereal at Breakfast and a cup of fruit juice drink at lunch. How much sugar do your children or grandchildren drink?
  21. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Djmohr in Sugar- start with the children   
    Sugar seems to be the talk of the town and celebrities claim to be avoiding it completely. We all know it's not great but how much is too much for us and our children. How do we help our children to be more discerning?


    A recent intake survey in the US which was published in The Journal of Public Health showed that almost everyone (96%) had given their child a sugary drink in the previous month. Categories included fruit juice drinks ( eg. 25% juice) / Carbonated sugary drinks / Sports Drinks / Flavoured Water eg. Vitamin Water / Energy Drinks / Iced Tea so it seems we’re all doing it. Some more than others with the most common choice being fruit juice drinks or carbonated soda / soft drinks.
    Parents answered questions on which drinks they believed to be healthy alternatives to water. Almost all identified 100% fruit juice and milk as healthy options ( note that even 100% juice is ideally limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted for 2 pieces of actual fruit so that fibre is consumed.)Many parents also reported that fruit juice drink, vitamin water or sports drink were also healthy options but are they right?
    The World Health Organisation has recommended that all nations reduce their intake of added sugars to 10% of calories and suggest it would be even better if we could make it down to 5%.
    To put this into perspective, if we just take the 10% goal this sets a target of:
    Men: 12 – 14 tsp added sugar per day
    Women: 10 tsp added sugar per day
    Children: 7 tsp added sugar per day.
    This still sounds like a reasonably generous limit until we look in children’s lunchboxes and find well meaning parents providing a 250ml fruit juice drink with 6tsp in that alone
    The current estimates suggest that the average American consumes 32 tsp of added sugar per day and the average Australian consumes 25 tsp. About half of this intake comes from sugary drinks. We are way off the mark. Never mind the current trend to aim to cut out sugar altogether, just getting it down to 10% is going to be a battle.
    We need to start young with our children and give them water to drink.
    When my children were young, I gave them pocket money and if we were out and they requested a sugary drink or a fast food meal – I let them choose whether to buy that with their own money or I would be happy to pay for water or a sandwich. I found this an easy option for kids to decide how important those foods were to them. Usually they went with the healthy meal option but they knew they were free to choose, so there was no deprivation involved and no tantrums.
    Stay tuned for the next entry showing clearly the number of teaspoons of sugar in various drinks so you can be on the lookout for unintended sugar.
    What strategies do you use to encourage water or milk intake amongst the children in your life?
  22. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Djmohr in Sugar- start with the children   
    Sugar seems to be the talk of the town and celebrities claim to be avoiding it completely. We all know it's not great but how much is too much for us and our children. How do we help our children to be more discerning?


    A recent intake survey in the US which was published in The Journal of Public Health showed that almost everyone (96%) had given their child a sugary drink in the previous month. Categories included fruit juice drinks ( eg. 25% juice) / Carbonated sugary drinks / Sports Drinks / Flavoured Water eg. Vitamin Water / Energy Drinks / Iced Tea so it seems we’re all doing it. Some more than others with the most common choice being fruit juice drinks or carbonated soda / soft drinks.
    Parents answered questions on which drinks they believed to be healthy alternatives to water. Almost all identified 100% fruit juice and milk as healthy options ( note that even 100% juice is ideally limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted for 2 pieces of actual fruit so that fibre is consumed.)Many parents also reported that fruit juice drink, vitamin water or sports drink were also healthy options but are they right?
    The World Health Organisation has recommended that all nations reduce their intake of added sugars to 10% of calories and suggest it would be even better if we could make it down to 5%.
    To put this into perspective, if we just take the 10% goal this sets a target of:
    Men: 12 – 14 tsp added sugar per day
    Women: 10 tsp added sugar per day
    Children: 7 tsp added sugar per day.
    This still sounds like a reasonably generous limit until we look in children’s lunchboxes and find well meaning parents providing a 250ml fruit juice drink with 6tsp in that alone
    The current estimates suggest that the average American consumes 32 tsp of added sugar per day and the average Australian consumes 25 tsp. About half of this intake comes from sugary drinks. We are way off the mark. Never mind the current trend to aim to cut out sugar altogether, just getting it down to 10% is going to be a battle.
    We need to start young with our children and give them water to drink.
    When my children were young, I gave them pocket money and if we were out and they requested a sugary drink or a fast food meal – I let them choose whether to buy that with their own money or I would be happy to pay for water or a sandwich. I found this an easy option for kids to decide how important those foods were to them. Usually they went with the healthy meal option but they knew they were free to choose, so there was no deprivation involved and no tantrums.
    Stay tuned for the next entry showing clearly the number of teaspoons of sugar in various drinks so you can be on the lookout for unintended sugar.
    What strategies do you use to encourage water or milk intake amongst the children in your life?
  23. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Alex Brecher in Sugary Drink Pictures   
    Surveys show that the general public thinks that Vitamin Water, fruit juice drinks and sports drinks are healthful options for themselves and their children. Here's a comparison of the number of teaspoons of added sugar in a variety of common drinks.


    Images:
    Note these images reflect the amount of added sugar per container and have had natural sugars deducted from the totals. Natural sugars include naturally occurring glucose and fructose in fruit based drinks and lactose in milk.
    Soda / Soft Drink, 375ml can = 10 tsp
    Cordial mixed 1 :5, 200ml glass = 4 tsp
    Energy Drink - 600ml = 12 tsp, 300ml = 6 tsp
    Vitamin Water, 600ml = 5 1/2 tsp
    Sports Drink, 600ml = 11 tsp
    Iced Tea, 600ml = 7 tsp
    Fruit juice drink, 250ml = 6 tsp
    Flavoured milk, 300ml = 4 tsp, 600ml = 8 tsp
    Vegetable juice, 200l = 0 tsp
    100% juice, 250ml = 0tsp
    Note: We recommend that 100% juice be limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted by 2 pieces of fruit for the value of the fibre contained in the whole fruit.
    Our previous article identified that the target for children is 7 tsp per day. This could be used up by a low sugar Cereal at Breakfast and a cup of fruit juice drink at lunch. How much sugar do your children or grandchildren drink?
  24. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Djmohr in Sugar- start with the children   
    Sugar seems to be the talk of the town and celebrities claim to be avoiding it completely. We all know it's not great but how much is too much for us and our children. How do we help our children to be more discerning?


    A recent intake survey in the US which was published in The Journal of Public Health showed that almost everyone (96%) had given their child a sugary drink in the previous month. Categories included fruit juice drinks ( eg. 25% juice) / Carbonated sugary drinks / Sports Drinks / Flavoured Water eg. Vitamin Water / Energy Drinks / Iced Tea so it seems we’re all doing it. Some more than others with the most common choice being fruit juice drinks or carbonated soda / soft drinks.
    Parents answered questions on which drinks they believed to be healthy alternatives to water. Almost all identified 100% fruit juice and milk as healthy options ( note that even 100% juice is ideally limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted for 2 pieces of actual fruit so that fibre is consumed.)Many parents also reported that fruit juice drink, vitamin water or sports drink were also healthy options but are they right?
    The World Health Organisation has recommended that all nations reduce their intake of added sugars to 10% of calories and suggest it would be even better if we could make it down to 5%.
    To put this into perspective, if we just take the 10% goal this sets a target of:
    Men: 12 – 14 tsp added sugar per day
    Women: 10 tsp added sugar per day
    Children: 7 tsp added sugar per day.
    This still sounds like a reasonably generous limit until we look in children’s lunchboxes and find well meaning parents providing a 250ml fruit juice drink with 6tsp in that alone
    The current estimates suggest that the average American consumes 32 tsp of added sugar per day and the average Australian consumes 25 tsp. About half of this intake comes from sugary drinks. We are way off the mark. Never mind the current trend to aim to cut out sugar altogether, just getting it down to 10% is going to be a battle.
    We need to start young with our children and give them water to drink.
    When my children were young, I gave them pocket money and if we were out and they requested a sugary drink or a fast food meal – I let them choose whether to buy that with their own money or I would be happy to pay for water or a sandwich. I found this an easy option for kids to decide how important those foods were to them. Usually they went with the healthy meal option but they knew they were free to choose, so there was no deprivation involved and no tantrums.
    Stay tuned for the next entry showing clearly the number of teaspoons of sugar in various drinks so you can be on the lookout for unintended sugar.
    What strategies do you use to encourage water or milk intake amongst the children in your life?
  25. Like
    Amanda Clark got a reaction from Djmohr in Sugar- start with the children   
    Sugar seems to be the talk of the town and celebrities claim to be avoiding it completely. We all know it's not great but how much is too much for us and our children. How do we help our children to be more discerning?


    A recent intake survey in the US which was published in The Journal of Public Health showed that almost everyone (96%) had given their child a sugary drink in the previous month. Categories included fruit juice drinks ( eg. 25% juice) / Carbonated sugary drinks / Sports Drinks / Flavoured Water eg. Vitamin Water / Energy Drinks / Iced Tea so it seems we’re all doing it. Some more than others with the most common choice being fruit juice drinks or carbonated soda / soft drinks.
    Parents answered questions on which drinks they believed to be healthy alternatives to water. Almost all identified 100% fruit juice and milk as healthy options ( note that even 100% juice is ideally limited to 1 glass per day and is better substituted for 2 pieces of actual fruit so that fibre is consumed.)Many parents also reported that fruit juice drink, vitamin water or sports drink were also healthy options but are they right?
    The World Health Organisation has recommended that all nations reduce their intake of added sugars to 10% of calories and suggest it would be even better if we could make it down to 5%.
    To put this into perspective, if we just take the 10% goal this sets a target of:
    Men: 12 – 14 tsp added sugar per day
    Women: 10 tsp added sugar per day
    Children: 7 tsp added sugar per day.
    This still sounds like a reasonably generous limit until we look in children’s lunchboxes and find well meaning parents providing a 250ml fruit juice drink with 6tsp in that alone
    The current estimates suggest that the average American consumes 32 tsp of added sugar per day and the average Australian consumes 25 tsp. About half of this intake comes from sugary drinks. We are way off the mark. Never mind the current trend to aim to cut out sugar altogether, just getting it down to 10% is going to be a battle.
    We need to start young with our children and give them water to drink.
    When my children were young, I gave them pocket money and if we were out and they requested a sugary drink or a fast food meal – I let them choose whether to buy that with their own money or I would be happy to pay for water or a sandwich. I found this an easy option for kids to decide how important those foods were to them. Usually they went with the healthy meal option but they knew they were free to choose, so there was no deprivation involved and no tantrums.
    Stay tuned for the next entry showing clearly the number of teaspoons of sugar in various drinks so you can be on the lookout for unintended sugar.
    What strategies do you use to encourage water or milk intake amongst the children in your life?
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