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BigSue

Gastric Bypass Patients
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  1. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from summerseeker in Weirdest None-Scale-Victory - I'll go first   
    Torrid is a plus-size store, so their size 0 is equivalent to a large in non-plus sizing.
    It was weird for me to size out of plus-size stores. For my entire adult life, I was limited to a handful of stores that made clothes in my size, and now that I can find clothes in my size almost anywhere, the options are overwhelming and I have no idea where to shop!
  2. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Tomo in Stricture 3 weeks after gastric bypass   
    Please call your surgeon's office. Most of them have an answering service where they can direct you to someone on call after hours. You do not need to wait until your surgeon returns from maternity leave. I bet your surgeon made arrangements for someone else to see her patients while she is on maternity leave. This is urgent and another doctor can help you.
  3. Like
    BigSue reacted to NP_WIP in 2 week pre-op diet help!   
    Hi MChaney, every program is different and should follow your programs guidelines. Mine was different in which I could have some real protein but that was my program

    You can ask your team about including some turkey breast and veggies and get their approval. I would also invite you to reflect on your decision, is one day being traded for a better life. I chose this week for surgery knowing well I will skip my fav holiday, but some things are just worth it.

    Sent from my SM-G960U1 using BariatricPal mobile app

  4. Like
    BigSue reacted to catwoman7 in Stuck at 3.5 Months Post-Op   
    you may just be in a really long stall. Are you tracking your food intake? Are you following your plan to a "T"? If so, i'm guessing a stall for sure. If not, start tracking again. And like kcuster said, it might be helpful to contact your team if you're worried.
  5. Like
    BigSue reacted to kcuster83 in Stuck at 3.5 Months Post-Op   
    Hello, the biggest thing I can suggest is track your intake. 100% of the time.
    if you already do that, maybe reach out to your team and/or Dietician. You can review your diet and calorie intake with them and I am sure they would be able to give you pointers.
  6. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from David in Washington in Bariatric multivitamin   
    The BariatricPal Multivitamin ONE Vitamins are the best-priced bariatric Multivitamins I've seen. If you buy the ones with Iron, you might not have to take a separate iron supplement. They have a yearly subscription for $99.99, which is $8.33/month. You can buy them in smaller quantities (which I recommend doing to start to make sure you like them), but the more you buy, the lower the cost per Vitamin. They do have a chewable one that you can take right after surgery, but I didn't care for the taste (I took BariMelts for the first two months, but they are pricey).
    You can take normal drugstore vitamins, but you have to take a double dose, and if you do that, the BariatricPal subscription is cheaper than most of the drugstore vitamins.
    You will have to take a separate calcium citrate supplement (make sure it's Calcium citrate, not calcium carbonate). I LOVE the BariatricPal Belgian chocolate caramel and French vanilla caramel soft chews -- they taste like candy and make me look forward to taking my calcium. They are the lowest-priced calcium citrate chews I've seen (and they go on sale often), but you can get calcium citrate tablets for a lower price (about 1/3 of the price of soft chews per dose). I buy Caltrate petites and take those 1x per day (2 pills per dose) and soft chews 2x per day.
    You will also need vitamin B-12, which you can get as a sublingual tablet, injection, or nasal spray. I buy NatureMade brand sublingual tablets from Amazon. They are very inexpensive -- less than $10 for 50.
  7. Like
    BigSue reacted to kcuster83 in 30 minute drinking rule   
    I think the bigger issue here is that you have eaten chicken and chocolate.
    Practicing self control is going to go a long way with your success. In addition, now is not the time to test things. That one piece of chocolate could have sent you over the edge and made you ill for hours or even all day.
    You stomach needs time to heal, a tiny little shred of chicken could get caught on a stitch or staple and cause major problems, like infection.
    The 30 minute rule is so that you are not "full" of fluids when you try to eat and actually have room for the food. The 30 minutes after is to allow the food to stay in your system long enough for your body to absorb it's nutrients,a s the Water will push it through your system faster. Not the end of the world if your forget sometimes but it may make you sick when you start more solid foods.
    Refocus, you can do it.
  8. Thanks
    BigSue reacted to kcuster83 in First Bowel Movement… dark brown?   
    Poop is brown, why be worried? What exactly are you thinking?
    Blood? You poop would be BLACK and like tar if you had blood in it. It would be very obvious something is not normal.
  9. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Erin18 in Weight loss goals   
    Your goals are great! As nice as it is to see the numbers on the scale go down, I think the non-scale victories are the important ones. You might be interested in this very popular post where people discuss some of their non-scale victories:

  10. Hugs
    BigSue got a reaction from Malkia mzuri in Planning out your medicine schedule   
    You can ask your clinic for advice, but it's probably going to be up to you to figure out, mainly because you have to work it around your schedule. It can seem complicated at first, but you get used to it. I take a Multivitamin with Iron plus an additional iron supplement, Calcium 3x/day, B12, Biotin, and D3. Calcium and iron are supposed to be at least 2 hours apart, and I also take a prescription thyroid medication that's supposed to be 4 hours apart from calcium and iron.
    I use a free app called Medisafe to track my medications and remind me. It's really useful because you can track what time you took everything, and it also tracks how many of each you have left and reminds you to refill. You can set reminders at whatever time you want. I set reminders as follows, but I usually stay ahead of schedule.
    6:00 am - Thyroid prescription 10:30 am - Multivitamin with iron, B12, Biotin, D3 1:00 pm - 1st calcium 3:30 pm - iron 6:00 pm - 2nd calcium 8:30 pm - 3rd calcium I also recommend getting a pill organizer with 3 or 4 compartments for each day, where each day has its own removable box (the one I have looks like this one: https://smile.amazon.com/Organizer-Compartments-Moisture-Proof-Medication-Supplements/dp/B07Q9JSHMP). I distribute my pills in that once per week, and then I can just grab the box for the day.
  11. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Jrs830 in Eating carbs (pasta, rice, or bread )   
    I'm 18 months out and I still rarely eat refined carbs. I mainly eat vegetables, lean Protein (poultry, fish, pork, egg whites), and legumes. I don't eat a lot of processed low-carb substitute foods because they tend to be overpriced and often high in fat and calories, but I do have a few go-to substitutions:
    Cauliflower rice - I eat this several times per week and don't miss real rice at all. I buy the frozen stuff, so it's even faster and easier to prepare than real rice. Mr. Tortilla 1-net-carb tortillas (these are small and great for tacos). La Banderita carb counter tortillas (larger and great for wraps, and I cannot tell the difference from real flour tortillas). Mashed cauliflower - good substitute for mashed potatoes (with a lot of garlic and herbs, and low fat gravy).
  12. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Nepenthe44 in Frustration with dietitian   
    You seem to have a really cynical outlook on all of this. I, too, am a scientist by profession, and I've always been a bit of a pessimist, but I think sometimes, it's worth giving people the benefit of the doubt.
    It looks like you don't think your bariatric team has your best interests at heart. I know you've been burned before, and I also know what it's like to be constantly judged as stupid, lazy, noncompliant, untrustworthy, unworthy, etc. because of my weight, so I can understand your feelings about this, but don't forget that these are people who have devoted their careers to providing weight loss surgery. I'm not saying that they all genuinely care about alleviating the plight of the obese, or that they're sympathetic toward those of us in a position of needing this surgery, but I doubt there are very many medical professionals in the bariatric surgery field who are out to punish and criticize fat patients just for fun (or out of personal dislike of fat people). If for no other reason than their own self-interest, chances are that they want patients to succeed with weight loss surgery, and they are probably doing what they believe will contribute to their patients' success.
    Another thing to keep in mind is that sometimes people can be right for the wrong reasons. I've run into this in my own job, where someone has told me something that didn't seem to make sense, and I (as someone like you with an inquisitive mind) have gone looking for the real story, only to find that what I was told was correct, even though the reasoning was not. In this case, your dietitian might be giving you good direction even if she doesn't actually understand what she's talking about. Just because that dietitian (or even the whole bariatric team) doesn't know or understand the reasoning behind the rules, it doesn't necessarily mean that the rules are incorrect or arbitrary.
    Finally, if you hang around this forum for long enough, you will see that many patients want and need a lot of hand-holding. Some people would rather be given strict but arbitrary rules than loose guidelines. People are constantly on here posting questions like, "I had surgery X days ago; can I eat Y?" And honestly, considering that, I can't blame surgeons at all for wanting to make things as black and white as possible so they don't have to spend all their time answering these incredibly specific questions, tailored to each individual patient. Most patients are not medical researchers, and many want definitive instructions from their doctors. Many people would be paralyzed with indecision if they were told, "Some studies say X and others say Y; you figure it out."
    Ultimately, it's up to you to decide how closely to follow your surgeon's directions, and if you do your own research and believe you have found a better way, you can make that decision. But I would venture to say that you will likely have a better experience if you have a mindset of working WITH your bariatric surgery team instead of taking an adversarial approach.
  13. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Esi in Eating carbs (pasta, rice, or bread )   
    I forgot about Pasta in my previous reply… I haven’t eaten regular pasta since my surgery. Shirataki noodles are pretty good if you take the time to prepare them correctly, but it’s kind of an involved process and I’m too lazy to do it often. Zoodles (zucchini noodles) are ok; I prefer them cooked in the air fryer so they’re not so soggy. I love spaghetti squash (delicious roasted in the air fryer), but it doesn’t really taste like spaghetti.
    Radishes are a good substitute for potatoes in Soups and stews. They don’t have much flavor, but they have a similar texture.
    I don’t do Keto (super low carb) and I don’t think it’s sustainable long-term for most people, and also not necessarily good for bariatric patients because it’s a high-fat diet, but I do try to avoid sugar, white flour, rice, potatoes, etc. Most of my carbs are from low-starch vegetables and legumes.
  14. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Nepenthe44 in Frustration with dietitian   
    You seem to have a really cynical outlook on all of this. I, too, am a scientist by profession, and I've always been a bit of a pessimist, but I think sometimes, it's worth giving people the benefit of the doubt.
    It looks like you don't think your bariatric team has your best interests at heart. I know you've been burned before, and I also know what it's like to be constantly judged as stupid, lazy, noncompliant, untrustworthy, unworthy, etc. because of my weight, so I can understand your feelings about this, but don't forget that these are people who have devoted their careers to providing weight loss surgery. I'm not saying that they all genuinely care about alleviating the plight of the obese, or that they're sympathetic toward those of us in a position of needing this surgery, but I doubt there are very many medical professionals in the bariatric surgery field who are out to punish and criticize fat patients just for fun (or out of personal dislike of fat people). If for no other reason than their own self-interest, chances are that they want patients to succeed with weight loss surgery, and they are probably doing what they believe will contribute to their patients' success.
    Another thing to keep in mind is that sometimes people can be right for the wrong reasons. I've run into this in my own job, where someone has told me something that didn't seem to make sense, and I (as someone like you with an inquisitive mind) have gone looking for the real story, only to find that what I was told was correct, even though the reasoning was not. In this case, your dietitian might be giving you good direction even if she doesn't actually understand what she's talking about. Just because that dietitian (or even the whole bariatric team) doesn't know or understand the reasoning behind the rules, it doesn't necessarily mean that the rules are incorrect or arbitrary.
    Finally, if you hang around this forum for long enough, you will see that many patients want and need a lot of hand-holding. Some people would rather be given strict but arbitrary rules than loose guidelines. People are constantly on here posting questions like, "I had surgery X days ago; can I eat Y?" And honestly, considering that, I can't blame surgeons at all for wanting to make things as black and white as possible so they don't have to spend all their time answering these incredibly specific questions, tailored to each individual patient. Most patients are not medical researchers, and many want definitive instructions from their doctors. Many people would be paralyzed with indecision if they were told, "Some studies say X and others say Y; you figure it out."
    Ultimately, it's up to you to decide how closely to follow your surgeon's directions, and if you do your own research and believe you have found a better way, you can make that decision. But I would venture to say that you will likely have a better experience if you have a mindset of working WITH your bariatric surgery team instead of taking an adversarial approach.
  15. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Rebekah S in Food log?   
    I use MyFitnessPal and I just don’t use the “complete diary” function. It really isn’t necessary to close out the day.
    I’ve been using MyFitnessPal for 2.5 years, so I’m kind of attached to it, but a lot of people prefer other apps such as Baritastic, Lose It, or Cronometer, so you might want to give those a try if you don’t like MyFitnessPal.
  16. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from raspberrylime in Stomach spasms??   
    My surgeon prescribed hyoscyamine after my surgery to treat stomach spasms. I didn’t end up needing to take it (I think they just prescribe it to all patients just in case) and I remember the nurse telling me that spasms are more common for VSG patients than gastric bypass. So yes, I think it is common, and your surgeon may be able to prescribe something that can help.
  17. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from kcuster83 in Sleeve or Bypass Regrets?   
    I’m sorry to hear you have so many regrets. Thank you for sharing your story — I think it is important for people considering this surgery to see the good, the bad, and the ugly. When I was considering surgery, I actively sought people who regretted it because I wanted to be prepared for the worst-case scenario, but it’s hard to find negative information because it’s mainly people who are happy with their surgery who post on forums like this.
    I started out very heavy (BMI over 60), so it was pretty clear that I couldn’t lose the weight I needed to lose without surgery, but even then it was a difficult decision. I am often surprised that people starting with a BMI under 35 would put themselves through this surgery. I don’t say that to judge, but this surgery is rough, and to me, such a high risk/cost was only worth it for the potential of a high reward. But that cost/benefit analysis is something that every individual has to do for him or herself.
    I would like to say that I hope you get to the day you don’t regret the surgery, and I think you have a good shot at getting there. It is very common to have regrets early on, even for people who end up being very glad they got the surgery. The beginning is really hard, and it gets easier for most people after the first several months. I hope that once you lose more weight, progress to normal food, and get used to your new lifestyle, you will be happier and not regret having the surgery.
  18. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from kcuster83 in Sleeve or Bypass Regrets?   
    I’m sorry to hear you have so many regrets. Thank you for sharing your story — I think it is important for people considering this surgery to see the good, the bad, and the ugly. When I was considering surgery, I actively sought people who regretted it because I wanted to be prepared for the worst-case scenario, but it’s hard to find negative information because it’s mainly people who are happy with their surgery who post on forums like this.
    I started out very heavy (BMI over 60), so it was pretty clear that I couldn’t lose the weight I needed to lose without surgery, but even then it was a difficult decision. I am often surprised that people starting with a BMI under 35 would put themselves through this surgery. I don’t say that to judge, but this surgery is rough, and to me, such a high risk/cost was only worth it for the potential of a high reward. But that cost/benefit analysis is something that every individual has to do for him or herself.
    I would like to say that I hope you get to the day you don’t regret the surgery, and I think you have a good shot at getting there. It is very common to have regrets early on, even for people who end up being very glad they got the surgery. The beginning is really hard, and it gets easier for most people after the first several months. I hope that once you lose more weight, progress to normal food, and get used to your new lifestyle, you will be happier and not regret having the surgery.
  19. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from pretty_persian in **Weight REGAIN**   
    Welcome! First of all, great job on your weight loss. Even after the regain, you’re still down 130 pounds from where you started, which is a major accomplishment.
    Secondly, I’m appalled that your bariatric surgeon’s solution was a 10-day liquid diet, as if that’s a realistic long-term weight loss strategy. I do think you’re on the right track to go to a PCP and get your thyroid and Vitamin deficiencies corrected.
    Are you tracking your eating at all? I use MyFitnessPal, but there are other apps like Baritastic that have similar features, and I think tracking your eating can really help you see where you can improve. At least for me, there’s something about seeing the numbers that makes it clear what is or isn’t worth eating.
  20. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from summerset in how did you create a goal weight?   
    My philosophy is that you don't pick a goal weight -- your goal weight picks you. That probably sounds silly, and it's sort of an exaggeration, but when you're talking about the massive weight loss one gets from weight loss surgery, it's not necessarily practical to target a specific number on the scale. I didn't really have a "goal weight" -- nor did my surgeon -- until I went to my psychological evaluation and the psychiatrist asked me. Even that, I think, was mainly about checking to make sure I had realistic expectations. The number I gave was based on the average/typical weight loss for gastric bypass patients. I think I went with 180 pounds, but I actually ended up around 140.
    To me, the number on the scale is pretty meaningless. And I say that as someone with an analytical mind, who loves numbers and spreadsheets and graphs. The non-scale victories are far, far more important to your quality of life. First, and foremost are the health goals -- things like getting off of medications, having a healthy blood pressure and blood glucose, etc. Then there are the physical benefits like being able to walk a mile without sweating or a few flights of stairs without getting winded, and not having constant pain in your feet and knees. And of course the social benefits of literally fitting into the world -- flying without a seatbelt extension, sitting in a booth at a restaurant, not having to worry about weight limits on furniture. Finally, being more confident and satisfied with your body/appearance, having more clothing options, and being more accepted by people and society in general (which is really sad, but true).
    I think if you are fixated on a specific number on the scale, you can lose sight of those important non-scale victories. I'm not saying you shouldn't track your weight (I weigh myself probably more than I should, multiple times per day) or that the scale isn't important to your progress, but you don't know what the number will be when you hit the point that you have lost enough weight to improve your life. That's especially true when you start out at a high weight, because your body will not be the same at 220 pounds (after losing 200+ pounds) as someone who has never been higher than 220 pounds, because your body will have more skin and bigger bones even with the same amount of fat and muscle.
  21. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Nepenthe44 in Frustration with dietitian   
    You seem to have a really cynical outlook on all of this. I, too, am a scientist by profession, and I've always been a bit of a pessimist, but I think sometimes, it's worth giving people the benefit of the doubt.
    It looks like you don't think your bariatric team has your best interests at heart. I know you've been burned before, and I also know what it's like to be constantly judged as stupid, lazy, noncompliant, untrustworthy, unworthy, etc. because of my weight, so I can understand your feelings about this, but don't forget that these are people who have devoted their careers to providing weight loss surgery. I'm not saying that they all genuinely care about alleviating the plight of the obese, or that they're sympathetic toward those of us in a position of needing this surgery, but I doubt there are very many medical professionals in the bariatric surgery field who are out to punish and criticize fat patients just for fun (or out of personal dislike of fat people). If for no other reason than their own self-interest, chances are that they want patients to succeed with weight loss surgery, and they are probably doing what they believe will contribute to their patients' success.
    Another thing to keep in mind is that sometimes people can be right for the wrong reasons. I've run into this in my own job, where someone has told me something that didn't seem to make sense, and I (as someone like you with an inquisitive mind) have gone looking for the real story, only to find that what I was told was correct, even though the reasoning was not. In this case, your dietitian might be giving you good direction even if she doesn't actually understand what she's talking about. Just because that dietitian (or even the whole bariatric team) doesn't know or understand the reasoning behind the rules, it doesn't necessarily mean that the rules are incorrect or arbitrary.
    Finally, if you hang around this forum for long enough, you will see that many patients want and need a lot of hand-holding. Some people would rather be given strict but arbitrary rules than loose guidelines. People are constantly on here posting questions like, "I had surgery X days ago; can I eat Y?" And honestly, considering that, I can't blame surgeons at all for wanting to make things as black and white as possible so they don't have to spend all their time answering these incredibly specific questions, tailored to each individual patient. Most patients are not medical researchers, and many want definitive instructions from their doctors. Many people would be paralyzed with indecision if they were told, "Some studies say X and others say Y; you figure it out."
    Ultimately, it's up to you to decide how closely to follow your surgeon's directions, and if you do your own research and believe you have found a better way, you can make that decision. But I would venture to say that you will likely have a better experience if you have a mindset of working WITH your bariatric surgery team instead of taking an adversarial approach.
  22. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Nepenthe44 in Frustration with dietitian   
    You seem to have a really cynical outlook on all of this. I, too, am a scientist by profession, and I've always been a bit of a pessimist, but I think sometimes, it's worth giving people the benefit of the doubt.
    It looks like you don't think your bariatric team has your best interests at heart. I know you've been burned before, and I also know what it's like to be constantly judged as stupid, lazy, noncompliant, untrustworthy, unworthy, etc. because of my weight, so I can understand your feelings about this, but don't forget that these are people who have devoted their careers to providing weight loss surgery. I'm not saying that they all genuinely care about alleviating the plight of the obese, or that they're sympathetic toward those of us in a position of needing this surgery, but I doubt there are very many medical professionals in the bariatric surgery field who are out to punish and criticize fat patients just for fun (or out of personal dislike of fat people). If for no other reason than their own self-interest, chances are that they want patients to succeed with weight loss surgery, and they are probably doing what they believe will contribute to their patients' success.
    Another thing to keep in mind is that sometimes people can be right for the wrong reasons. I've run into this in my own job, where someone has told me something that didn't seem to make sense, and I (as someone like you with an inquisitive mind) have gone looking for the real story, only to find that what I was told was correct, even though the reasoning was not. In this case, your dietitian might be giving you good direction even if she doesn't actually understand what she's talking about. Just because that dietitian (or even the whole bariatric team) doesn't know or understand the reasoning behind the rules, it doesn't necessarily mean that the rules are incorrect or arbitrary.
    Finally, if you hang around this forum for long enough, you will see that many patients want and need a lot of hand-holding. Some people would rather be given strict but arbitrary rules than loose guidelines. People are constantly on here posting questions like, "I had surgery X days ago; can I eat Y?" And honestly, considering that, I can't blame surgeons at all for wanting to make things as black and white as possible so they don't have to spend all their time answering these incredibly specific questions, tailored to each individual patient. Most patients are not medical researchers, and many want definitive instructions from their doctors. Many people would be paralyzed with indecision if they were told, "Some studies say X and others say Y; you figure it out."
    Ultimately, it's up to you to decide how closely to follow your surgeon's directions, and if you do your own research and believe you have found a better way, you can make that decision. But I would venture to say that you will likely have a better experience if you have a mindset of working WITH your bariatric surgery team instead of taking an adversarial approach.
  23. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Nepenthe44 in Frustration with dietitian   
    You seem to have a really cynical outlook on all of this. I, too, am a scientist by profession, and I've always been a bit of a pessimist, but I think sometimes, it's worth giving people the benefit of the doubt.
    It looks like you don't think your bariatric team has your best interests at heart. I know you've been burned before, and I also know what it's like to be constantly judged as stupid, lazy, noncompliant, untrustworthy, unworthy, etc. because of my weight, so I can understand your feelings about this, but don't forget that these are people who have devoted their careers to providing weight loss surgery. I'm not saying that they all genuinely care about alleviating the plight of the obese, or that they're sympathetic toward those of us in a position of needing this surgery, but I doubt there are very many medical professionals in the bariatric surgery field who are out to punish and criticize fat patients just for fun (or out of personal dislike of fat people). If for no other reason than their own self-interest, chances are that they want patients to succeed with weight loss surgery, and they are probably doing what they believe will contribute to their patients' success.
    Another thing to keep in mind is that sometimes people can be right for the wrong reasons. I've run into this in my own job, where someone has told me something that didn't seem to make sense, and I (as someone like you with an inquisitive mind) have gone looking for the real story, only to find that what I was told was correct, even though the reasoning was not. In this case, your dietitian might be giving you good direction even if she doesn't actually understand what she's talking about. Just because that dietitian (or even the whole bariatric team) doesn't know or understand the reasoning behind the rules, it doesn't necessarily mean that the rules are incorrect or arbitrary.
    Finally, if you hang around this forum for long enough, you will see that many patients want and need a lot of hand-holding. Some people would rather be given strict but arbitrary rules than loose guidelines. People are constantly on here posting questions like, "I had surgery X days ago; can I eat Y?" And honestly, considering that, I can't blame surgeons at all for wanting to make things as black and white as possible so they don't have to spend all their time answering these incredibly specific questions, tailored to each individual patient. Most patients are not medical researchers, and many want definitive instructions from their doctors. Many people would be paralyzed with indecision if they were told, "Some studies say X and others say Y; you figure it out."
    Ultimately, it's up to you to decide how closely to follow your surgeon's directions, and if you do your own research and believe you have found a better way, you can make that decision. But I would venture to say that you will likely have a better experience if you have a mindset of working WITH your bariatric surgery team instead of taking an adversarial approach.
  24. Like
    BigSue got a reaction from Nepenthe44 in Frustration with dietitian   
    You seem to have a really cynical outlook on all of this. I, too, am a scientist by profession, and I've always been a bit of a pessimist, but I think sometimes, it's worth giving people the benefit of the doubt.
    It looks like you don't think your bariatric team has your best interests at heart. I know you've been burned before, and I also know what it's like to be constantly judged as stupid, lazy, noncompliant, untrustworthy, unworthy, etc. because of my weight, so I can understand your feelings about this, but don't forget that these are people who have devoted their careers to providing weight loss surgery. I'm not saying that they all genuinely care about alleviating the plight of the obese, or that they're sympathetic toward those of us in a position of needing this surgery, but I doubt there are very many medical professionals in the bariatric surgery field who are out to punish and criticize fat patients just for fun (or out of personal dislike of fat people). If for no other reason than their own self-interest, chances are that they want patients to succeed with weight loss surgery, and they are probably doing what they believe will contribute to their patients' success.
    Another thing to keep in mind is that sometimes people can be right for the wrong reasons. I've run into this in my own job, where someone has told me something that didn't seem to make sense, and I (as someone like you with an inquisitive mind) have gone looking for the real story, only to find that what I was told was correct, even though the reasoning was not. In this case, your dietitian might be giving you good direction even if she doesn't actually understand what she's talking about. Just because that dietitian (or even the whole bariatric team) doesn't know or understand the reasoning behind the rules, it doesn't necessarily mean that the rules are incorrect or arbitrary.
    Finally, if you hang around this forum for long enough, you will see that many patients want and need a lot of hand-holding. Some people would rather be given strict but arbitrary rules than loose guidelines. People are constantly on here posting questions like, "I had surgery X days ago; can I eat Y?" And honestly, considering that, I can't blame surgeons at all for wanting to make things as black and white as possible so they don't have to spend all their time answering these incredibly specific questions, tailored to each individual patient. Most patients are not medical researchers, and many want definitive instructions from their doctors. Many people would be paralyzed with indecision if they were told, "Some studies say X and others say Y; you figure it out."
    Ultimately, it's up to you to decide how closely to follow your surgeon's directions, and if you do your own research and believe you have found a better way, you can make that decision. But I would venture to say that you will likely have a better experience if you have a mindset of working WITH your bariatric surgery team instead of taking an adversarial approach.
  25. Like
    BigSue reacted to SpartanMaker in Frustration with dietitian   
    The reality is, the science is far from settled on almost everything regarding diet, especially when it comes to bariatric surgery patients.
    I'm going to suggest the one thing no one has yet: Be compliant.
    Unless they were proposing something that was literally harmful (it doesn't sound like they are), it won't hurt you to let go of your biases and trust the process. The vast majority of the dietary changes proposed by these bariatric teams is based on their real-world experience with what works and what does not for the the average patient.
    Sure, some of what they are proposing may seem odd or wrong to you, but does it really matter? You won't die from it, and might even benefit. As a scientist, open your mind to trying something new and testing out what they have proposed.

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