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Creekimp13

Gastric Sleeve Patients
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  1. Like
    Creekimp13 reacted to catwoman7 in Periods and bleeding   
    it's very common. The reason oft stated is that estrogen is stored in fat cells, and a bunch of it is released during rapid weight loss. A lot of women post about mood swings and screwed-up cycles the first few weeks or months after surgery. It does eventually settle down and stabilize again.
  2. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Beth1022 in 3 week liquid diet!!   
    I had to do two weeks of liquid diet. On day 3 I was so hungry I could have gnawed my leg off. Miserable, horrible, awful experience.
    That said...it does shrink your liver, which makes your surgery safer (more room for your surgeon to work)
    This, too, shall pass.
    But I feel your pain.
    Stick with it.
    A day at a time.
  3. Like
    Creekimp13 reacted to It's time. in colonoscopy   
    I'm scheduled for a colonoscopy and since my previous one was " fair" they want me to the high volume two day prep. This is after my sleeve surgery and I can't see how I can drink 180 oz, in 24 hours. I normally have 64 oz in a day. My stomach just isn't that big anymore. I have a call into my doctor. What have others done for the two day prep, post surgery?
  4. Like
    Creekimp13 reacted to catwoman7 in colonoscopy   
    I scheduled my last colonoscopy appointment in the afternoon so I could break up the Golytely (or whatever it is) - I drank half of it in the evening and the other half the following morning (per instructions).
    I had a morning appt the first time I went through this so I had to drink the whole gallon in one evening. Not doing that again...
    In both cases, though, I had to drink a bottle of magnesium citrate the night before I started the golytely, and the mag citrate is only like 16 oz - so I did have two days of prep, but it sounds like it might be different from yours.

    (in other words, I did day 1 - bottle of magnesium citrate. Day 2 - half gallon of Golytely in the evening. Day 3 (day of colonoscopy) - the other half gallon of Golytely that morning, colonoscopy in the afternoon
  5. Like
    Creekimp13 reacted to SunnyinSC in Today's Rant: Why not what   
    I agree! The whys are definitely important. I had to put surgery on hold for 3 months while I saw a therapist and I'm actually really glad I did. We ended up doing a couples session and identified at least one sort of "trigger" for me that I didn't really think about before. For me, I've realized that "mental load" can often wind up feeling really overwhelming if one thing sort of gets knocked out of place. I'll list up all these tasks in my head of things I need to do, and then if say.. I suddenly have to work overtime, I'll panic and stress eat as a result. And sure I'll tell myself that it's only this once, and I deserve it I'm working extra so I don't have time to cook and blah blah, but if those things were true then I wouldn't have ended up as overweight as I am. The truth is it wasn't "once".
    The solution we've found that works for our household is me just keeping the "list" written on the fridge instead of in my mind. This means my husband can see what needs to be done without me having to ask, because I hate hate hate asking (it makes me feel like a mother instead of a partner). If he knows what needs to be done, then he'll do it, especially if he sees I'm stressed. That has helped ward off a lot of the overwhelmed feelings that led me to eat before.
    I also came to a rude awakening post-surgery regarding not finishing food. We were a "clean your plate" household, and while I'm aware of it, I didn't realize just quite how much throwing away food I was enjoying would bug me. If there's enough for leftovers, then I'll store it, but sometime I literally have a bite or two left. It's gotten easier to discard the little bits as time has gone on, but the first time I had just a couple bites left I sat there staring at my food for a good 20 minutes or so, hoping the full feeling would magically disappear before I finally tossed it out.
    I am still continuing to see a therapist, and will be doing so until I've got a comfortable hold on my various "whys" and how to address them. While I am definitely better off than I was several months ago, I still have a lot of room for improvement. Eventually I hope to get to a place where I'm comfortable just calling the therapist when I'm having a particularly bad time, but I'm not quite there yet.
  6. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from bufbills in I almost gave in to the arches….   
    I eat fast food all the time. But I make better choices. At McD's I'll eat an egg mcmuffin and a coffee with cream and splenda. At Wendy's, I love their grilled chicken strawberry salad and eat about 2/3 of it. At KFC, I've been known to eat two chicken legs, original, no sides...and an ice tea. At Burger King, I'll eat half an Impossible Whopper.
    For some people....stopping at fast food is too triggering and leads to free for all binging melt downs.
    For me, I've found that I need to face my triggers to feel in control of my eating habits.
    I purposefully go to fast food places for lunches (not always, but regularly when working) and order sensibly. I know exactly the number of calories I'm eating and make sure the rest of my day fits. I read the nutrition information before I order, make a plan, and stick to it.
    Fast food places don't bother me anymore. I don't feel threatened with feeling out of control anymore. I feel like I can eat there and still eat responsibly.
    I like fast food. In moderation. With my eyes wide open.
    I like feeling like I've slayed that dragon and it holds no control over me anymore.
  7. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Candace76 in Today's Rant: Why not what   
    I think it's important to talk about what we're eating. We do a lot of that. In minutia. We lable foods good and evil. We obsess about the "right" diet, calories, choices, etc....
    But that's really the easy part.
    The hard part is figuring out WHY we're eating. WHY we ate ourselves to morbid obesity, and what need we were trying to address when we put that food in our bodies.
    I feel like if those needs aren't figured out and meaningfully delt with this whole process is really vulnerable to failure.
    I feel like we never talk about why we ate so much.
    I'm not saying we need pity party hour with extensive confessionals chronicallying every challenge, insecurity and poopy life event...lol.
    But I feel like sharing those little eureka moments were we've identified some little unmet need that resulted in bad choices....would be a good thing.
    For instance.... I used to get the KFC six million calorie dinner with the 12 pieces of chicken, 3 sides, biscuits and the chocolate chip cake....after grocery shopping. It was almost an unwritten thing. I deserved it. In some weird justification, I figured that I was shopping, carrying stuff in, putting things away, selflessly giving up time to a task I sort of despised for my family. Of course I deserved chicken!
    But really, what I wanted at the core of things....was support. I wanted to feel appreciated, and rewarded for being a good doobie. I wanted to feel nurtured after a stressful task that I hated.
    These days....we have a new rule at the house. The person who does the grocery shopping gets to relax and take a bath while the other person does the cooking. And you know what? It works. I feel appreciated, supported. And I eat a more balanced decent dinner and have a win. That feels good. I learned that I geninely don't like asking for help...and that I need to more often. Just writing that makes me cringe.
    My bariatric therapist did a lot of talking about the "whys" of over eating, and finding ways to get the desired needs met that aren't self sabotaging.
    I wish we talked about the "whys" more.

  8. Haha
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Candace76 in Rant: The Word I Hate   
    I hate "weightloss journey" too. I don't mind if anyone says it....it's my personal hang up, too. It's just so cheesily coined from My 600 Pound Life or something. My eye twitches over it. It's really not a bad term or anything...it just feels overused and cliche and makes me grit my teeth a little.
    I picture two dogs and a cat on a log with a bear or something.
    I have issues. LOL.
  9. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Candace76 in Today's Rant: Why not what   
    I think it's important to talk about what we're eating. We do a lot of that. In minutia. We lable foods good and evil. We obsess about the "right" diet, calories, choices, etc....
    But that's really the easy part.
    The hard part is figuring out WHY we're eating. WHY we ate ourselves to morbid obesity, and what need we were trying to address when we put that food in our bodies.
    I feel like if those needs aren't figured out and meaningfully delt with this whole process is really vulnerable to failure.
    I feel like we never talk about why we ate so much.
    I'm not saying we need pity party hour with extensive confessionals chronicallying every challenge, insecurity and poopy life event...lol.
    But I feel like sharing those little eureka moments were we've identified some little unmet need that resulted in bad choices....would be a good thing.
    For instance.... I used to get the KFC six million calorie dinner with the 12 pieces of chicken, 3 sides, biscuits and the chocolate chip cake....after grocery shopping. It was almost an unwritten thing. I deserved it. In some weird justification, I figured that I was shopping, carrying stuff in, putting things away, selflessly giving up time to a task I sort of despised for my family. Of course I deserved chicken!
    But really, what I wanted at the core of things....was support. I wanted to feel appreciated, and rewarded for being a good doobie. I wanted to feel nurtured after a stressful task that I hated.
    These days....we have a new rule at the house. The person who does the grocery shopping gets to relax and take a bath while the other person does the cooking. And you know what? It works. I feel appreciated, supported. And I eat a more balanced decent dinner and have a win. That feels good. I learned that I geninely don't like asking for help...and that I need to more often. Just writing that makes me cringe.
    My bariatric therapist did a lot of talking about the "whys" of over eating, and finding ways to get the desired needs met that aren't self sabotaging.
    I wish we talked about the "whys" more.

  10. Like
    Creekimp13 reacted to catwoman7 in Rant: The Word I Hate   
    "moist" is a commonly hated word. In fact, there's a Facebook group for haters of that word.
  11. Like
    Creekimp13 reacted to Candace76 in Today's Rant: Why not what   
    I think it is great that you came up with an alternative "reward"/routine for completing food shopping. I can relate to using food to reward or treat myself for completing a task. I used to start my work week with what I called "McGriddle Mondays" (surprised McD hasn't used that yet😉) to get ready to face the week ahead. For me, I also think some of my overeating has been due to periods of restriction/dieting and then needing to have a break from the restrictions (yo-yoing). Some of it is habit, such as 3:00 chocolate fixes, and having to end the day with a dessert. There may still be more "whys" for me other than rewards, rebelling restrictions & habits, so thank you for bringing this up, as I think you are right. We need to be aware of our why or triggers, because those can manifest in the future if we are unaware or don't find ways to manage or resolve them.
  12. Like
    Creekimp13 reacted to catwoman7 in Today's Rant: Why not what   
    this sounds really weird, but I always strove to be a super healthy eater, so I'd eat all this food to make sure I got all of my nutrients for the day. For example, my usual Breakfast pre-surgery was a smoothie. I would throw in a bunch (and I mean a BUNCH) of soft tofu or Greek yogurt, a banana, two or three peaches or an equal amount of melon or cantaloupe, several berries, some nonfat dry milk, and then enough orange juice to get it going in the blender. So that was like 600 kcal before I even walked out the door. Mid-morning I'd usually head downstairs to the coffee shop (I worked in a library) to get a coffee and an oat scone. Oats are good for you. So there's another 500 (or more) calories. Lunches were always leftovers. I can't remember if I usually had afternoon Snacks or not (it's been six years since surgery), but if I did, it probably would have been a packet (or two) of cashews from the vending machine. Nuts have lots of nutrients, you know. Then I'd come home and snack while I was making dinner. Dinners were often some sort of ethnic fare - Chinese or Thai or Indian - so chicken (usually) plus heaps of vegetables in some creamy sauce (that is, if Thai or Indian) served over about a cup of brown rice. So yea - healthy - at least nutrient-wise - but probably 3000 or so calories a day, give or take.
    I still worry about not getting all my nutrients every day. Like - always. But then I remember that I DO take Vitamins, so I'm getting some that way - and over the course of several days, I probably DO get all my nutrients - just not all in one day. But I still find myself thinking about this - and thinking that I should go eat some nuts or something because they're nutritious.
  13. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from GreenTealael in Not so pleasant experience at work   
    Fat is the last safe prejudice...people are stupid casual about insensitive fat remarks. And yep, as thinner people now...we get an earful of that from people who would have filtered around us when we were heavier. It's messed up and sad. I've heard some awful remarks about fat people from people I would have otherwise said were typically very kind. It's shocking and disheartening.
    The problem with how unkindly this was said...is that it's probably a truthful observation clinically. Cross over or transfer addiction is very real.
    Most bariatric clinics don't meaningfully address this component of obesity. They don't provide enough support to address the core issues of how folks ended up obese to begin with. They want to cure the symptom (the obese body) without understanding the whole illness.
    In my opinion, that's a huge mistake.
  14. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Candace76 in Today's Rant: Why not what   
    I think it's important to talk about what we're eating. We do a lot of that. In minutia. We lable foods good and evil. We obsess about the "right" diet, calories, choices, etc....
    But that's really the easy part.
    The hard part is figuring out WHY we're eating. WHY we ate ourselves to morbid obesity, and what need we were trying to address when we put that food in our bodies.
    I feel like if those needs aren't figured out and meaningfully delt with this whole process is really vulnerable to failure.
    I feel like we never talk about why we ate so much.
    I'm not saying we need pity party hour with extensive confessionals chronicallying every challenge, insecurity and poopy life event...lol.
    But I feel like sharing those little eureka moments were we've identified some little unmet need that resulted in bad choices....would be a good thing.
    For instance.... I used to get the KFC six million calorie dinner with the 12 pieces of chicken, 3 sides, biscuits and the chocolate chip cake....after grocery shopping. It was almost an unwritten thing. I deserved it. In some weird justification, I figured that I was shopping, carrying stuff in, putting things away, selflessly giving up time to a task I sort of despised for my family. Of course I deserved chicken!
    But really, what I wanted at the core of things....was support. I wanted to feel appreciated, and rewarded for being a good doobie. I wanted to feel nurtured after a stressful task that I hated.
    These days....we have a new rule at the house. The person who does the grocery shopping gets to relax and take a bath while the other person does the cooking. And you know what? It works. I feel appreciated, supported. And I eat a more balanced decent dinner and have a win. That feels good. I learned that I geninely don't like asking for help...and that I need to more often. Just writing that makes me cringe.
    My bariatric therapist did a lot of talking about the "whys" of over eating, and finding ways to get the desired needs met that aren't self sabotaging.
    I wish we talked about the "whys" more.

  15. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Beth1022 in Need some statistics   
    If you meet your protien goal, you will protect your heart. If you go to your appointments, do your tests, do your best to follow instructions, and take your Vitamins as directed.... you will likely be a lot healthier than you've been in years.
    There is nothing more strongly linked with early death, cancer, stroke, heart disease and diabetes.....than significant obesity.
    Also...some doctors don't do a "starvation diet" (which I personally agree could be metabolically terrible and probably unwise). My doctor wanted us eating 1200 calories per day as soon as possible. I did at three weeks. (6 little 200 calorie meals)
    I think where most of the people who have issues run into problems...is when they don't follow up. They have an unexpected gain or feel unhappy with results and don't continue to get their labs checked or do their follow up appointments. Yes, a few problems can arise as a result of these surgeries....most are very treatable.
    Always weigh benefits vs risk. And also consider the risk involved in doing nothing.

  16. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Candace76 in Rant: The Word I Hate   
    I refer to my new stomach as my banana. Sleeve sounds too much like foreskin or something. Pouch just makes the bypass people sound like kangaroos. Kangaroos are cute.

  17. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Beth1022 in Need some statistics   
    If you meet your protien goal, you will protect your heart. If you go to your appointments, do your tests, do your best to follow instructions, and take your Vitamins as directed.... you will likely be a lot healthier than you've been in years.
    There is nothing more strongly linked with early death, cancer, stroke, heart disease and diabetes.....than significant obesity.
    Also...some doctors don't do a "starvation diet" (which I personally agree could be metabolically terrible and probably unwise). My doctor wanted us eating 1200 calories per day as soon as possible. I did at three weeks. (6 little 200 calorie meals)
    I think where most of the people who have issues run into problems...is when they don't follow up. They have an unexpected gain or feel unhappy with results and don't continue to get their labs checked or do their follow up appointments. Yes, a few problems can arise as a result of these surgeries....most are very treatable.
    Always weigh benefits vs risk. And also consider the risk involved in doing nothing.

  18. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Candace76 in Today's Rant: Why not what   
    I think it's important to talk about what we're eating. We do a lot of that. In minutia. We lable foods good and evil. We obsess about the "right" diet, calories, choices, etc....
    But that's really the easy part.
    The hard part is figuring out WHY we're eating. WHY we ate ourselves to morbid obesity, and what need we were trying to address when we put that food in our bodies.
    I feel like if those needs aren't figured out and meaningfully delt with this whole process is really vulnerable to failure.
    I feel like we never talk about why we ate so much.
    I'm not saying we need pity party hour with extensive confessionals chronicallying every challenge, insecurity and poopy life event...lol.
    But I feel like sharing those little eureka moments were we've identified some little unmet need that resulted in bad choices....would be a good thing.
    For instance.... I used to get the KFC six million calorie dinner with the 12 pieces of chicken, 3 sides, biscuits and the chocolate chip cake....after grocery shopping. It was almost an unwritten thing. I deserved it. In some weird justification, I figured that I was shopping, carrying stuff in, putting things away, selflessly giving up time to a task I sort of despised for my family. Of course I deserved chicken!
    But really, what I wanted at the core of things....was support. I wanted to feel appreciated, and rewarded for being a good doobie. I wanted to feel nurtured after a stressful task that I hated.
    These days....we have a new rule at the house. The person who does the grocery shopping gets to relax and take a bath while the other person does the cooking. And you know what? It works. I feel appreciated, supported. And I eat a more balanced decent dinner and have a win. That feels good. I learned that I geninely don't like asking for help...and that I need to more often. Just writing that makes me cringe.
    My bariatric therapist did a lot of talking about the "whys" of over eating, and finding ways to get the desired needs met that aren't self sabotaging.
    I wish we talked about the "whys" more.

  19. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from GreenTealael in Not so pleasant experience at work   
    Fat is the last safe prejudice...people are stupid casual about insensitive fat remarks. And yep, as thinner people now...we get an earful of that from people who would have filtered around us when we were heavier. It's messed up and sad. I've heard some awful remarks about fat people from people I would have otherwise said were typically very kind. It's shocking and disheartening.
    The problem with how unkindly this was said...is that it's probably a truthful observation clinically. Cross over or transfer addiction is very real.
    Most bariatric clinics don't meaningfully address this component of obesity. They don't provide enough support to address the core issues of how folks ended up obese to begin with. They want to cure the symptom (the obese body) without understanding the whole illness.
    In my opinion, that's a huge mistake.
  20. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Arabesque in I almost gave in to the arches….   
    I think one of the reasons I really felt I had to take control of fast food....were the conversations I had with my therapist about how I used fast food in the past. It was a huge reward/comfort/coping mechanism (read binge trigger...disordered eating symptom).
    If I was having a challenging morning, I'd promise myself to make it easier with a Mc Big Breakfast on the way to whatever difficult day awaited me. 766 calories of what felt like self nurturing, but was really self sabotage.....particularly when paired with the rest of the day's stress eating.
    If I had that day when I had a million errands and the dreaded task of buying groceries.....I rewarded myself, justifying that after carrying in groceries and putting everything away, woe is me Cinderella....I DESERVED to have the monster bucket of KFC with all the sides for dinner....because it was self nurturing to let someone else make dinner. (self nurturing turned into 850 calories of chicken meal, plus ice cream...oye)
    Anytime I had to do something unpleasant...I'd build in the silver lining. A doctor's appointment isn't so bad if you get fries and a fancy coffee afterward. Even after seeing the veterinarian, I had to stop to get the dog a plain burger as a reward for being good....and of course, something for me for undertaking such a task.
    You can justify fast food with hospitality and generosity. Oh, I knew Suzy hadn't eaten, so I stopped for her. If you're being considerate to others it's a perfect excuse to reward (sabotage) yourself. Hey, I'm being a good doobie, good for me, I deserve fries, too.
    Sometimes the fast food was an enhancement to happy times. How many times have I celebrated a little good news with fast food or a donut? Take the kids to the zoo, everyone's tired, let's get a burger and make it an extra fun afternoon. And of course you get fast food nonstop while traveling or on vacation to bring a little of home with you. Oye.
    Fast food was a huge emotional reward. It represented medicating stress, it represented enhancing pleasure. It represented nurturing that I needed and wasn't getting.
    And it represented a metric feck ton of over budget calories and addiction behavior.
    So yeah...fast food is complicated. There's a reason we crave it and it's not all about it tasting good. Sometimes after surgery we feel tired and overwhelmed and want that comfort habit, that celebration, that medication for stress. And that is NOT the way to eat any food if you want to break the cycle of disordered eating.
    Promise yourself other ways of nurturing yourself. Try to avoid food rewards/coping....but at the very least, if you do a food reward...make sure the calories and nutrition can be balanced. Make part of nurturing giving yourself a nutritional win.
    Also...if you nurture yourself with food, learn to ask for help with nurturing instead. At my house...whoever does the grocery shopping now is exempt from cooking that night. Someone else has to cook...which makes the grocery buyer feel appreciated and cared for....and keeps her from bringing home junkfood. Do other stuff that makes you feel good. Have yourself a deep bath, order a good movie or book, schedule a massage....do something nice for yourself that gives you a similar warm fuzzy feeling without the colossal calories.
    At the end of the day.....fast food isn't the problem. It can be consumed sensibly if we're ready and understand why it's dangerous. Lots of places are offering some healthier options.
    The real problem is unmet need, stress that needs soothing, celebratory traditions that are ingrained but unhealthy.
    I did a lot of talking about fast food and modifying fast food traditions with my therapist. It genuinely helped.

  21. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from Arabesque in I almost gave in to the arches….   
    I think one of the reasons I really felt I had to take control of fast food....were the conversations I had with my therapist about how I used fast food in the past. It was a huge reward/comfort/coping mechanism (read binge trigger...disordered eating symptom).
    If I was having a challenging morning, I'd promise myself to make it easier with a Mc Big Breakfast on the way to whatever difficult day awaited me. 766 calories of what felt like self nurturing, but was really self sabotage.....particularly when paired with the rest of the day's stress eating.
    If I had that day when I had a million errands and the dreaded task of buying groceries.....I rewarded myself, justifying that after carrying in groceries and putting everything away, woe is me Cinderella....I DESERVED to have the monster bucket of KFC with all the sides for dinner....because it was self nurturing to let someone else make dinner. (self nurturing turned into 850 calories of chicken meal, plus ice cream...oye)
    Anytime I had to do something unpleasant...I'd build in the silver lining. A doctor's appointment isn't so bad if you get fries and a fancy coffee afterward. Even after seeing the veterinarian, I had to stop to get the dog a plain burger as a reward for being good....and of course, something for me for undertaking such a task.
    You can justify fast food with hospitality and generosity. Oh, I knew Suzy hadn't eaten, so I stopped for her. If you're being considerate to others it's a perfect excuse to reward (sabotage) yourself. Hey, I'm being a good doobie, good for me, I deserve fries, too.
    Sometimes the fast food was an enhancement to happy times. How many times have I celebrated a little good news with fast food or a donut? Take the kids to the zoo, everyone's tired, let's get a burger and make it an extra fun afternoon. And of course you get fast food nonstop while traveling or on vacation to bring a little of home with you. Oye.
    Fast food was a huge emotional reward. It represented medicating stress, it represented enhancing pleasure. It represented nurturing that I needed and wasn't getting.
    And it represented a metric feck ton of over budget calories and addiction behavior.
    So yeah...fast food is complicated. There's a reason we crave it and it's not all about it tasting good. Sometimes after surgery we feel tired and overwhelmed and want that comfort habit, that celebration, that medication for stress. And that is NOT the way to eat any food if you want to break the cycle of disordered eating.
    Promise yourself other ways of nurturing yourself. Try to avoid food rewards/coping....but at the very least, if you do a food reward...make sure the calories and nutrition can be balanced. Make part of nurturing giving yourself a nutritional win.
    Also...if you nurture yourself with food, learn to ask for help with nurturing instead. At my house...whoever does the grocery shopping now is exempt from cooking that night. Someone else has to cook...which makes the grocery buyer feel appreciated and cared for....and keeps her from bringing home junkfood. Do other stuff that makes you feel good. Have yourself a deep bath, order a good movie or book, schedule a massage....do something nice for yourself that gives you a similar warm fuzzy feeling without the colossal calories.
    At the end of the day.....fast food isn't the problem. It can be consumed sensibly if we're ready and understand why it's dangerous. Lots of places are offering some healthier options.
    The real problem is unmet need, stress that needs soothing, celebratory traditions that are ingrained but unhealthy.
    I did a lot of talking about fast food and modifying fast food traditions with my therapist. It genuinely helped.

  22. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from bufbills in I almost gave in to the arches….   
    I eat fast food all the time. But I make better choices. At McD's I'll eat an egg mcmuffin and a coffee with cream and splenda. At Wendy's, I love their grilled chicken strawberry salad and eat about 2/3 of it. At KFC, I've been known to eat two chicken legs, original, no sides...and an ice tea. At Burger King, I'll eat half an Impossible Whopper.
    For some people....stopping at fast food is too triggering and leads to free for all binging melt downs.
    For me, I've found that I need to face my triggers to feel in control of my eating habits.
    I purposefully go to fast food places for lunches (not always, but regularly when working) and order sensibly. I know exactly the number of calories I'm eating and make sure the rest of my day fits. I read the nutrition information before I order, make a plan, and stick to it.
    Fast food places don't bother me anymore. I don't feel threatened with feeling out of control anymore. I feel like I can eat there and still eat responsibly.
    I like fast food. In moderation. With my eyes wide open.
    I like feeling like I've slayed that dragon and it holds no control over me anymore.
  23. Like
    Creekimp13 got a reaction from bufbills in I almost gave in to the arches….   
    I eat fast food all the time. But I make better choices. At McD's I'll eat an egg mcmuffin and a coffee with cream and splenda. At Wendy's, I love their grilled chicken strawberry salad and eat about 2/3 of it. At KFC, I've been known to eat two chicken legs, original, no sides...and an ice tea. At Burger King, I'll eat half an Impossible Whopper.
    For some people....stopping at fast food is too triggering and leads to free for all binging melt downs.
    For me, I've found that I need to face my triggers to feel in control of my eating habits.
    I purposefully go to fast food places for lunches (not always, but regularly when working) and order sensibly. I know exactly the number of calories I'm eating and make sure the rest of my day fits. I read the nutrition information before I order, make a plan, and stick to it.
    Fast food places don't bother me anymore. I don't feel threatened with feeling out of control anymore. I feel like I can eat there and still eat responsibly.
    I like fast food. In moderation. With my eyes wide open.
    I like feeling like I've slayed that dragon and it holds no control over me anymore.
  24. Like
    Creekimp13 reacted to Arabesque in Esophageal/stomach spasms post op   
    Always contact your medical team if you’re experiencing pain or unusual symptoms. You’ve had a pretty major surgery.
    It could be something as simple as healing symptoms (I was getting uncomfortable spasms & twinges as I was healing from my gall surgery). It could be that your drinking a little too quickly. But definitely give your team a call to be sure.
  25. Like
    Creekimp13 reacted to Jaelzion in Esophageal/stomach spasms post op   
    Yep, I had these. Mostly after taking a sip of liquid, but sometimes just because. It's not uncommon, I've heard people refer to it as a "cramp" (that's what I called it), a "pinch", or a spasm. For me it had completely passed by week 3. Definitely ask your surgeon about it though, there's no way we can know whether what you experiencing is due to the same cause. Always best to be safe.

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