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  2. Bariatric Surgery Nutrition

    Little known facts about losing weight after bariatric surgery

    You get shorter! No, your bones aren’t getting shorter! When losing weight, the fat pads on the soles of your feet become smaller. This tiny loss of fat in the soles of your feet leads people to think that someone in the bariatric surgery clinic isn’t measuring their height correctly, but alas, your true height is now really the shorter one! Your shoe size may decrease. With the drastic weight loss seen after bariatric surgery (typically a loss of 20-30% of your starting body weight), it won’t only be your pants that are decreasing in size, but your shoes as well! Over the years, with weight gain, your shoe size most likely gradually increased because of the additional fat in the soles of your feet and in your ankles. The reverse happens with significant weight loss. Consider this change in shoe size as returning to your natural fit. Your dentures may have to be resized. Significant weight loss not only changes your body, but it also changes your face (which you likely have noticed when renewing your driver’s license!). The weight loss in your face may change the fit of dentures or partials, which can make chewing your food down to a pulp difficult to do. If this hasn’t happened to you yet (and you’re still in the first few months after surgery), or if you’re waiting for surgery, you should anticipate a trip to your dentist to get this monitored. If you’ve been having gum pain or difficulty chewing your food since surgery, poor fitting dentures or partials may be the cause. Your glasses fit differently. This goes along with the dentures not fitting well. At your highest weight, you may have picked a frame that fit a certain way, but with your recent drastic weight loss it’s very likely you’re finding that your glasses don’t sit well anymore. They may also feel uncomfortable, or perhaps they don’t frame your face as well anymore. The reason for this goes right along with dentures fitting differently; changes in the shape of your face may leave you with glasses that just don’t fit as well as they used to. Your rings need to be resized. Another consequence of losing a large amount of body weight, is that your fingers lose a tiny amount of weight too! It’s a strong possibility that your rings will no longer fit as you approach the 6-12 month mark because your fingers become thinner. Depending on how loose your rings feel, you may need to get them resized. It’s easy to predict that your pant and dress sizes will drop as you lose weight, meaning extra $$$ being spent on a new wardrobe. What you might not have known before reading this post, is to expect changes in the fit of your shoes, dentures, glasses, and rings. Don’t forget to account for these possible extra expenses when planning for bariatric surgery. – Lisa and Monica, your bariatric surgery dietitians P.S. If you’re planning for a surgery in the coming months, check out our Complete Guide to Weight Loss Surgery book on Amazon (Amazon.ca or Amazon.com). Or, if you’re interested in more tailored support, take a peak at our one to one services here.
  3. While most people trying to lose weight have yo-yo’ed over the years, it’s a lot less common to be losing large amounts of weight (like with bariatric surgery) quickly enough to notice changes other than the obvious one at the waistline. Have you noticed any of the following? You get shorter! No, your bones aren’t getting shorter! When losing weight, the fat pads on the soles of your feet become smaller. This tiny loss of fat in the soles of your feet leads people to think that someone in the bariatric surgery clinic isn’t measuring their height correctly, but alas, your true height is now really the shorter one! Your shoe size may decrease. With the drastic weight loss seen after bariatric surgery (typically a loss of 20-30% of your starting body weight), it won’t only be your pants that are decreasing in size, but your shoes as well! Over the years, with weight gain, your shoe size most likely gradually increased because of the additional fat in the soles of your feet and in your ankles. The reverse happens with significant weight loss. Consider this change in shoe size as returning to your natural fit. Your dentures may have to be resized. Significant weight loss not only changes your body, but it also changes your face (which you likely have noticed when renewing your driver’s license!). The weight loss in your face may change the fit of dentures or partials, which can make chewing your food down to a pulp difficult to do. If this hasn’t happened to you yet (and you’re still in the first few months after surgery), or if you’re waiting for surgery, you should anticipate a trip to your dentist to get this monitored. If you’ve been having gum pain or difficulty chewing your food since surgery, poor fitting dentures or partials may be the cause. Your glasses fit differently. This goes along with the dentures not fitting well. At your highest weight, you may have picked a frame that fit a certain way, but with your recent drastic weight loss it’s very likely you’re finding that your glasses don’t sit well anymore. They may also feel uncomfortable, or perhaps they don’t frame your face as well anymore. The reason for this goes right along with dentures fitting differently; changes in the shape of your face may leave you with glasses that just don’t fit as well as they used to. Your rings need to be resized. Another consequence of losing a large amount of body weight, is that your fingers lose a tiny amount of weight too! It’s a strong possibility that your rings will no longer fit as you approach the 6-12 month mark because your fingers become thinner. Depending on how loose your rings feel, you may need to get them resized. It’s easy to predict that your pant and dress sizes will drop as you lose weight, meaning extra $$$ being spent on a new wardrobe. What you might not have known before reading this post, is to expect changes in the fit of your shoes, dentures, glasses, and rings. Don’t forget to account for these possible extra expenses when planning for bariatric surgery. – Lisa and Monica, your bariatric surgery dietitians P.S. If you’re planning for a surgery in the coming months, check out our Complete Guide to Weight Loss Surgery book on Amazon (Amazon.ca or Amazon.com). Or, if you’re interested in more tailored support, take a peak at our one to one services here.
  4. Colchabay

    February 2019 weight loss buds

    I'm spoiled by my mom. Beef, chicken, and pork Bulgogi ready for the grill or stove top. Oh if only you could smell this stuff!! Can't wait. Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using BariatricPal mobile app
  5. Rozay

    GAS After surgery

    I haven’t had my surgery yet but I’ve read a lot about this including vloggers experiences on YouTube. Walking & having someone burp you like a baby seems to be the best remedies.
  6. Hi, i got gastric bypass on the 16th of April. I was sent home today April 21st. My gas pains have been horrible, including in the hospital. The pains were so sever my heart rate was going up to 140. Besides beano does anybody know of anything I can do to get rid of the gas pains?
  7. Those sound delicious. Especially adding the pearl onions! I do love brocolli and cauliflower! Hope you’re doing well!
  8. Today
  9. I used these a few times the first few months after surgery. They work pretty good for breaking down and passing something tough to digest.
  10. GradyCat

    Hi everyone!!

    Happy Easter, Cindy! Congrats on your surgery and good luck on your weight loss journey.
  11. Frustr8

    MAY 2019 Sleevers

    And now it will always be a special. day for Coleslaw as well as YOU!
  12. Frustr8

    Nearly One Year Out...LOVING LIFE!

    You are inspiring me to not give up just yet. P4onanly won't get down to a 2, bone structure wouldn't allow it, but it l9oks very good on you.vL3ts see what Frustr8 can do, Okay?
  13. Frustr8

    Nearly One Year Out...LOVING LIFE!

    I'm now at a 2X down from 4 & 5X
  14. I’m off 6 weeks per my surgeon, I may ask for a few more additional weeks, has been a hard transition.
  15. Screwballski

    Nearly One Year Out...LOVING LIFE!

    The photo on the left is me at about 209lbs. Both photos on right were taken in March ‘19 at approx 121. I went from 2XL to size 2 in under 1 year. Again, if I can do it, you cam, too! ❤️😁
  16. NYC_PAULA

    February 2019 weight loss buds

    I feel exactly the same way. I dread the scale and weighing daily wasn't good for me because weight can fluctuate especially for women so it would drive me crazy. I do need to do once a week though. On the positive side, it helps motivate me when I see the number is down from the previous week. Looking towards the future when weight loss will slow and I'll eventually enter maintenance I'll need this weekly ritual to keep accountable. In the past, I would avoid the scale and it was an excuse to not really pay attention to how much weight I had gained. Congrats on all of your progress.
  17. My doctor told me he wants me off for 4 weeks only because I'm a paramedic. Honestly, I don't plan on taking that much time off because I can easily go to my part time medic job and do a lot of other things that don't require lifting. After I had my gallbladder out I was ready to go back after 2 weeks but my doc wouldn't release me until 6 weeks.
  18. nssmia

    MAY 2019 Sleevers

    Aww that's my birthday
  19. nevermore71

    Hi everyone!!

    Welcome. Very supportive people around here.
  20. Sodium will def defeat you! I’m nearly a year out and I fluctuate between 121 -123lbs depending on how many calories I eat. If I eat over 1100, I tend to gain. I can easily lose it by eating under 1100 the next day. Mostly I just eat 990-1000 and stay around 121. If I dip below that, I eat extra nuts the next day. My tricks on days when I’m using up calories but feel legitimately hungry or just “want” food? A 16 ounce mug of Hot decaf tea with Truvia and a splash of sugar free French vanilla creamer. Very filling, sweet and few calories. It’s also hydrating. Sometimes I have to do that a few times in the same day! Other times I just say, “Eff it”, have a single serve ice cream cup and deal with it the next day! But I always deal with it within 48 hours so it doesn’t pile up.
  21. Danny Paul

    Failed EVERYTHING, need to know I'm not alone.

    I'm nearly 19 months out and I need support EVERY day. There isn't a day that I don't call someone just to talk and help me work through my maintenance. I go to support groups a therapist and Over Eaters Anonymous. For so many years I Failed at weight loss and I Failed at maintaining what weight I did lose. Today, I ask for and I receive the help I need. It isn't easy, I attend meetings, I call people, I meet with healthcare professionals and I ask for help. You will get support here but you will also probably need to surround yourself with others who can help you on a daily basis. Don't be afraid to seek help or ask for it, you'd be surprised at the amount of help there is to be had.
  22. Go back to basics. Maybe just water for a few hours. Then try milk and give it a few hours before advancing to protein shakes. Then just protein shakes for the next day.
  23. Screwballski

    Plateau since month 6

    I’d dial that sodium down to about 1500, too. It makes a huge difference in weight loss. I know the common thinking had been 2,300 for adults for years but that thinking is changing. Salt is a killer. If you wean off it now, you won’t have to as you age and you will see a difference in your health.
  24. Hello! My name is Cindy and ten days ago I had the gastric sleeve procedure done to help control my weight and eating habits. I never had issues until my son was born but now it’s been 17 years of yo-yo dieting and non-existing self-esteem, never mind the number of health concerns that come along with all of that. I am just so happy I made the decision to do this. I have lots of little worries, concerns and joys to share and I’m looking forward to having that extra support here with all of you along the way. 😊
  25. I'd probably just do protein shakes for a day or two until my stomach settled down. You're way too early out for tomato soup (acid) and crackers (simple carbs) - so that's probably why your pouch rebelled.
  26. Danny Paul

    Construction worker with concerns

    You will be restricted in the amount of weight that you can lift. I was speaking to a friend the other day who hd WLS two weeks ago. He lifted a bag of groceries and immediately regretted it. He said that he felt a sharp pain in his stomach. You will in all probability be on only liquids for the first two weeks. If so you have to monitor your fluid intake and get the proper amount of fluids. If you need to go to work you should plan for the time you will be at work and have your liquids/foods at hand. Most of all you should have a strategy to get through the day physically so that you don't cause harm to yourself. If at all possible, take the time off from work to heal properly.
  27. Aprilgal

    Construction worker with concerns

    I am almost at two weeks, and my doc says max I can lift is 15 pounds. I try to walk at least 3 miles a day, but in general, I am just more tired than average. I fell asleep at 830pm last night. I think at least 3-5 weeks post op - everyone is different. A physical job has way different demands than a desk job. I have a job where I am on my feet all day and have managed to secure 2.5 weeks off - that's also why I keep trying to push myself each day (number of hours on my feet). Plus, you will have to consume fluids every 15 minutes, I'm not sure how I am going to swing that, but I am sure I will - just like everyone else late next week. Best of luck to you. I hope you heal up super quick.
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